NMU CNAS Zaagkii Project interns explain importance of pollinator protection during the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association 2010 Conference in Arizona

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NAISA,Native American and Indigenous Studies Association,Tuscon,Arizona,Zaagkii Project,Leora Tadgerson,Professor Adriana Greci Green,NMU,CNAS,Students,Northern Michigan University,The University of Arizona,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project

NAISA,Native American and Indigenous Studies Association,Tuscon,Arizona,Zaagkii Project,Leora Tadgerson,Professor Adriana Greci Green,NMU,CNAS,Students,Northern Michigan University,The University of Arizona,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project

Led by NMU Center for Native American Studies Director April Lindala, a team of Zaagkii Project interns and an NMU CNAS Professor, attended the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association (NAISA) 2010 Conference on May 22, 2010 in Tuscon, Arizona.

The NMU students made a presentation about the Zaagkii Project during a forum entitled “Engaging Students through Community Action and Service”

The Zaagkii Project is sponsored by the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute (CTI), Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC) and the United States Forest Service (USFS).

Zaagkii Project Partners through the years include the Marquette Community Foundation, Marquette County Juvenile Court, the M.E. Davenport Foundation, the Kaufman Foundation, the Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation, the Upper Peninsula Children’s Museum in Marquette and the Borealis Seed Company in Big Bay, MI.

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Organizer & Chair:
Adriana Greci Green, Northern Michigan University

Participants included:
Leora Tadgerson, Levi Tadgerson, and Samantha “Sam” Hasek, all Zaagkii Project interns from Northern Michigan University Center for Native American Studies
Damien Lee, Trent University, Canada
Nicholas Estes, University of South Dakota
Karla Tait, University of South Dakota
Leya Hale, University of South Dakota
Linc Kesler, University of British Columbia, Canada

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NAISA 2010 Conference Program details
The NAISA 2010 Conference is sponsored by the American Indian Studies at The University of Arizona

NAISA,Native American and Indigenous Studies Association,Tuscon,Arizona,Zaagkii Project,Leora Tadgerson,Professor Adriana Greci Green,NMU,CNAS,Students,Northern Michigan University,The University of Arizona,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project

NAISA staff photo

Robert Warrior, NAISA President 2009-2010

email organizers of the NAISA 2010 Conference

Conference contact info:
Sunny Lybarger
1-520-626-7695
Tsianina Lomawaima
1-520-621-5083

NMU and the Zaagkii Project:

Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project and Northern Michigan University (NMU) Center for Native American Studies featured in news story by NMU News Bureau in the NMU employees newsletter including on the front page

Northern Michigan University Center for Native American Studies Zaagkii Project

NMU CNAS photo gallery on flickr

NMU Zaagkii Project Brochure

The Zaagkii Project is sponsored by the nonprofit <a title=”Official website of the Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute in Marquette, MI:” href=”http://www.cedartreeinstitute.org&#8221; target=”_blank”>Cedar Tree Institute</a> (CTI), <a title=”Official website of the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC) in Baraga, MI:” href=”http://www.kbic-nsn.gov&#8221; target=”_blank”>Keweenaw Bay Indian Community</a> (KBIC) and the <a title=”U.S. Forest Service Wildflowers page:” href=”http://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers&#8221; target=”_blank”>United States Forest Service</a> (USFS).

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USFS Success Story hails 2008-2010 Zaagkii Project

Posted by USFS on 2-02-2010

USFS Success Story on 2008 Zaagkii Project

Posted by USFS on 8-08-2008

American Indian,Native American,youth,bee,bees,Marquette,Michigan,Upper Peninsula,Baraga,teens,teenagers,pollinators,pollen,pollinating,butterflies,butterfly,honeybees,bumblebees,environment,native plants,species extinction

2010 Pollinator Week:

The Fourth Annual National Pollinator Week is June 21-27, 2010

American Indian,Native American,youth,bee,bees,Marquette,Michigan,Upper Peninsula,Baraga,teens,teenagers,pollinators,pollen,pollinating,butterflies,butterfly,honeybees,bumblebees,environment,native plants,species extinction

Photos by Erika Niebler and Greg Peterson

(Negaunee, Michigan)

Her name is Susan Payant but she’s better known as “The Butterfly Lady.”

Susan Payant of Marquette, MI taught the Zaagkii Project teens about the importance of pollinators numerous times in 2008 and 2009.

On June 23, 2009 the students and the Butterfly Lady discussed pollinators including Monarchs and a butterfly that mimics the Monarch called the Viceroy.

At the 2009 nonprofit cedar Tree Institute MidSummer Festival, The Butterfly Lady read a short story/poem about Monarchs by author/illustrator Lois Ehlert entitled Waiting for Wings.

Surrounded by a swarm of 150,000 loudly buzzing bees on a hot summer day, a group of Marquette County teens turned nervous faces and trepidation into smiles and a education that they heard loud and clear to protect rather than fear pollinators.

At first only two teens wearing protective beekeeping gear entered the apiary behind the Negaunee township home of Jim and Martha Hayward. The others wearing only shorts and t-shirts soon approached when they discovered that honeybees are not aggressive.

Suited for Pollinators:

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Beekeeper Jim Hayward, a Marquette dentist, fits a protective suit on Zaagkii Project volunteer Elliott Burdick, 17, a Marquette Senior High School (MSHS) senior and Taylor Dianich, 16, MSHS junior (left behind Hayward), as the Zaagkii group of teens prepare to check out the honeybee hives on June 25, 2009 in the back yard of Hayward’s home in Negaunee Township, MI. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Bees and butterflies “are a part of the web of life because they pollinate all the flowers and fruit trees that provide us with food,” said Dr. Jim Hayward, a Marquette dentist who has four honeybee hives on a shaded hillside.

Plethora of Pollinators:

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Beekeeper Jim Hayward (right) of Negaunee Township, MI explains how to operate a smoker to Taylor Dianich, 16, a Marquette Senior High School (MSHS) junior (center) and Elliott Burdick (left), 17, MSHS senior on June 25, 2009. Hayward explained the smoker calms bees because they protect their honey by gorging themselves with it fearing there is a fire and they may need to flee with the valuable sticky gold to make a new nest. Zaagkii Project teens visited Hayward’s hives in 2008 and 2009. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

The teens literally got up close and personal with the honeybees by inspecting honeycomb trays each covered with about 3,000 busy bees and even handled a drone that Hayward explained do not have stingers like the rest of the colony and are easily identified by a larger round abdomen and bigger eyes.

“It doesn’t have a stinger? Are you positive?,” asked apprehensive teen Keith Gelsinger of Marquette.

The Queen’s Servant:

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Zaagkii Project teen volunteer Anatoly Nelson holds a honeybee drone, that doesn’t have a stinger and can’t even feed itself but has the vital duty of mating with the queen. The teens were amazed that drones can not sting. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

“I am positive,” Hayward said confidently while carefully handing the struggling drone to Gelsinger. “You can grab on to it it won’t sting you.”

Honey Farming Dentist:

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Beekeeper and Marquette Dentist Dr. Jim Hayward has been hosting Zaagkii teens since the project began – giving the students a hands-on, up-close and personal experience with his 150,000 honeybees near Negaunee, MI.

Hayward and his wife Martha love the taste of honey and he says his beekeeping hobby has nothing to do with trying to keep youth from eating sugar and avoid dental problems – it’s a pleasant coincidence. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

In his soft-spoken, calm demeanor that relaxed the teens and the bees, Hayward said “you can stand a lot closer if you want, you won’t get stung.”

“The sole purpose of the drone is to mate with the queen. Otherwise it has no function. It can’t even feed itself. The other worker bees have to feed the drones.”

The teens let out an audible but soft gasp when Hayward pulled out a tray that was dripping with honey and packed with bees.

“Oooohh,” several of the astonished youths said at once.

Pointing to the edge of the honey-oozing tray in the bright sun, Hayward said “you can see the glistening of honey there.”

“It’s awesome,’ said 13-year-old eighth grader Tanya Nelson of Ishpeming. “Look at it, it’s honey, it’s dripping.”

Sweet Honey:

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Zaagkii Project volunteer 17-year-old Elliott Burdick of Marquette, MI inspects a honeycomb oozing with honey and covered with thousands of honeybees that is being held by veteran beekeeper Dr. Jim Hayward. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

The teens also visited a bee farm along the Dead River operated by Dr. Lisa Long and Lee Ossenheimer in Negaunee Township and heard from beekeeper Jon Kniskern of Marquette.

Beekeeper Jon Kniskern:

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Zaagkii Project teens learned about honeybees from three northern Michigan beekeepers including Jon Kniskern of Marquette who brought hive frames and other tools of the trade like a smoker to his session with the students next to the peaceful Marquette Lower Harbor on Lake Superior in the summer of 2009.

The teens also visited the beekeeping operations of beekepers Jim Hayward and Lee Ossenheimer of Gather’n Greens. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

The Zaagkii Project is sponsored by the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute (CTI), Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC) and the United States Forest Service (USFS).

We are Family:

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

Dozens of northern Michigan teens have participated in the Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project (Photos by Greg Peterson)

2008 Zaagkii Projects Teens:

In July 2008 at the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute annual Mid-Summer Festival, Zaagkii Project teens told supporters what they were learning about pollinators and indigenous plants and wildflowers.

Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,2008,teens,teenagers,students,bees,butterflies,pollinators

Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,2008,teens,teenagers,students,bees,butterflies,pollinators

During the first summer (2008) of the Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project, teens built, painted and handed out butterfly houses – that a slimmer and longer than bird houses with entries for butterflies with folded wings and a slab of bark for rest and reproduction.

Some of the students returned in 2009 to participate in the second summer of the Zaagkii Project during which mason bee houses were built, painted and distributed.

Both years the teens planted and distributed thousands of native species plants.

(Photos by Greg Peterson)

Teen Anatoly Nelson was impressed that he was able to stand in the huge swarm and not get stung.

“Holy cow, that’s a lot of bees,” said Nelson, who also handled a honeybee drone that doesn’t have a stinger.

Getting a Grip:

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Beekeeper Jim Hayward of Negaunee, MI uses a gripper to show one of the honeycomb trays to Zaagkii teens during a June 25, 2009 visit by Zaagkii Project members. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Student Anatoly Nelson also stood in a thick warm of bees and watched with amazement as they buzzed around his body and even bumped him without stinging or becoming alarmed.

Unbee-lievable Buzz:

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Anatoly Nelson (left) calmly freezes, and can’t help smiling, as a swarm of honeybees bounced off his body but were not upset by his presence at the Hayward apiary. Watching are 16-year old Jake Gentz (center), a Marquette Senior High School senior; and Jim Rule (right), a child care counselor at Marquette County Youth Home. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Honeybees often have “sacks of yellow or orange pollen on its legs,” Hayward said. “They are busy bringing their nectar and pollen back to the hive.”

“You can learn a lot about the health of the hive by just looking at the flow of the bees coming in and out of the hive,” Hayward said as the heavy bees bounced in for landings.

Golden Combs:

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Beekeeper Jim Hayward (left) holds a tray with thousands of honey bees as Zaagkii Project eighth grader Tanya Nelson (second from left), 13, of Ishpeming, MI watches in amazement along with Cedar Tree Institute volunteer Amanda Emerson (second from right) of Cary, Ill., the 21-year-old event coordinator for the Northern Michigan University (NMU) Student Team and an NMU Senior Majoring in International Studies (emphasis on Latin America) and Earth Science (emphasis on rocks and minerals). Making a point is Zaagkii Project volunteer Tom Reed (right) of Marquette, who has a bachelors degree in social work and has worked on several Cedar Tree Institute environment projects. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

In its second summer, the three-year Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project protects pollinators through habitat creation that includes teenagers constructing dozens of bee and butterfly houses while helping native plants flourish by distributing and planting tens of thousands indigenous seeds.

Billions of bees of have died worldwide in an ongoing syndrome dubbed Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD). Suspected causes for CCD include pollution, pesticides, climate change and habitat destruction.

Bees have always been killed by a wide-range of predators.

Natural bee killers include black bears that raid hives for honey, bald-faced hornets who kill the queen and feast on the colony, birds that pick them off in mid-air and skunks who scratch on the hive with an insatiable taste for guard bees.

Zaagkii Project Teens:

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Zaagkii Project teens at the Dancing Crane Farm in Skandia, MI in the summer of 2009 (Photo by Erika Niebler)

Feral and commercial hives are attacked by viruses, bacteria and parasites like a tracheal mite that infests honeybee airways and blood-sucking mites that infect and feed on adult and larval bees causing wings deformities.

Pollinator Pleasure:

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Beekeeper Jim Hayward explains the difference in the appearance of members of the honeybee family like worker bees and drones as Zaagkii Project volunteer Keith Gelsinger of Marquette, MI smiles. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Hayward uses electric fences to protect bees from persistent bears and elevates hives on cinder blocks to discourage skunks.

“That makes the skunks have to stand up, so their bellies are exposed and the bees can sting them more easily,” Hayward said.

Experts say bee colonies have declined 70 to 90 percent in the past quarter century. Albert Einstein predicted humans would die within four years if bees disappeared.

“People get into beekeeping is to sell their pollination services to orchards around the country” including “apple and cherry orchards in Michigan,” Hayward said.

Youthful Green Thumbs:

Joining Forces: The force of Mother Nature’s Native Species Plants and the powerful hungry for knowledge Zaagkii Project teens are unstoppable….

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Zaagkii Project students work in one of the vast fields with native species plants in the summer of 2009 at the Dancing Crane Farm in Skandia, MI (Photo by Erika Niebler)

“I got into raising bees after local bee populations died out because of some disease and we did not have anything to pollinate” our fruits and vegetables, Hayward said.

Bodacious Honeybees:

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About 3,000 honeybees cling to every tray that all ooze with honey at the apiary run by beekeeper Dr. Jim Hayward in Negaunee, MI. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

The teens learned about beekeeper tools like honeycomb trays, frame grippers, a hive tool and a bee brush.

“You can brush them off an area with this gentle brush and it won’t damage the bees,” Hayward said.

Happy and Unafraid:

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(Photo by Greg Peterson)

While reassuring the teens that “honeybees tend to be docile,” Hayward donned himself and two youths in protective gear including a bee veil and gloves.

“If I make a false step and jar the hive or move to quickly it keeps me from being stung,” he said. “Honeybees die if they sting you, so they are not anxious to sting unless they are protecting themselves or the hive.”

Nature’s Best Friends:

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Zaagkii Project teens gather along the edges of the apiary in Negaunee, MI that has numerous honeybee hives while listening to Dr. Jim Hayward’s honeybee facts. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

“The queen excluder keeps the queen from getting up into the honey chambers and laying eggs so you don’t get larval bees into the honey,” he said. “These two chambers are the brood chambers, where the hive raises its new bees.”

During the summer, the queen “lays close to a thousand eggs a day,” Hayward said. “It takes 21 days for a bee to develop.”

Smoking Sumac:

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Zaagkii Project tens learned several uses for bitter dried sumac, a plant indigenous to northern Michigan, including making a lemonade-flavored tea and for use in a bee smoker. Beekeeper Jim Hayward (left) demonstrates how to light the dried sumac to Zaagkii Project volunteer Elliott Burdick (center), 17, a Marquette Senior High School (MSHS) senior and Taylor Dianich, 16, MSHS junior (right). (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Using a smoker that burns dried sumac, Hayward said the smoke “simulates a forest fire” triggering a protective instinct that causes the bees “to gorge themselves with honey in preparation for leaving the hive.”

2009 Zaagkii Project Teens:

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Zaagkii Project teens learned respect for nature and themselves during the summer of 2009. (Photo by Erika Niebler)

Hayward explained that the bitter sumac burning in his bee smoker makes a great tea that tastes like lemon.

Later the teens made sumac iced tea, add a drop of Hayward’s honey and served it to Zaagkii Project supporters at the annual CTI Midsummer Festival at Presque Isle in Marquette. The youths made other natural hors d’oeuvres like honey and wild mint in a tiny appetizer cup.

Lake Superior Safe Harbor:

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Sitting on the Dock of the Bay with Zaagkii Students:

Marquette teens listen to Zaagkii Project founder Rev. Jon Magnuson while sitting on the edge of a bike path that parallels the Marquette Upper Harbor next the the old iron ore docks once used by giant ships to haul ore to steels mills on the lower Great Lakes – ships like the Edmund Fitzgerald (Photos by Erika Niebler)

The smoker causes the bees to quickly consume honey for possible transport to a new hive and the honey relaxes the bees so they won’t sting while being handled.

“When they are gorged with honey they are more docile,” he said. “The key is moving slowly and trying to be a gentle as you can be so the bees don’t get too excited.”

Zaagkii Coverup:

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Nettin’ to be Afraid of:

Dr. Jim Hayward adjusts a protective bee net and hat worn by Zaagkii Project volunteers (Photo by Greg Peterson)

“Drones develop from unfertilized eggs, worker bees are developed from fertilized eggs,” Hayward said.

“If they need to make a queen they take worker larva and feed it a special extract from their heads called Royal Jelly and that larva grows into a queen instead of a worker.”

Check it out:

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Zaagkii Project teens visit Gather’n Greens on June 24, 2009, a bee farm along the Dead River operated by Dr. Lisa Long and Lee Ossenheimer in Negaunee Township, MI.

Their seven-year-old son, Jesse Ossenheimer, is pictured showing Zaagkii project students some of the frames used by bees to produce honey. The couple also grow mushrooms.

Zaagkii Project teens went swimming in Dead River Basin after tasting honey and visiting with beekeeper Lee Ossenheimer. It’s a family affair as the couple’s children taught the students about the art of beekeeping. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Exact Extracting:

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Beekeeper Lee Ossenheimer of Negaune Township, MI and his seven-year-old son, Jesse Ossenheimer show Zaagkii Project teens the honey extractor that spins and uses centrifugal force to remove the honey from the frames on honeycombs. Ossenheimer and his wife Dr. Lisa Long, own an organic farm that includes a beekeeping, mushroom and vegetable seedling business named Gather’n Greens in Negaunee Township, MI. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Future Beekeeper:

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Seven-year-old Jesse Ossenheimer shows a honeycomb frame to Zaagkii Project volunteer Taylor Dianich, 16, a MSHS Junior. Jesse has learned a lot about his parents beekeeping operations at their business Gather’n Greens in Negaunee, Township, MI. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

The teens likely have “never been that close to a bee hive before,” said Jim Rule, a child care counselor at Marquette County Youth Home.

“Even the kids that did not have any protective gear were right up close too,” Rule said. “I was amazed at how brave they were.”

Yummy Tummy Honey:

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Above, Zaagkii Projects teens Anatoly Nelson (second from right) and Brandon Maki (right) enjoy fresh honey provided by beekeeper Dr. Lisa Long (left) in Negaunee Township, MI. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Sticky Licking:

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Zaagkii Project eighth grader Tanya Nelson (left), 13, of Ishpeming, MI uses a fork to enjoy the fresh honey provided by Dr. Lisa Long. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Honey Heaven:

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Hayward Honey:

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

Beekeeper Dr. Jim Hayward speaks in July 2009 to Zaagkii Project supporters at the annual Mid-Summer Festival hosted by the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute in the pavilion on Marquette’s Presque Isle that’s surrounded on three sides by Lake Superior. (Photos by Greg Peterson)

Gather’n Greens:

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Holding his three-year-old son Alex Ossenheimer, beekeeper Lee Ossenheimer of Negaune Township, MI talks with Zaagkii Project teens on June 24, 2009 before taking them on a tour of his apiary and mushroom growing operations named Gather’n Greens. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Sunny Honeycomb:

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Zaagkii Project teen Devon Myers checks out the sunlit honeycomb frames used by beekeepers and their bees to create honey. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Pass the Comb:

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Zaagkii Project eighth grader Tanya Nelson (left), 13, of Ishpeming, MI holds a frame used by beekeepers to have bees create honeycombs. Below, teen Brandon Maki sniffs the wax smell of the honeycomb tray after the honey is removed. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

PhotobucketThe teens sniffed honeycomb trays and checked them out using the sun. Honeycombs trays have a unique, waxy smell that the teens will always remember (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Mother of Monarchs:

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

“The Butterfly Lady” Susan Payant of Marquette reads a short story about Monarchs entitled: “Waiting for Wings” by author/poet Lois Ehlert in July 2009 at the annual nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute Mi-Summer Festival in Marquette. (Photos by Greg Peterson)

For a second year, Susan Payant of Marquette, nicknamed “The Butterfly Lady,” taught Zaagkii Project teens about the importance of Monarch butterflies and native plants.

At the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute 2009 Mid-Summer Festival at Presque Isle Pavilion in Marquette during July, Payant reads a childrens short story/poem entitled: “Waiting for Wings” by Lois Ehlert, author, poet, designer, illustrator.

The Butterfly Lady:

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For the second year, Susan Payant of Marquette taught Zaagkii Project teens about Monarchs and other butterflies and why they are second only to bees when it comes to pollination.

The popular, pleasant and passionate Payant is well-known around northern Michigan and is lovingly called “The Butterfly Lady” because of her love for butterflies and their life-cycle. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

Hundreds of thousands of Monarchs pass through the U.P. each year enroute to a famous gathering spot in Mexico where millions of Monarchs converge from across the world.

The teens visited Laughing White Fish Falls in Alger County, the organic Dancing Crane Farm run by Natasha and David Gill in Skandia, and planted native species plants at the Borealis Seed Company owned by Sue Rabitaille in Big Bay.

Meeting three days a week for five weeks, the teens walked dozens of miles during numerous hikes, climbed Sugar Loaf, and swam in Lake Superior and the Dead River.

Cedar Tree Fans:

American Indian,Native American,youth,bee,bees,Marquette,Michigan,Upper Peninsula,Baraga,teens,teenagers,pollinators,pollen,pollinating,butterflies,butterfly,honeybees,bumblebees,environment,native plants,species extinction

Zaagkii Project supporters enjoy themselves at the July 2009 Mid-Summer Festival in the pavilion at Presque Isle in Marquette. (Photos by Greg Peterson)

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The teens built a huge beehive with help from Jim Edwards at the U.P. Children’s Museum, who created a large butterfly for the Zaagkii Project in 2008.

Using hoops, spray paint, and other tricks, Edwards showed the teens that many things can be built out of everyday products including the beehive, bees and the butterfly. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Rockin’ Rick:

Soothing Thai Chi from expert Rick Pietila is sought by famous bands for his techie expertise:

Rick Pietila does Tai Chi July 2009

Relaxation techniques like Tai Chi are now part of the Zaagkii teens repertoire thanks to martial artist Rick Pietila of Marquette, MI who gave several demonstrations including Tai Chi fundamentals. (Above Photo by Greg Peterson)

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The students learned Tai Chi along the calming Lower Harbor in Marquette, MI with a fresh Lake Superior breeze an important part of the June 23, 2009 experience.

Rick Pietila’s other ongoing amazing adventures include traveling with several legendary Rock and Roll groups including being a guitar tech for the band Boston and traveled into South America with the band Stryper and has been a road techie for many other iconic bands. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

Native Senses:

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The students learned about different species of native plants and insects during several outings with an Ojibwa brother and sister Levi and Leora Tadgerson – who are Zaagkii Project interns from the NMU Department of Native American Studies. (Above and below photos by Greg Peterson)

The students learned “different uses the Ojibwa had for edible and medicinal plants” like “the saps of different trees and the roots,” said Levi Tadgerson, 22, of Marquette, an NMU senior.

“We explained this plant is good for keeping bugs away from you and this plant is good for a breath mint,” Tadgerson said.

Native American Heritage

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The Tadgersons were impressed with the teens’ ability to grasp Chippewa language because “we would tell them the different native names for plants and two days later they would remember it,” said Leora Tadgerson of Negaunee.

“I think the earth is suffering,” she said. “Indicator plants like wild rice that don’t grow as much anymore because of the way we have abused the earth.”

Heritage and Culture:

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Zaagkii Project instructors Levi Tadgerson and Leora Tadgerson of Negaunee, MI are interns from the Northern Michigan University center for Native American Studies in Marquette. Leora is pictured teaching the teens how to recognized various plants indigenous to the central Upper Peninsula of Michigan near Lake Superior. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

The pair taught the teens to seek a “symbiotic relationship” with the earth because “nowadays we are more of a parasite to the planet,” Levi Tadgerson said. “We need to respect the gift we have been given by Mother Earth.”

The Anishinaabemowin Way

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Northern Michigan University Center for Native American Studies Anishinaabemowin Professor Kenneth Pitawanakwat explained why and how Native Americans show respect for the earth and then led the closing prayer at the CTI Mid-Summer Festival in July 2009. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

“There are ways to heal by just getting into the woods and learning knowledge from elders,” he said. “There are gifts and teachings every day that you will get from the earth.”

Both passed on respect for the earth inherited from elders and knowledge about native plants learned from NMU Anishinaabemowin Professor Kenneth Pitawanakwat, who offered the closing prayer at the CTI midsummer festival.

“We greet each day and end each day with a thank you prayer,” Pitawanakwat said.

“In Native America, all events begin and end with prayer. It’s a spiritual component that’s all done with prayer. There is no such thing as a separation of church and state.”

Martial arts training and Tai Chi lessons, techniques for relaxation, were given to the teens by Rick Pietila of Marquette. They performed their new talents art at the CTI Mid-Summer Festival in Marquette.

Noting a Tai Chi performance by the Zaagkii Project teens, Pitawanakwat said:

“The sounds from the soft fluttering moves of Tai Chi were very beneficial to all of us.”

Nature Moves:

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

Zaagkii Project instructor Rick Pietila of Marquette taught the teens many relaxation techniques including Tai Chi that the group performed at the Cedar Tree Institute 2009 Mid-Summer Festival. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Turning to the band, Terracotta half-life (pictured below) of Marquette, Pitawanakwat said “megwich for your inspirational songs.”

Live with Terracotta half-life

Scroll down to credits to learn more about Terracotta half-life.

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

A few weeks earlier, the sounds of hammers and saws filled the Grace United Methodist Church in Marquette for several days as the teens built and painted 36 mason bee houses with help from carpenter/retired teacher Bruce Ventura and artist Diana Magnuson, both of Marquette.

In 2008, other Zaagkii Project teens built and painted 17 butterfly houses at the church.

Carpentry skills:

Building Zaagkii Project houses 7/7/09

Former school teacher Bruce Ventura (pictured in above collage) of Marquette taught the Zaagkii Project students to build mason bee houses during the summer of 2009 at the Grace United Methodist Church in Marquette.

(Photos by Greg Peterson)

Mason Bee Houses:

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Shaped like a birdhouse, the mason bee houses have five pieces of wood below the roof with 33 holes that are each turned into a private nursery. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Creative Teens:

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Zaagkii Project students paint the mason bee houses on July 8, 2009 that they built a few days earlier at the Grace United Methodist Church in Marquette, MI. (Photos by Greg Peterson)

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Mason bees “are very particular” and “want a five-sixteenths inch diameter hole,” Ventura said. “If the holes are too large other insects get into them, and if the holes are too small the mason bees can’t get in.”

After laying a single egg into each hole, the mason bees “deposit some pollen and mud that hole closed hence the name mason bee,” Ventura said.

Mason Bee Motivation

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Zaagkii Project students paint the mason bee houses on July 8, 2009 that they built a few days earlier at the Grace United Methodist Church in Marquette, MI. (Photos by Greg Peterson)

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Mason bees “make these holes three to six inches deep depending on the size of the tree,” he said. “Mason bees are solitary bees, they’re not colonial like honey bees.”

While mason bees do not make honey, Ventura said “they’re great pollinators like honeybees.”

Ventura is impressed with the teen’s carpentry and artistic skills.

“The young people are terrific,” he said. “They did a great job putting the mason bee houses together and decorating. They did a lot of sawing and nailing and screwed in the tops.”

Lessons on protecting pollinators was not lost on the Zaagkii Project teens.

“I learned that there are 4,000 different species of bees,” Bobbie Weymouth, 14, of Beaver Grove told project supporters at the CTI Midsummer Festival.

Earlier, Weymouth explained what he’d learned about mason bees as he nailed and sanded mason bee houses.

“The bees are going to put pollen it these holes and put mud in and then they hatch an egg,” said Weymouth, whose brother Daniel participated in the Manoomin Project, a CTI environment initiative that paired Marquette teens with Native American elders to restore wild rice to seven remote rivers and lakes across the U.P.

While screwing on a mason bee house roof and sanding the edges, Elliott Burdick, 17, of Marquette said “pollinators are important to all life on earth because they pollinate all the fruits and vegetables we eat.”

“I am screwing in the roof to the base of the bees houses right now,” Burdick said. “Then I am sanding it down so the edges are not sharp and making it all flush. The mason bees will be going inside these holes.”

Looking Sharp:

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Artistic Appreciation:

Zaagkii Project,teens,illustrator Diana Magnuson,Diana Magnuson,Sherri Bohjanen-Hutter,Anchorage,Alaska,painting,mason bee houses,Grace United Methodist Church,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project

Zaagkii Project teens gave presents to children’s book illustrator Diana Magnuson (center) of Marquette and artist Sherri Bohjanen-Hutter (right), a Marquette native from Anchorage, Alaska. The artists helped the Zaagkii teens learned about different kids of paint and techniques as they used colorful designs on their mason bee houses. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Zaagkii Project founder Rev. Jon Magnuson talks to Cedar Tree Institute supporters in July 2009 as the Zaagkii students cook on the pavilion grill on Presque Isle in Marquette, MI at the annual CTI Mid-Summer Festival. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

A Good Sign:

Building Zaagkii Project houses 7/7/09

Zaagkii Project teens hold signs about the pollinator initiative during a summer 2009 group discussion on protecting pollinators.

(Photo by Greg Peterson)

The students learned that butterflies are just as important pollinators as bees.

“I learned that Monarch butterflies only eat and lay their eggs on milkweed,” said Jake Gentz, 16, who will be a senior this fall at Marquette Senior High Schools

Student Brandon Maki of Marquette said he “learned we can make natural teas out of spruce trees and pine trees.”

The mason bee houses are now in yards across Marquette County. The mason bee houses and last summer’s butterfly houses were put up around the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community and one of each were placed by the USFS in the “The People’s Garden” at U.S. Department of Agriculture Headquarters on the National Mall in Washington D.C.

Teen Devon Myers of Marquette told Zaagkii Project supporters at the CTI Midsummer Festival that the students “made 36 mason bee houses and we are giving some of them away tonight.”

USFS officials said the Zaagkii Project is effectively spreading the word about the importance of native plants and the teen mason bee and butterfly houses have a positive impact on the survival of pollinators.

The U.S. Forest Service (USFS):

The USFS is part of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

U.S. Forest Service official Jan Schultz gives an update on the Zaagkii Project and the forest service extensive efforts to protect pollinators and promote native species plants in July 2008 at the annual Cedar Tree Institute Summer Festival in Marquette, MI. Schultz is the USFS botany and non-native species program leader in Milwaukee, WI. (Photos by Greg Peterson)

“In point of fact, the mason bee houses are very useful,” said Jan Schultz, USFS botany and non-native species program leader in Milwaukee, WI. “The mason bee houses are used by mason bees and other types of solitary bees. They really like them and they will have customers.”

“The insect pollinators in North America evolved with indigenous plants and so they are really well-suited to pollinate them,” Schultz said after watching the teens make the houses in Marquette.

Schultz said that “native plants and the native insects that pollinate them represent a symbiotic relationship” and cannot survive without each other.

Native Species Plants:

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Zaagkii Project teams spent hours and hours in the deep northwoods learning about native species plants including learning about the different benefits of the plants such as medicinal from Native American teachings thanks to NMU Center for Native American Studies Zaagkii project interns Leora and Levi Tadgerson. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

“In some instances they have a mutualistic relationship, where they are pollinated by one insect and one plant species, so it can be really specific,” she said.

Vegetable and flower garden production increases when “native plants are in close proximity,” she said, “because the pollinators that people want to pollinate their squash or tomatoes need to have food all summer long.”

Life-Giving Water:

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The importance of northern Michigan’s vast water resources to the health and vitality of indigenous plants, pollinators and humans was absorbed by Zaagkii Project teens who also took the time to swim and relax in frigid but pristine Lake Superior and several rivers/streams in Marquette and Alger counties in the summers of 2008 and 2009 (Photos by Erika Niebler)

Pollinators “are not going to magically appear in front of a tomato flower at an appropriate time,” Schultz said. “So planting with native plants in proximity to their garden makes for a much more productive garden and more produce.”

“Milkweeds and monarchs are a stunning example ,” she said. “The monarch larva prefer to eat various milkweed species.”

“The more of the milkweed that monarchs eat, the less palatable they are to predators because apparently they taste really horrible,” Schultz said. “So that’s beneficial to the monarch butterfly and they also pollinate the milkweed flower.”

Protecting Pollinators:

Working Together: Native Americans, non-natives, young and old, teens and college students …

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

During the CTI Midsummer festival, KBIC Tribal President Chris Swartz Jr. (bottom left photo in collage) announced the building of a native plants greenhouse that scheduled to be built in 2010 on tribal property near Baraga. (Photos by Greg Peterson)

Native Understanding:

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

In 2010, the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community will build the first native species plants greenhouse on a Native American reservation that will be similar to the Hiawatha National Forest Greenhouse (Upper left photo in collage) in Marquette, MI.

Zaagkii students (upper right photo) plants seeds in the summer of 2008 and have have planted/distributed tens of thousands of native species plants and seeds.

The plants were later planted along the KBIC Sand Point beach in Baraga County that was once polluted by copper mining operations. Two photos on bottom right show the Sand Point beach after the copper tailings were covered and before the native plants were planted.

Cedar Tree Institute/Zaagkii project organizers meet with officials with the KBIC Natural Resource Department (bottom middle photo) in the summer of 2008 to plan the Sand Point native plants project. (Photos by Greg Peterson)

KBIC “is happy to be partnering with the Cedar Tree Institute and the U.S. Forest Service in trying to protect native plants and bring them back home,” Swartz said.

“One day we hope (KBIC) will be regarded as pioneers to bring these native plants back here,” he said. “So it’s only fitting that the (KBIC) become involved in helping save those native plants.”

A History of Cooperation:

The Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC), the United States Forest Service (USFS) and the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute in Marquette, MI

American Indian,Native American,youth,bee,bees,Marquette,Michigan,Upper Peninsula,Baraga,teens,teenagers,pollinators,pollen,pollinating,butterflies,butterfly,honeybees,bumblebees,environment,native plants,species extinction

Hiawatha National Forest Greenhouse:

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Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Using spades, wheelbarrows and gardener’s gloves, Zaagkii Project teens planted/distributed tens of thousands of native species plant seeds and harvested seedlings at the Hiawatha National Forest Greenhouse in Marquette, MI. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

“We have been working with the Cedar Tree Institute for a number of years and they are great to work with,” said Swartz, noting the Manoomin Project to restore wild rice and native plants restoration project at the KBIC Sand Point beach on Lake Superior.

Honoring Mother Earth:

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

Teaching respect for Native American culture and the planet are goals the CTI plans to continue for another decade, CTI officials said during the festival.

Zaagkii HeadshotsNonprofit Cedar Tree Institute board member Steve Mattson speaks to supports in July 2009 at the annual CTI Mid-Summer Festival in Marquette, MI

(Photo By Greg Peterson)

“We honor the presence of the Native Americans,” said Marquette banker and CTI board member Steve Mattson.

“It’s tremendous that the (KBIC) have shown the leadership and the vision to have the first greenhouse for native species plants in the U.S. on their native land,” Mattson said.

Working “behind the scenes,” the CTI will continue efforts like the Zaagkii and Manoomin projects because “they are important,” Mattson said.

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

Philanthropic Mattson Family:

Steve Mattson and his family (and friends) have a long history of supporting the Upper Peninsula business community, nonprofit initiatives and people …

“We’re the quiet people and we like to keep it that way”

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

“We’re the quiet people and we like to keep it that way,” Mattson said. “We like to do big things and we can only do big things through each of you.”

The Zaagkii Project contributors include the Marquette Community Foundation, Marquette County Juvenile Court, the M.E. Davenport Foundation, the Kaufman Foundation and the Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation.

Peter White Library :

Pollinating the Minds of our Youth about the importance of bees, butterflies and other pollinators

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Zaagkii Project teens visited the Peter White Public Library in Marquette, MI during the summer of 2009to learn facts about pollinators, native species plants and the effect of both on the food they eat. The teens learned about the various species of indigenous plants in northern Michigan and Midwest – and spread their knowledge to others including the fact that pollinators are keystone to the survival of all life on this planet because the service provided by bees, butterflies and other pollinators are the reason plants, trees, vegetables and fruit grow – and that food is vital to all forms of life. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

Native Plants Northern Light:

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The Borealis Seed Company in Big Bay, MI literally brought Zaagkii Projects students to their knees as the teens helped the owners manage the operation that specializes in native species plants and seeds.

Borealis Seed Company is run by the mother-daughter team of Judy Keast and Suzanne Rabitaille on a 20-acre spread three miles south of Big Bay of which about 5 acres is cultivated. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

Organic Farm:

Turkeys, Goats, Pigs …

Butterflies, Bees, Cranes and Things…

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The Zaagkii students were amazed by all the animals that roam the organic Dancing Crane Farm run by Natasha and David Gill, who understand the importance of protecting pollinators.

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With a plethora of wildlife, Dancing Crane Farm in Skandia, MI has naturally grown and raised vegetables, flowers and more on 20 acres with almost five acres cultivated. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

Zaagkii Project Fellowship:

Teens, college students and older adults …

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When they were not building butterfly houses, mason bee houses and distributing/planting native species plants, the Zaagkii Project students had time to become friends, reflect on their work and enhance social skills during lunches, outdoor bar-b-ques and other time for bonding and fun. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

Nature Naturally:

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Zaagkii project teens have learned a deep appreciation for nature during their many hours spent in the majestic northwoods of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula along breath-taking waterfalls and winding streams with the pungent smell of pollination and bees wafting through the warm air. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

Healthy Lunch thanks to Pollinators:

healthy lunch,lettuce,salad,tomato,cucumber,greens,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Zaagkii Project

Zaagkii Project Northern Michigan University volunteer and student leader Erika Niebler prepared healthy lunches for the students including a large salad in July 2009.

The Zaagkii Project students said their salad with a wide variety of veggies would not have been possible without pollinators to make the lettuce, tomatoes, and other vegetables grow. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Transplanting Native Species:

Herbs/Veggies/Mushrooms …

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Getting their hands in the soil at At Gather’n Greens in Negaunee Township, MI, Zaagkii Project students learned about organic vegetables, indigenous herbs – and the transplanting of veggie and herb seedlings. Beekeeper Lee Ossenheimer and wife Dr. Lisa Long own the organic farm Gather’n Greens along the Dead River in northern Michigan. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

Organic Mushrooms:

Zaagkii Project teens learned about the challenges of growing mushrooms during the chilly, windy and rainy “summer that wasn’t” in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula along a Lake Superior tributary.

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An organic Mushroom growing operation is part of Gather’n Greens, an organic farm near Negaunee, MI owned by Lee Ossenheimer and wife Dr. Lisa Long.

The students learned that the mushrooms are grown by drilling holes in logs that are filled with mushroom spawn. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

American Indian,Native American,youth,bee,bees,Marquette,Michigan,Upper Peninsula,Baraga,teens,teenagers,pollinators,pollen,pollinating,butterflies,butterfly,honeybees,bumblebees,environment,native plants,species extinction

Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project Contacts, Supporters and Related Links:

USFS Success Story hails 2008-2010 Zaagkii Project

Posted 2-02-2010

USFS Success Story on 2008 Zaagkii Project

Posted 8-08-2008

U.S. Forest Service:

USFS,United States Forest Service,logo,U.S. Forest Service,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,pollinators,bees,butterflies,Jan Schultz U.S. Forest Service logo/banner

Larry Stritch, USFS National Botanist

Larry Stritch

National Botanist USDA U.S. Forest Service

1400 Independence Ave., SW

Mail stop 1103

Washington, D.C.

20090-6090

1-202-205-1279 (Office)

email USFS National Botanist Larry Stritch

Larry Stritch honored for USFS Celebrating Wildflowers website

Above Photo of Larry Stritch from the Arizona Native Plant Society publication entitled “The Plant Press

American Indian,Native American,youth,bee,bees,Marquette,Michigan,Upper Peninsula,Baraga,teens,teenagers,pollinators,pollen,pollinating,butterflies,butterfly,honeybees,bumblebees,environment,native plants,species extinction

USFS wildflowers page

Wildflowers in the Eastern Region

American Indian,Native American,youth,bee,bees,Marquette,Michigan,Upper Peninsula,Baraga,teens,teenagers,pollinators,pollen,pollinating,butterflies,butterfly,honeybees,bumblebees,environment,native plants,species extinction

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Jan Schultz, USFS

Botany, Non-native Invasive Species

Special Forest Products Program Leader

USDA Forest Service Eastern Region

626 Wisconsin Avenue, 7th Floor

Milwaukee, WI

53203

1-414-297-1189 (wk)

1-414-944-3963 (fax)

Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Jan Schultz,United States Forest Service,USFS,Milwaukee,wildflowers,bees,butterflies Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Jan Schultz,United States Forest Service,USFS,Milwaukee,wildflowers,bees,butterflies Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Jan Schultz,United States Forest Service,USFS,Milwaukee,wildflowers,bees,butterflies Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Jan Schultz,United States Forest Service,USFS,Milwaukee,wildflowers,bees,butterflies Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Jan Schultz,United States Forest Service,USFS,Milwaukee,wildflowers,bees,butterflies Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Jan Schultz,United States Forest Service,USFS,Milwaukee,wildflowers,bees,butterflies Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Presque Isle,April Lindala,Jan Schukltz,kids,USFS,United States Forest Service,NMU,Northern Michigan University Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Presque Isle,April Lindala,Jan Schukltz,kids,USFS,United States Forest Service,NMU,Northern Michigan University Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Presque Isle,April Lindala,Jan Schukltz,kids,USFS,United States Forest Service,NMU,Northern Michigan University Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Presque Isle,April Lindala,Jan Schukltz,kids,USFS,United States Forest Service,NMU,Northern Michigan University Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Presque Isle,April Lindala,Jan Schukltz,kids,USFS,United States Forest Service,NMU,Northern Michigan University Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Presque Isle,April Lindala,Jan Schukltz,kids,USFS,United States Forest Service,NMU,Northern Michigan University

email Jan Schultz

USFS links and information page about plants, botany, the Zaagkii Project and other efforts to protect pollinators and the importance of native species plants

Cedar Tree Institute,Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute,Rev. Jon Magnuson,Spirit of Place,Los Alamos,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,EarthKeepers,Upper Peninsula Earth Keepers,U.P. EarthKeepers,Interfaith Earth Healing Initiative,Earth Healing Initiative,nonprofit,Marquette,Michigan,Environment,ethics,counseling,Lutheran,pastor,reverendZaagkii Headshots Photobucket Photobucket Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Presque Isle,April Lindala,Jan Schukltz,kids,USFS,United States Forest Service,NMU,Northern Michigan University Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Presque Isle,April Lindala,Jan Schukltz,kids,USFS,United States Forest Service,NMU,Northern Michigan University Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Presque Isle,April Lindala,Jan Schukltz,kids,USFS,United States Forest Service,NMU,Northern Michigan University Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket

Rev. Jon Magnuson

Founder of the three-year (2008-2010) Zaagkii Project

Executive Director of the Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute

402 E. Michigan St.

Marquette, MI

49855

email Rev. Jon Magnuson

906-228-5494 (hm)

906-360-5072 (cell)

Cedar Tree Institute (CTI) Winter 2009 Newsletter

Photobucket Zaagkii Project,teens,illustrator Diana Magnuson,Diana Magnuson,Sherri Bohjanen-Hutter,Anchorage,Alaska,painting,mason bee houses,Grace United Methodist Church,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project

Illustrator Diana Magnuson

Diana Magnuson biography

email Diana Magnuson

Kids Book website on illustrator Diana Magnuson of Marquette, MI

——-

NMU Students Leaders and volunteers for the Cedar Tree Institute and the Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project:

Zaagkii Headshots healthy lunch,salad,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,lettuce,tomato,cucumber,bread,teenagers,teenager,students

Photobucket Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Erika Niebler

Erika is a Northern Michigan University (NMU) student and volunteers for numerous Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute initiatives including the Zaagkii Project, Zaagkii Project photographer, NMU Lutheran Campus Ministry student leader and photographer

1-763-670-0611

2008 Zaagkii Project pixs with Sarah Swanson 2008 Zaagkii Project pixs with Sarah Swanson 2008 Zaagkii Project pixs with Sarah Swanson and Diana Magnuson Photobucket 2008 Zaagkii Project pixs with Sarah Swanson

Sarah Swanson

Sarah is a NMU student leader, volunteers for numerous nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute Projects including the Zaagkii Project, Northern Michigan University (NMU) Student leader, Lutheran Campus Ministry leader including visited Nicaragua and educated Americans on importance of fair trade with Nicaraguan coffee farmers and others, served as NMU EarthKeeper (NMU EK) Student Team project director.

1-906-399-7113

email NMU Lutheran Campus Ministry

Beekeeper. Beekeeper Jim Hayward,Negaunee Twonship,Apiary,honeybees,Amanda Emerson,Tanya Nelson,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Michigan,Upper Peninsula,Colony Collapse Disorder,bees,pollinators Amanda Emerson,Eco-Christmas,Northern Michigan University,Peter White Public Library,Christmas,2009 Photobucket Photobucket Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Amanda Emerson

Amanda is a NMU student leader, and volunteers for numerous nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute projects including the Zaagkii Project and serves as project coordinator for the NMU EarthKeeper Student team

847-791-5693

——

Keweenaw Bay Indian Community,KBIC

Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC)

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KBIC Tribal Council President Warren C. “Chris” Swartz Jr.

KBIC Vice Chair Susan LaFernier

906-353-6623

Todd Warner, Director of KBIC Natural Resource Department (NRD)

906-524-5757

Photobucket Photobucket

Evelyn Ravindran, KBIC NRD Natural Resources Specialist

KBIC NRD employees help build butterfly houses in 2008:

Keweenaw Bay Indian Community,KBIC,tribal youth,youth,bees,butterflies,butterfly houses,bee,2008 Keweenaw Bay Indian Community,KBIC,tribal youth,youth,bees,butterflies,butterfly houses,bee,2008 Photobucket Photobucket

Katie Kruse, NRD Environment specialist

Char Beesley, Environment Specialist

Kit Laux, NRD Water Quality Specialist

Kim Klopstein, one of the summer youth supervisors for the KBIC Summer Youth Program

906-201-0020

NMU Center for Native American Studies banner/llogo

Northern Michigan University Center for Native American Studies (CNAS)

Photobucket Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Presque Isle,April Lindala,Jan Schukltz,kids,USFS,United States Forest Service,NMU,Northern Michigan University Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket

April Lindala, Director

112F Whitman Hall

906-227-1397 (office)

906-227-1396 (fax)

Zaagkii Headshots

NMU CNAS Professor Kenneth Pitawanakwat, Anishinaabemowin Instructor

112D Whitman Hall

Phone: 906-227-1504

Fax: 906-227-1396

E-mail: kpitawan@nmu.edu

Biographical profile

Northern Michigan University,NMU CNAS Professor Adriana Greci Green,NMU,NMU Center for Native American Studies,Professor Adriana Greci Green,Zaagkii Project,Native American

NMU CNAS Asst. Professor Adriana Greci Green

112C Whitman Hall

Phone: 906-227-2374

Fax: 906-227-1396

E-mail: agreen@nmu.edu

Biographical profile

NMU students Zaagkii Project presentation to USFS in Milwaukee

NMU Brochure/report on Zaagkii Project: Seven edible and medicinal native plants used by Ojibway traditional culture in Michigans Upper Peninsula

2009 Zaagkii Project Levi and Leona Tadgerson Native American Teens 7-7-09 2009 Zaagkii Project Levi and Leona Tadgerson Native American Teens 7-7-09 2009 Zaagkii Project Levi and Leona Tadgerson Native American Teens 7-7-09 Photobucket

NMU CNAS Zaagkii Project interns: Levi Tadgerson of Negaunee and sister, Leora Tadgerson of Marquette, members of Bay Mills Indian Community

906-360-0451 (Levi)

USFS Zaagkii Project contacts:

Jane Cliff, USFS Public Relations in Milwaukee

414-297-3664

Angie Lucas, contractor, Hiawatha National Forest Greenhouse Manager

Photobucket Photobucket

906-228-8491

Terry Miller, forest botanist at the Hiawatha National Forest Office in Escanaba, MI

U.S. Forest Service success story,USFS,United States Forest Service,U.S. Department of Agriculture,Monarch,butterfly,butterflies,Marquette,Michigan,National Monarch Butterfly Workshop,Hiawatha National Forest,forest,botanist,botany,Deb LeBlanc,Deb Le Blanc,Terry Miller,plug,Escanaba

Botanist Terry Miller is pictured planting plugs in this USFS photo

USDA USFS Hiawatha Forest District

2727 North Lincoln Road

Escanaba, MI

49825

906-786-4062

906-789-3319

Hiawatha National Forest website

Hiawatha National Forest Service offices

Deb Le Blanc, WestSide Plant Ecologist at the Hiawatha National Forest office in Munising, MI

(Does Monarch Workshops)

Hiawatha National Forest hosted a National Monarch Butterfly Workshop during June 2008 in Marquette, MI

U.S. Forest Service success story,USFS,United States Forest Service,U.S. Department of Agriculture,Monarch,butterfly,butterflies,Marquette,Michigan,National Monarch Butterfly Workshop,Hiawatha National Forest,forest,botanist,botany,Deb LeBlanc,Deb Le Blanc,Terry Miller,plug,Escanaba

Deb Le Blanc, USDA

400 Munising Ave.

Munising, MI

49862

email Deb Le Blanc

906-387-2512 ext. 19

U.S. Forest Service success story,USFS,United States Forest Service,U.S. Department of Agriculture,Monarch,butterfly,butterflies,Marquette,Michigan,National Monarch Butterfly Workshop,Hiawatha National Forest,forest,botanist,botany,Deb LeBlanc,Deb Le Blanc,Terry Miller,plug,Escanaba

The Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation:

The Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis Fitzhugh (Miller) Reynolds,Mrs. Maxwell K. Reynolds,Jr.,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette founding father Peter White,Peter White,Joan (Reynolds) Miller,Don Miller,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Manoomin Project,bees,butterflies,wild rice,philanthropy,philanthropist,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation Inc.,Wells Fargo Bank

Phyllis Fitzhugh (Miller) Reynolds (Mrs. Maxwell K. Reynolds, Jr.) of Marquette, Mich., passed away Nov. 10, 2009 at the age of 89.

She was preceded in death by her husband, Maxwell, the great-grandson of Marquette founding father Peter White, in 1988

CTI honors Joan (Reynolds) and Don Miller

Joan is one of four daughters of Phyllis and Max Reynolds.

The Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis Fitzhugh (Miller) Reynolds,Mrs. Maxwell K. Reynolds,Jr.,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette founding father Peter White,Peter White,Joan (Reynolds) Miller,Don Miller,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Manoomin Project,bees,butterflies,wild rice,philanthropy,philanthropist,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation Inc.,Wells Fargo Bank The Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis Fitzhugh (Miller) Reynolds,Mrs. Maxwell K. Reynolds,Jr.,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette founding father Peter White,Peter White,Joan (Reynolds) Miller,Don Miller,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Manoomin Project,bees,butterflies,wild rice,philanthropy,philanthropist,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation Inc.,Wells Fargo Bank

Alyson “Aly” Luff (left) of Marquette and her mother Joan Miller at the 2009 Cedar Tree Institute MidSummer Festival in Marquette.

Alyson has taken photos of numerous Cedar Tree Institute projects and events.

The Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis Fitzhugh (Miller) Reynolds,Mrs. Maxwell K. Reynolds,Jr.,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette founding father Peter White,Peter White,Joan (Reynolds) Miller,Don Miller,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Manoomin Project,bees,butterflies,wild rice,philanthropy,philanthropist,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation Inc.,Wells Fargo Bank The Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis Fitzhugh (Miller) Reynolds,Mrs. Maxwell K. Reynolds,Jr.,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette founding father Peter White,Peter White,Joan (Reynolds) Miller,Don Miller,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Manoomin Project,bees,butterflies,wild rice,philanthropy,philanthropist,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation Inc.,Wells Fargo Bank

Joan and Don Miller attend the 2009 CTI MidSummer Festival.

The Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis Fitzhugh (Miller) Reynolds,Mrs. Maxwell K. Reynolds,Jr.,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette founding father Peter White,Peter White,Joan (Reynolds) Miller,Don Miller,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Manoomin Project,bees,butterflies,wild rice,philanthropy,philanthropist,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation Inc.,Wells Fargo Bank

Joan Miller (center) with other Zaagkii Project supporters at the 2008 and 2009 CTI MidSummer festival.

Cool Cities website and the Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation

Websites that list philanthropy organizations including the Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation

Phyllis And Max Reynolds Foundation Inc

Box 580 Trust Dept. Wells Fargo Bank

101 W Washington St

Marquette, MI

49855-0580

Alyson Luff,Aly Luff,Phyllis And Max Reynolds Foundation,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,nonprofit,Cedar Tree Institute,photographer,suicide prevention,American Foundation for Suicide Prevention,AFSP,Out of the Darkness Community Walks,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette 2010 Out of the Darkness Community Walk,2010 Out of the Darkness Community Walk,Marquette Commons,teen suicide,teens,youth suicide,suicide

Alyson “Aly” Luff is the granddaughter of the late Phyllis And Max Reynolds, whose foundation supports the Zaagkii Project and other nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute initiatives.

A Zaagkii Project photographer, Aly is active in suicide prevention organizations including the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) and its annual Out of the Darkness Community Walks.

Alyson Luff,Aly Luff,Phyllis And Max Reynolds Foundation,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,nonprofit,Cedar Tree Institute,photographer,suicide prevention,American Foundation for Suicide Prevention,AFSP,Out of the Darkness Community Walks,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette 2010 Out of the Darkness Community Walk,2010 Out of the Darkness Community Walk,Marquette Commons,teen suicide,teens,youth suicide,suicide

Alyson Luff,Aly Luff,Phyllis And Max Reynolds Foundation,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,nonprofit,Cedar Tree Institute,photographer,suicide prevention,American Foundation for Suicide Prevention,AFSP,Out of the Darkness Community Walks,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette 2010 Out of the Darkness Community Walk,2010 Out of the Darkness Community Walk,Marquette Commons,teen suicide,teens,youth suicide,suicide

Out of the Darkness Community Walks on myspace

Alyson Luff,Aly Luff,Phyllis And Max Reynolds Foundation,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,nonprofit,Cedar Tree Institute,photographer,suicide prevention,American Foundation for Suicide Prevention,AFSP,Out of the Darkness Community Walks,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette 2010 Out of the Darkness Community Walk,2010 Out of the Darkness Community Walk,Marquette Commons,teen suicide,teens,youth suicide,suicide

The 2010 Marquette, MI Out of the Darkness Community Walk will be held on Sept 18, 2010 starting at the Marquette Commons

9 a.m. Registration

10 a.m. Walk begins

For more information on the Marquette Out of the Darkness Community Walk email Alyson Luff or call 1-906-235-1969

——-

The Kaufman Foundation in Marquette, MI

City of Marquette names Kaufman Sports Complex

Kaufman Auditorium in Marquette, MI and related Foundation projects

Kaufman Foundation helps youth hockey

Kaufman Foundation and Graveraet School G.R.E.A.T. Project

Kaufman Foundation helps city of Marquette

——-

Marquette Community Foundation

Marquette Community Foundation

P.O. Box 37

401 East Fair Avenue

Marquette, MI 49855-2951

1-906-226-7666 (office)

1-906-226-2104 (fax)

Become a fan of the Marquette Community Foundation on Facebook

Marquette Community Foundation staff

Dr. Carole L. Touchinski, CFRM

Executive Director

Linda Vallier

FIMS Operator

Dani Thoune

Programs Director

Photobucket

Marquette Community Foundation Boards of Directors:

President Robert Cowell

Vice President Mark Canale

Treasurer John Marshall

Secretary Maura Davenport

Board members:

Craig Stien

Stu Bradley

Marilyn Andrew

Michael Roy

John Maki

Don Mourand

Katy Martin

John Lenten

Roger Zappa

——-

M.E. Davenport Foundation logo,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,philanthropy,philanthropist,bee,bees,pollinators,pollinate,butterfly,butterflies,mason bee,honeybee

The M.E. Davenport Foundation

415 E. Fulton St. SE

Warren Hall

Grand Rapids, MI.

49503

1-616-732-1098

M.E. Davenport Foundation supports Cedar Tree Institute initiatives like the Zaagkii Project and native species plants

Davenport University

The M.E. Davenport Foundation Board of Directors:

Margaret Moceri, President

Gregory Moceri, Vice-President/Treasurer

Mary Sneden Sullivan, Secretary

Marcia Sneden, Trustee

Donald Maine, Trustee

James Setchfield, M.D., Trustee

——-

Rick Pietila:

Rick Pietila does Tai Chi July 2009

email martial artist Rick Pietila of Marquette, MI

1-906-362-1907

Rick Pietila does Tai Chi July 2009 Rick Pietila does Tai Chi July 2009

Pietilla is an instructor of San Shou, Tai Chi and other martial arts.

Rick Pietila does Tai Chi July 2009 Rick Pietila does Tai Chi July 2009

Rick Pietila’s other ongoing amazing adventures include traveling with several legendary Rock and Roll groups including being a guitar tech for the band Boston and traveled into South America with the band Stryper.

Photobucket Rick Pietila does Tai Chi July 2009

Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute Winter 2008 newsletter that mentions Rick Pietila

Rick Pietila does Tai Chi July 2009

Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute Winter 2009 newsletter that mentions Rick Pietila

Zaagkii Project story in Sept. 2009 Marquette Monthly

Zaagkii Project videos on youtube

Zaagkii Project videos on bliptv

Zaagkii Project wordpress blog

United State Forest Service (USFS) Celebrating Wildflowers and Pollinators websites

Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute in Marquette, MI

Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC)

Marquette County Juvenile Court

Marquette County Juvenile Court and Project WEAVE

Jim Rule at Hayward bee farm Photobucket Jim Rule at Hayward bee farm

Jim Rule, a child care counselor at Marquette County Youth Home, is pictured on June 25, 2009 on a Zaagkii Project outing to the apiary owned by beekeeper Jim Hayward

The Butterfly Lady:

Susan Payant,monarch butterfly,monarch butterflies,butterfly,butterflies,Marquette,Michigan,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,pollinators,protecting pollinators,viceroy,U.S. Forest Service,USFS,Mourning Cloak,Upper Peninsula Susan Payant,monarch butterfly,monarch butterflies,butterfly,butterflies,Marquette,Michigan,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,pollinators,protecting pollinators,viceroy,U.S. Forest Service,USFS,Mourning Cloak,Upper Peninsula Susan Payant,monarch butterfly,monarch butterflies,butterfly,butterflies,Marquette,Michigan,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,pollinators,protecting pollinators,viceroy,U.S. Forest Service,USFS,Mourning Cloak,Upper Peninsula Susan Payant,monarch butterfly,monarch butterflies,butterfly,butterflies,Marquette,Michigan,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,pollinators,protecting pollinators,viceroy,U.S. Forest Service,USFS,Mourning Cloak,Upper Peninsula Susan Payant,monarch butterfly,monarch butterflies,butterfly,butterflies,Marquette,Michigan,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,pollinators,protecting pollinators,viceroy,U.S. Forest Service,USFS,Mourning Cloak,Upper Peninsula Susan Payant,monarch butterfly,monarch butterflies,butterfly,butterflies,Marquette,Michigan,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,pollinators,protecting pollinators,viceroy,U.S. Forest Service,USFS,Mourning Cloak,Upper Peninsula Susan Payant,monarch butterfly,monarch butterflies,butterfly,butterflies,Marquette,Michigan,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,pollinators,protecting pollinators,viceroy,U.S. Forest Service,USFS,Mourning Cloak,Upper Peninsula

“The Butterfly Lady” Susan (David) Payant of Marquette, MI

email Susan Payant

1-906-226-8890

Borealis Seed Company

Big Bay, Michigan

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Run by mother-daughter team of Judy Keast and Suzanne Rabitaille cultivating about 5 acres of a 20-acre spread three miles south of Big Bay, Michigan.

http://www.ltbbodawa-nsn.gov/index.html

Dancing Crane Farm:

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Owned by Natasha and David Gill

Dancing Crane Farm has naturally grown and raised vegetables, flowers and more on 20 acres with almost five acres cultvated

Natasha and David Gill

Dancing Crane Farm

348 Lawson Road

Skandia, MI 49885

906-942-7975

email the organic Dancing Crane Farm

info@dancingcranefarm.com

http://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/internships/farmdetails.php?FarmName=&City=&State=MI&Keyword=&allDate=0&page=1&FarmID=1957

Assorted vegetables, herbs,flowers,and seedlings

Custom workshops, ongoing classes, farm tours, apprenticeships, volunteer opportunities, and an annual Harvest Party open to the public.

Produce can be purchased at the Marquette, Gwinn, and Munising Farmers Markets and at the Dancing Crane Farm.

Open June-October.

Beekeeper Dr. Jim Hayward:

Zaagkii Headshots Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Jim Hayward Bee Farm Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Photobucket Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Dr. Jim and Martha Hayward

103A Buffalo Rd.

Negaunee, MI

49866

906-475-7582

email Negaunee, MI beekeeper Dr. Jim Hayward

Beekeepers Lee Ossenheimer, Dr. Lisa Long:

Gather’n Greens

Negaunee Township, Michigan

Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer,Lauren OssenheimerGather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer,Lauren OssenheimerPhotobucketGather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer,Lauren Ossenheimer

906-475-9338

(no website yet)

Owned by Lee Ossenheimer and his wife, Dr. Lisa Long in Negaunee Township, MI along the Dead River.

Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer,Lauren Ossenheimer Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer,Lauren Ossenheimer Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer,Lauren Ossenheimer Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer,Lauren Ossenheimer Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer,Lauren Ossenheimer Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer,Lauren Ossenheimer

The couple raise bees, make honey, grow mushrooms and grow seedlings for transplanting like peppers, tomatoes and about numerous herbs such as basil.

The couple has three children active in their nature-oriented, organic business:

Jesse Ossenheimer, 8; Lauren Ossenheimer, 5; and Alex Ossenheimer, 4.

Beekeeper Jon Kniskern:

Photobucket

Jon Kniskern

Marquette, MI

Beekeeper Jon Kniskern is quoted in a March 3, 2009 article on a University of Minnesota annual “Short Course” entitled Beekeeping in Northern Climates at Borlaug Hall on the St. Paul campus

The story was published in the Minnesota Daily newspaper in Minneapolis/St. Paul

Zaagkii Headshots Photobucket Photobucket Upper Peninsula Children's Museum,Jim Edwards,Nheena Weyer Ittner,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,bee hive,bee,butterfly,monarch,honeybee,Marquette,Michigan Photobucket Upper Peninsula Children's Museum,Jim Edwards,Nheena Weyer Ittner,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,bee hive,bee,butterfly,monarch,honeybee,Marquette,Michigan Photobucket

Jim Edwards at the Upper Peninsula Children’s Museum who is in charge of “General Programming and Explainers Director”

Jim Edwards,Upper Peninsula Children's Museum,Monarch,butterfly,U.P. Children's Museum,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project Photobucket

Edwards teamed with the Zaagkii Project students to build a giant monarch butterfly in 2008 and a big bee hive in 2009 using art-related items at the museum in Marquette, MI

Upper Peninsula Children’s Museum

123 W. Baraga Avenue

Marquette, MI

49855

1-906-226-3911 (office)

1-906- 226-7065 (fax)

email Nheena Weyer Ittner, director of the U.P. Children’s Museum

email Jim Edwards, museum General Programming and Explainers Director

NativeVillage.org,Gina Blotz,Native Village Publications

American Indian,Native American,youth,bee,bees,Marquette,Michigan,Upper Peninsula,Baraga,teens,teenagers,pollinators,pollen,pollinating,butterflies,butterfly,honeybees,bumblebees,environment,native plants,species extinction

Zaagkii Project banner graphics by Gina Boltz, the director and editor of Native Village Publications including NativeVillage.org and a champion and fighter for Native American and Indigenous youth causes

Nativevillage.org main Zaagkii Page

NativeVillage.org,Gina Blotz,Native Village Publications

The International Council of Thirteen Indigenous Grandmothers: Internet Youth Forum on NativeVillage.org

NativeVillage.org 2009 Zaagkii Story and photos

NativeVillage.org 2008 Zaagkii Story and photos

Zaagkii Project Credit for music used in videos:

Music on Zaagkii Project videos courtesy of Chicago area band Dragon Fire Parade, which has Upper Peninsula roots

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

Photo caption:

Members of the Chicago area band Dragon Fire Parade pictured are Andy Wicklund (upper left), Chris Hammond (upper right), Peter Nemanich (lower left) and Tim Obert (lower right).

Dragon Fire Parade:

Andy Wicklund, Guitar

Tim Obert, Guitar

Peter Nemanich, Bass

Chris Hammond, Drums

email Dragon Fire Parade

Cedar Tree Institute,Zaagkii Project,band,Terracotta half-life,Jerry Kippola,Guitar,Aaron Kippola,Alto Saxophone,Percussion,Obadiah Metivier,Bass Guitar,Vocals,Jennie Peano,Steve Leuthold,Baritone Saxaphone,Tenor Saxophone,Flute,Dan Schaefer,Drums,Emmanuel Kawedi,Congas

Official band of the Cedar Tree Institute/Zaagkii Project annual Midsummer Festival:

Terracotta half-life

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

Terracotta half-life biography

Bio about the one and only Obadiah Metivier, a band member, overall techie genious and Zaagkii Project volunteer webmaster and technical guru

email Obadiah Metiver

Jerry Kippola, Guitar

Aaron Kippola, Alto Saxophone, Percussion

Obadiah Metivier, Bass Guitar, Vocals, Percussion

Jennie Peano, Vocals, Percussion

Steve Leuthold, Baritone and Tenor Saxophone, Flute

Dan Schaefer, Drums

email Emmanuel Kawedi, Congas, Percussion, Vocals

Alumni – Keyboards, Guitars, Drums, Sax, Trumpet, Congas, Timbales, etc.

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

Upcoming Shows:

Wed 2/10/2010: Upfront

Fri 2/26/2010: Harley’s Lounge

Fri 3/12/2010: Marquette Food Co-op Meeting of Owners

Wed 3/24/2010: Upfront

Tue 7/13/2010: Menominee Summer Concert Series

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

Marquette Mining Journal feature story #2 on Zaagkii Project on 12-13-08 about the first year of protecting pollinators

Marquette Mining Journal feature story #1 on Zaagkii Project on 7-14-08 about 208 annual Cedar Tree Institute annual Mid-Summer Festival in Marquette, MI

News From Indian Country (NFIC) feature story on Zaagkii Project

Indian Country Today feature stories on Zaagkii Project:

Part 1: Pollinator Preservation

Part 2: Sand Point Restoration

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NAISA,Native American and Indigenous Studies Association,Tuscon,Arizona,Zaagkii Project,Leora Tadgerson,Professor Adriana Greci Green,NMU,CNAS,Students,Northern Michigan University,The University of Arizona,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project

Zaagkii Project intern Leora Tadgerson to participate in a roundtable at the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association (NAISA) 2010 National Conference on May 20-22, 2010 in Tuscon, AZ

Zaagkii Project and Northern Michigan Center for Native American Studies (NMU CNAS) participants:

NAISA,Native American and Indigenous Studies Association,Tuscon,Arizona,Zaagkii Project,Leora Tadgerson,Professor Adriana Greci Green,NMU,CNAS,Students,Northern Michigan University,The University of Arizona,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project

NAISA,Native American and Indigenous Studies Association,Tuscon,Arizona,Zaagkii Project,Leora Tadgerson,Professor Adriana Greci Green,NMU,CNAS,Students,Northern Michigan University,The University of Arizona,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project

NMU CNAS Conference info:

SATURDAY, MAY 22, 2010

12:00-1:45 p.m.

118 ROUNDTABLE:

“Engaging Students through Community Action and Service”

Organizer & Chair:

Adriana Greci Green, Northern Michigan University

Participants include:

Leora Tadgerson, Zaagkii Project intern from Northern Michigan University Center for Native American Studies

Damien Lee, Trent University, Canada

Nicholas Estes, University of South Dakota

Karla Tait, University of South Dakota

Leya Hale, University of South Dakota

Linc Kesler, University of British Columbia, Canada

NAISA 2010 Conference Program details

Preliminary Daily Schedule

The NAISA 2010 Conference is sponsored by the American Indian Studies at The University of Arizona

NAISA,Native American and Indigenous Studies Association,Tuscon,Arizona,Zaagkii Project,Leora Tadgerson,Professor Adriana Greci Green,NMU,CNAS,Students,Northern Michigan University,The University of Arizona,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project

NAISA staff photo

Robert Warrior, NAISA President 2009-2010

email organizers of the NAISA 2010 Conference

Contact information:

Sunny Lybarger

1-520-626-7695

Tsianina Lomawaima

1-520-621-5083

Hotel registration info and the deadline for NAISA Group Room Rate April 18, 2010

1-520-742-6000

Westin La Paloma

3800 East Sunrise Drive

Tucson, AZ

85718

Native Times newspaper aka Native American Times Zaagkii Project pollinators story

Turtle Island News:

http://www.turtleisland.org/discussion/viewtopic.php?p=9683#9683

Marquette Monthly Nov. 2008 (scroll down):

http://www.mmnow.com/z_current_a/b/c/city_notes.html

Tree Hugger: (This article appeared on over 1,000 websites)

http://www.treehugger.com/files/2008/10/zaagkii–wings-seeds-project.php

Zaagkii KBIC newsletter (scroll down to page 4):

http://www.kbic-nsn.gov/files/newsletter/Sept_2008.pdf

Sault Ste. Marie Band of Chippewa Story on Zaagkii Project (Scroll down to page 7)

http://www.saulttribe.com/index2.php?option=com_docman&task=doc_view&gid=959&Itemid=266

Great Story in Native Villge Web:

http://www.nativevillage.org/Messages%20from%20the%20People/MesPeo%20KBIC%20Tribal%20Youth%20Zaagkii%20Project/kbic_tribal_youth_protect_pollin1.htm

Earth Times – London:

http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/show/michigan-teens-native-american-youth,593342.shtml

Good News Network National Newspaper:

http://www.goodnewsnetwork.org

To see story – sign up for free 30 day trial by click on headline of story

Monarch Watch:

Author Lynn M. Rosenblatt,Monarch Magic,Monarch Magic!,book,author,monarch,butterfly,buterflies,monarch butterfly,Lynn M. Rosenblatt

Monarch Author Lynn M. Rosenblatt (above with children) who wrote the book MONARCH MAGIC!

Photobucket

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The Pollinator Partnership

c/o The Coevolution Institute

Laurie Davies Adams, Executive Director

423 Washington St, 5th Fl

San Francisco, CA

94111-2339

1-415-362-1137 (office)

1-415-362-3070 (fax)

Pollinator Partnership,pollinatorpartnership.org,pollinators,bees,butterflies,pollinate

Pollinator Partnership

Pollinator Week is June 21-27, 2010

The fourth annual National Pollinator Week will be held from June 21-27, 2010.

Think about an event at your school, garden, church, store, etc.

Pollinators positively effect all our lives – let’s save them and celebrate them!

Pollinator Partnership,pollinatorpartnership.org,pollinators,bees,butterflies,pollinate

Pollinator Partnership Movie

Pollinator News from Pollinator Partnership

email the Pollinator Partnership

North American Pollinator Protection Campaign

Working to protect the pollinators of the North American continent

North American Pollinator Protection Campaign #2 (NAPPC)

emails:

info@NAPPC.org; LDA@pollinator.org

415-362-3070 (fax)

Lots of different handouts & ideas for National Pollinator Week

——-

Numerous Monarch related links:

http://www.kidsgardening.com/pollinator/curriculum/resources.php

http://www.insecta-inspecta.com/butterflies/monarch/index.html

http://www.nhptv.org/natureworks/monarch.htm

http://www.learner.org/jnorth/monarch

U.S. Department of Agriculture Headquarters and “The People’s Garden” in Washington, D.C. – Bringing Nature into the Public Realm: Green The Grounds

Feature stories on the People’s Garden in Washington, D.C. featured on discovery.com that is Bringing Nature into the Public Realm: Green The Grounds at the U.S. Department of Agriculture Headquarters:

Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) story on ground broken on USDA USFS “The People’s Garden” in Washington, D.C.

USFS The Peoples Garden in Washington, D.C.

USFS News Release on The Peoples Garden

USFS sustainable operations information and links to articles including The Peoples Garden

Wikipedia on Monarch butterflies and Lepidotera migration, a phenomenon where butterflies or moths migrate over long distances to areas where they cannot settle for long periods of time.

Photo by Mila Zinkova of Monarch butterflies migration and cluster on Nov. 25, 2007 in Santa Cruz to spend a winter via Wikipedia Creative Commons. During migration Monarch butterflies travel up to three thousand miles.

email Mila Zinkova

Photograph by Wikipedia user Bfpage of some of the overwintering monarch butterflies in Feb. 2000 at a preserve outside of Angangueo, Mexico. One tree is completely covered in butterflies.

Artwork of Migrating butterflies aka Lepidoptera migration art

Artistic picture by Pilar Murillo of Spain

Wikipedia username: Pilar

flickr username: izarbeltza

Wikipedia on Goldenrod

Goldenrod photo by Kurt Stueber aka Kurt Stüber via Wikipedia creative commons

email Kurt Stueber

Goldenrod Photo by Huw Williams – Wikipedia username Huwmanbeing

Goldenrod flowers photographed in western Fountain County, Indiana on September 15, 207 via Wikipedia creative commons

Goldenrod and visiting Cerceris wasp by Wiki user Hardyplants via Wikipedia creative commons

Goldenrod Photo by Georg Slickers taken on August 15, 2005 in Berlin, Germany via Wikipedia creative commons

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Wikipedia on Monarchs

Wikipedia page with a Female Monarch photo in May 2007 by Kenneth Dwain Harrelson

Wikipedia page with Male Monarch photo by Derek Ramsey (Wikipedia user name Ram-Man) at the Tyler Arboretum

Bees disappearing around the world:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pollinator_decline

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bees_and_toxic_chemicals

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colony_Collapse_Disorder

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pesticide_toxicity_to_bees

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imidacloprid_effects_on_bee_population

http://www.burtsbees.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ContentView?contentPageId=531&catalogId=10051&storeId=10001&langId=-1

http://www.polinator.org

http://www.vanishingbees.com

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diseases_of_the_honey_bee

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endangered_arthropod

Wikipedia Honeybee Photos by Björn Appel, Wikipedia Username Warden.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Warden

Edit by Waugsberg (cropped)

A honeybee on an apiary, cooling by flapping its wings in Tübingen-Hagelloch.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c5/Honeybee-cooling_cropped.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/df/Honeybee-cooling.jpg

Wiki Bee photos by Waugsberg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Waugsberg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/dc/Biene_88a.jpg

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:Biene_88a.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b8/Bienen_im_Flug_52e.jpg

Bumblebees: Space For Nature Garden biodiversity forum

http://www.wildlife-gardening.org.uk/default.asp?gallery=Galleries\Animals\Insects\Bumblebees\bombus-pascuorum-040616.xml

Bumblebee Photo Copyright Richard Burkmar 2004. Permission is hereby granted for anyone to use this image for non-commercial purposes which are of benefit to the natural environment.

Richard Burkmar (editor of Space for Nature) graduated from the University College of Cardiff in 1984 with a degree in zoology and a PhD in avian ecology in 1989. He currently works for Merseyside Environmental Advisory Service where he manages the North Merseyside Biodiversity Action Plan (Liverpool, St. Helens, Knowsley and Sefton Boroughs).

Bumblebees: Buckingham Nurseries and Garden Centre

http://www.buckingham-nurseries.co.uk/acatalog/bumblebees.html

Bumblebee photo by Oxford Bee Company/Buckingham Nurseries and Garden Centre

Bumblebees by Christopher O’Toole

http://www.buckingham-nurseries.co.uk/acatalog/Index_Pollination_Bees_27.html#33171

Chris O’Toole is the director of Bee Systematics and Biology Unit at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History.

He has written many books on insect natural history including Bees of the World and Alien Empire.

Pictures and information provided by the Oxford Bee Company & Buckingham Nurseries and Garden Centre website

Wind Pollinated plants like Rye are important but are not food sources for pollinators:

Wind Pollinated Rye photo by Paul Billiet and Shirley Burchill

http://www.saburchill.com/chapters/chap0044.html

Wikipedia on Pollination:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pollination

Photo by By Debi Vort (Wikipedia Username Debivort) of an Andrena bee collects pollen among the stamens of a rose. The female carpel structure appears rough and globular to the left. The bee’s stash of pollen is on its hind leg.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Bee_pollenating_a_rose.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Debivort

A European honey bee collects nectar, while pollen collects on its body.

A European honey bee (Apis mellifera) extracts nectar from an Aster flower using its proboscis. Tiny hairs covering the bee’s body maintain a slight electrostatic charge, causing pollen from the flower’s anthers to stick to the bee, allowing for pollination when the bee moves on to another flower.

Photo by John Severns (Wikipedia username Severnjc)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:European_honey_bee_extracts_nectar.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Severnjc

Blueberries being pollinated by bumblebees. Bumblebee hives need to be bought each year as the queens must hibernate (unlike honey bees). They are used nonetheless as they offer advantages with certain fruits as blueberries (such as the fact that they are active even at colder outdoor ambient temperature) A picture showing blueberry pollination by bumblebees, aswell as the system of furrow irrigation using siphon tubes. Pictures were taken at “blueberry fields”, Koersel, Belgium.

A picture showing blueberry pollination by bumblebees, as well as the system of furrow irrigation using siphon tubes. Pictures were taken in July 2008 at “blueberry fields”, Koersel, Belgium.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:BlueberryPollinationByBumblebees.jpg

Photo by Kristof Van der Poorten Wikipedia username KVDP

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:KVDP

http://kvdp.blogspot.com

http://healingweb.blogspot.com

Environmental Health Science of Columbia University

60 Haven Ave.

Room 100

New York, NY

10032

http://www.mailman.hs.columbia.edu/ehs/index.html

Wikipedia on Cultivars & Hybrids:

A cultivar is a particular variety of a plant species or hybrid that is being cultivated and/or is recognised as a cultivar under the ICNCP. The concept of cultivar is driven by pragmatism, and serves the practical needs of horticulture, agriculture, forestry, etc.

The plant chosen as a cultivar may have been bred deliberately, selected from plants in cultivation, or discovered in the wild. Cultivars can be asexual clones or seed-raised. Clones are genetically identical and will appear so when grown under the same conditions.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cultivar

Viola ‘Clear Crystals Apricot’, a hybrid cross viola (Viola x hybrida), Victoria, Australia. Wikipedia photo by John O’Neill (Wikipedia username Jjron)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User_talk:Jjron

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special:EmailUser/Jjron

Bee Movie:

http://www.beemovie.com

Created in 2007 by Jerry Seinfeld and DreamWorks Animation

Keweenaw Peninsula: Michigan’s Copper Country:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copper_mining_in_Michigan

http://www.unr.edu/sb204/geology/westernh.html

West Virginia White Butterfly & killer Garlic Mustard Seed plants:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Virginia_White

http://www.cbgarden.org/blog/index.php/tag/west-virginia-white-butterfly

http://leapbio.org/west_virginia_white.php

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/5a/3402_white_WV_ws.jpg

West Virginia White, Pieris virginiensis on wild mustard Photo by Randy L Emmitt

http://www.rlephoto.com/butterflies/white_wv01.htm

Butterflies/Moths:

The Butterfly Site:

http://www.thebutterflysite.com

Children’s butterfly links:

http://www.monarchbutterflyusa.com/Links.htm

Butterfly Encounters:

http://www.butterflyencounters.com

Butterflys and Moths of North America:

http://www.butterfliesandmoths.org

Opler, Paul A., Harry Pavulaan, Ray E. Stanford, Michael Pogue, coordinators. 2006. Butterflies and Moths of North America. Bozeman, MT: NBII Mountain Prairie Information Node. http://www.butterfliesandmoths.org

Deciduous forests:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deciduous

Viceroys:

Viceroy Butterfly mimics Monarchs

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viceroy_butterfly

Wikipedia Viceroy photo by Piccolo “Pic” Namek

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:PiccoloNamek

Viceroy:

http://www.nhptv.org/natureworks/viceroy.htm

Photo by William T. Hark

Butterfly & endangered species hibernacula:

http://www.fws.gov/midwest/Endangered/lists/michigan-cty.html

http://www.naturenorth.com/summer/bgarden/bttgrdF.html

http://entweb.clemson.edu/museum/buttrfly/local/bfly12.htm

http://actazool.nhmus.hu/48/konvicka.pdf

http://earthcaretaker.com/naturalization/llamb.html

Mourning Cloaks aka Morning Cloaks:

http://www.sierrapotomac.org/W_Needham/MourningCloak_060319.htm

http://www.bentler.us/eastern-washington/insects/mourning-cloak.aspx

http://www.ivyhall.district96.k12.il.us/4th/kkhp/1insects/mourningcloak.html

http://www.naturenorth.com/spring/bug/mcloak/Fmcloak.html

Mason bees – bee houses in wood:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mason_bee

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6c/Osmia_rufa_couple_(aka).jpg

Photo of an Red Mason Bee couple (osmia rufa) by André Karwath of German Wikipedia also known as AKA (André Karwath):

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Aka

Mason Bees:

http://www.farminfo.org/bees/mason-bees.htm

http://www.everythingabout.net/articles/biology/animals/arthropods/insects/bees/mason_bee

Photo by Kim Taylor of Bruce Coleman Inc.

http://www.masonbeehomes.com/bee_houses.php

http://www.pollinator.com/mason_homes.htm

http://www.insectpix.net/Homes_for_bees.htm

Brownfield sites:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brownfields

http://ncrs.fs.fed.us/4902/focus/restoration/brownfield

Mass Mill – copper processing waste (stamp sands) cleanup:

(search for KBIC in following document)

http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/programs/tribalgov/ImprovingPartnerships.pdf

http://www.uprcd.org/projects.asp

http://www.upea.com/filesfordownloading/Baragadraft.pdf

Manoomin Project:

Manoomin Project: Restoring wild rice to seven remote Upper Peninusla lakes, stream as students planted over 1 ton of wild rice seeds with help from elders with the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community

Another collaboration between the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute and the Keweenaw bay Indian Community

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

http://www.indiancountry.com/content.cfm?id=1096416108

http://www.cedartreeinstitute.org/wildrice2007.html

http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/show/news_press_release,215966.%20shtml

http://blog.americanfeast.com/indigenous_food

http://www.goodnewsdaily.com/show_story.php?ID=3500

Manoomin Project Videos:

http://blip.tv/file/549632

http://blip.tv/file/341528

Manoomin Project counselor Dave Anthony, who belongs to the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa (Ottawa) Indian, and Northern Michigan University Center for Native American studies:

http://webb.nmu.edu/Centers/NativeAmericanStudies/SiteSections/Calendar/IEDSHighlights.shtml

http://webb.nmu.edu/Centers/NativeAmericanStudies/SiteSections/AboutUs/AboutUs.shtml

Dreamcatcher:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dreamcatcher_(Native_American)

http://www.dreamcatcher.com/home.php

Northern white cedar:

http://forestry.about.com/library/tree/blntwh.htm

More on honeybee decline:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pollinator_decline

http://www.masterbeekeeper.org/pdf/pollination.pdf

The Value of Honey Bees As Pollinators of U.S. Crops in 2000 by Drs. Roger Morse and Nicholas Calderone of Cornell University (2000) :

Colony Collapse Disorder (or CCD) is a poorly understood phenomenon in which worker bees from a beehive or Western honey bee colony abruptly disappear. While such disappearances have occurred throughout the history of apiculture, the term Colony Collapse Disorder was first applied to a drastic rise in the number of disappearances of Western honey bee colonies in North America in late 2006.

European beekeepers observed a similar phenomenon in Belgium, France, the Netherlands, Greece, Italy, Portugal, and Spain, and initial reports have also come in from Switzerland and Germany, albeit to a lesser degree. Possible cases of CCD have also been reported in Taiwan since April 2007.

NASA, Kids and the Environment:

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2010-033&cid=release_2010-033&msource=a20100128&tr=y&auid=5868619

U.S. Forest Service Celebrating Wildflowers web page:

American Indian,Native American,youth,bee,bees,Marquette,Michigan,Upper Peninsula,Baraga,teens,teenagers,pollinators,pollen,pollinating,butterflies,butterfly,honeybees,bumblebees,environment,native plants,species extinction

Photobucket

Two Native American supporters of the Zaagkii Project, attending the July 2009 nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute Mid-Summer Festival at Presque Isle in Marquette, stand next to the beehive made by students with help from the director of the U.P. Childrens Museum. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Smoking Allowed:

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Being calmed by a smoker in the hands of beekeeper Dr. Jim Hayward, thousands of honeybees cling to the hive frame in June 2009 that is used by the bees to make honeycombs. (Photo by Erika Niebler)

Learning from a Master:

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Zaagkii Project students watch beekeeper Dr. Jim Hayward use a gripper to remove frames from the hives behind his home in Negaunee, MI during June 2009. (Photo by Erika Niebler)

Teen Beekeepers:

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Zaagkii Project volunteers Elliott Burdick (left), 17, a Marquette Senior High School (MSHS) senior and Taylor Dianich, 16, MSHS junior (right) stand next to honeybee hives in June 2009. (Photo by Erika Niebler)

2008 Zaagkii Projects Teens:

In July 2008 at the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute annual Mid-Summer Festival, Zaagkii Project teens told supporters what they were learning about pollinators and indigenous plants and wildflowers.

Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,2008,teens,teenagers,students,bees,butterflies,pollinators

During the first summer (2008) of the Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project, teens built, painted and handed out butterfly houses – that a slimmer and longer than bird houses with entries for butterflies with folded wings and a slab of bark for rest and reproduction. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Youth Protecting Pollinators:

Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,2008,teens,teenagers,students,bees,butterflies,pollinators

In July 2008 , Zaagkii Project teens and project founder Rev. Jon Magnuson tell supporters at the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute Mid-Summer Festival about what the students are doing during the first summer of the effort to protect pollinators. Magnuson is the executive director of the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute in Marquette, MI near Lake Superior. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Cooking on all Burners:

Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,2008,teens,teenagers,students,bees,butterflies,pollinators

Zaagkii Project teens help prepare the food at the annual Cedar Tree Institute Mid-Summer Festival during July 2008 in Marquette, MI.

During the first summer (2008) of the Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project, teens built, painted and handed out butterfly houses – that a slimmer and longer than bird houses with entries for butterflies with folded wings and a slab of bark for rest and reproduction.

Some of the students returned in 2009 to participate in the second summer of the Zaagkii Project during which mason bee houses were built, painted and distributed.

Both years the teens planted and distributed thousands of native species plants.

(Photo by Greg Peterson)

Like Shop Class:

Building Zaagkii Project houses 7/7/09

Building Zaagkii Project houses 7/7/09

Building Zaagkii Project houses 7/7/09

Zaagkii Project teens use a variety of tools to construct mason bee houses during the summer of 2009 in Marquette, MI with help from former shop teacher Bruce Ventura of Marquette

(Above photos by Greg Peterson)

Organic Farm Wildlife:

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Zaagkii Project teens check out a turkey at the Dancing Crane Farm in Skandia, MI where they helped with the native species plants. (Photo by Erika Niebler)

Organic Farms:

Learning importance of Native Species Plants to Pollinators …

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Zaagkii Project students work with native species plants in the summer of 2009 at the Dancing Crane Farm in Skandia, MI (above two photos) and at the Borealis Seed Company (below two photos) in Big bay, MI during the summer of 2009

(Photos by Erika Niebler)

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Native Species Plants:

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

The organic Gather’n Greens Farm in Negaunee Township, MI was another opportunity for students to grow native species plants during summer of 2009

(Photo by Erika Niebler)

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Zaagkii Project teen Jacob Feliciano of Skandia, a Gwinn Middle School seventh grader, holds a kitten at the Dancing Crane Farm in Skandia, MI. The farm has lots of exotic species of ildlife and the students learned respect for all of nature’s beings. (Photo by Erika Niebler)

Outstanding in Their Field:

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

(Photo by Erika Niebler)

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Zaagkii Projects students including 13-year-old Tanya Nelson of ishpeming, MI making friends with a Turkey (above) and a goat (below) at the Dancing Crane Farm in Skanida, MI.

(Photos by Erika Niebler)

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Tea Time:

Herbal Tea from Native plants in northern Michigan …

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

During summer of 2009, Zaagkii Project teens learned how to make a variety of herbal teas using indigenous plants/herbs in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula

(Photo by Erika Niebler)

Food, Food Food:

Energizing the Zaagkii Project teens …

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Zaagkii Project teens were always prepared a nutritional lunch while on many outings during the summer 2009. The teens learned that all the food they are would not be available if nbot for pollinators who make plants and veggies grow for salads and to provide feed for animals.

(Above photos courtesy Erika Niebler and Greg Peterson)

Youth, KBIC employees:

Learning how to respect the environment from Native American elders and youth …

Keweenaw Bay Indian Community,KBIC,tribal youth,youth,bees,butterflies,butterfly houses,bee,2008

Keweenaw Bay Indian Community,KBIC,tribal youth,youth,bees,butterflies,butterfly houses,bee,2008

Keweenaw Bay Indian Community,KBIC,tribal youth,youth,bees,butterflies,butterfly houses,bee,2008

Keweenaw Bay Indian Community,KBIC,tribal youth,youth,bees,butterflies,butterfly houses,bee,2008

Keweenaw Bay Indian Community,KBIC,tribal youth,youth,bees,butterflies,butterfly houses,bee,2008

Keweenaw Bay Indian Community,KBIC,tribal youth,youth,bees,butterflies,butterfly houses,bee,2008

(Photos by Greg Peterson)

The Zaagkii Project thanks KBIC official Todd Warner, Director of KBIC Natural Resource Department (NRD)

KBIC NRD employees help build butterfly houses in 2008

Those helping were tribal members Evelyn Ravindran, KBIC NRD Natural Resources Specialist; Katie Kruse, NRD Environment specialist; Char Beesley, Environment Specialist; Kit Laux, NRD Water Quality Specialist; and Kim Klopstein, one of the summer youth supervisors for the KBIC Summer Youth Program

For more info call 906-201-0020

KBIC Pow-wow:

Keweenaw Bay Indian Community,KBIC,tribal youth,youth,bees,butterflies,butterfly houses,bee,2008

Zaagkii Project students and the tribe’s summer youth were honored the 2008 Pow-wow at the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community in Baraga, MI. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Hearty Greens:

Big leafy greens not possible without pollinators …

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Behind some gigantic heads of greens, Zaagkii students learned that nothing grows without pollinators

(Photo by Erika Niebler)

A Great Lake:

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Zaagkii Project teens were taught an appreciation for all natural things and enjoyed this respite during 2009 in the chilly summer waters of Lake Superior in Marquette, MI – the world’s largest freshwater lake.

(Photo by Erika Niebler)

Hanging in Nature:

(Next five photos by Erika Niebler)

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

(Above five photos by Erika Niebler)

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The Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis Fitzhugh (Miller) Reynolds,Mrs. Maxwell K. Reynolds,Jr.,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette founding father Peter White,Peter White,Joan (Reynolds) Miller,Don Miller,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Manoomin Project,bees,butterflies,wild rice,philanthropy,philanthropist,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation Inc.,Wells Fargo Bank

Joan Miller (above and below) with other Zaagkii Project supporters at the 2008 and 2009 CTI MidSummer festival. (Photos by Greg Peterson)

The Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis Fitzhugh (Miller) Reynolds,Mrs. Maxwell K. Reynolds,Jr.,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette founding father Peter White,Peter White,Joan (Reynolds) Miller,Don Miller,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Manoomin Project,bees,butterflies,wild rice,philanthropy,philanthropist,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation Inc.,Wells Fargo Bank

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[blip.tv ?posts_id=3363569&dest=40935]

Marquette, Michigan) – The popular northern Michigan band Terracotta half-life performs an original song entitled “Call From Above” written by Emmanuel Kawedi in cooperation with other members of the band.

A Northern Michigan University (NMU) international graduate student from Tanzania, Emmanuel Kawedi sings vocals, plays congas, percussion.

He is introduced by Obadiah Metivier, a founding member of Terracotta half-life, website designer & technical guru who manages Cedar Tree Institute related websites.

A supporter of CTI environment projects, Terracotta half-life performs July 14, 2009 at the annual nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute/Zaagkii Project Midsummer Festival

Turning to the band, Terracotta half-life (pictured below) of Marquette, Pitawanakwat said “megwich for your inspirational songs.”

Live with Terracotta half-life

Terracotta half-life:

http://www.terracottahalflife.com

http://www.terracottahalflife.com/bio

http://www.terracottahalflife.com/bio/obadiah-metivier

Jerry Kippola, Guitar

Aaron Kippola, Alto Saxophone, Percussion

Obadiah Metivier, Bass Guitar, Vocals, Percussion

mediatechdesign@yahoo. com

Jennie Peano, Vocals, Percussion

Steve Leuthold, Baritone and Tenor Saxophone, Flute

Dan Schaefer, Drums

Emmanuel Kawedi, Congas, Percussion, Vocals

ekaweds@yahoo. com

Alumni – Keyboards, Guitars, Drums, Sax, Trumpet, Congas, Timbales, etc.

Upcoming Shows:

Tue 7/13/2010: Menominee Summer Concert Series

The Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project:

Working alongside members of several Ojibwa tribes, at-risk teens with the U.S. Forest Service-sponsored Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula will continue protecting pollinators during 2010 by helping to build the first-ever native species plants greenhouse on an American Indian reservation and hope to trace the Mexico Monarch migration.

During the summers 2008-2009, some 23 at-risk teens from Marquette, MI planted/distributed over 26,000 native plants seeds, helped transplant hundreds of native plant seedlings, and hiked through remote forests with Zaagkii Project Native American college interns to learn importance and uses for native species plants

The students built and painted 36 mason bee houses and 18 butterfly houses – with one of each placed by the USFS in The Peoples Garden at U.S. Department of Agriculture Headquarters, National Mall, Washington, DC.

The Zaagkii Project is sponsored by the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute, Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC), the United States Forest Service (USFS) and Marquette County Juvenile Court.

The at-risk teens put in 1,786 hours of community service working on the Zaagkii Project.

In 2010, the youths will help the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community and the USFS build a native plants greenhouse near the shores of Lake Superior, the first time such a greenhouse has been built on tribal property in the U.S.

KBIC “is happy to be partnering with the Cedar Tree Institute and the U.S. Forest Service,” said KBIC Tribal President Chris Swartz Jr. “We hope KBIC will be regarded as pioneers to bring these native plants back here.

Zaagkii youth will continue learning regional American Indian heritage, culture & language with Leora and Levi Tadgerson, Zaagkii interns from the NMU Department of Native American Studies

Zaagkii Project founder Rev. Jon Magnuson said a goal is bringing the youth to study the Mexico Monarch migration.

The Zaagkii Project thanks Larry Stritch, USFS national botanist in Washington, DC; and Jan Schultz, USFS Botany & Non-native Invasive Species Program Leader in Milwaukee.

Schultz has traveled to northern Michigan many times to meet with the teens.

The Zaagkii Project contributors include the Marquette Community Foundation, Marquette County Juvenile Court, the M.E. Davenport Foundation, the Kaufman Foundation and the Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation.


Cedar Tree Institute,Zaagkii Project,band,Terracotta half-life,Jerry Kippola,Guitar,Aaron Kippola,Alto Saxophone,Percussion,Obadiah  Metivier,Bass Guitar,Vocals,Jennie Peano,Steve Leuthold,Baritone Saxaphone,Tenor Saxophone,Flute,Dan Schaefer,Drums,Emmanuel Kawedi,Congas

Official band of the Cedar Tree Institute/Zaagkii Project annual Midsummer Festival:

Terracotta half-life

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

Terracotta half-life biography

Bio about the one and only Obadiah Metivier, a band member, overall techie genious and Zaagkii Project volunteer webmaster and technical guru

Jerry Kippola, Guitar

Aaron Kippola, Alto Saxophone, Percussion

Obadiah Metivier, Bass Guitar, Vocals, Percussion

Jennie Peano, Vocals, Percussion

Steve Leuthold, Baritone and Tenor Saxophone, Flute

Dan Schaefer, Drums

Emmanuel Kawedi, Congas, Percussion, Vocals

Alumni – Keyboards, Guitars, Drums, Sax, Trumpet, Congas, Timbales, etc.


Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

Upcoming Shows:

6/18/2010: Harley’s Lounge
7/13/2010: Menominee Summer Concert Series
7/14/2010: Cedar Tree Institute Mid Summer Celebration
8/12/2010: Ishpeming Summer Concert Series

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

[blip.tv ?posts_id=3251110&dest=40935]

USFS Success Story hails 2008-2010 Zaagkii Project
Posted by USFS on 2-02-2010

USFS Success Story on 2008 Zaagkii Project
Posted by USFS on 8-08-2008

Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,2008,teens,teenagers,students,bees,butterflies,pollinators

(Marquette, MI) – Working alongside members of several Ojibwa tribes, at-risk teens with the U.S. Forest Service-sponsored Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula will continue protecting pollinators during 2010 by helping to build the first-ever native species plants greenhouse on an American Indian reservation and hope to trace the migration of Monarchs into Mexico.

During the past two summers (2008-2009), 23 at-risk teens from Marquette, MI planted or distributed over 26,000 native plants seeds, helped transplant hundreds of native plant seedlings, hiked through remote forests with Zaagkii Project Native American college interns to learn importance and uses for native species plants, and have built and painted 36 mason bee houses and 18 butterfly houses with one of each placed by the USFS in the The Peoples Garden at U.S. Department of Agriculture Headquarters on the National Mall in Washington, DC.

The Zaagkii Project is sponsored by the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute, Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC), the United States Forest Service (USFS) and Marquette County Juvenile Court.

The at-risk teens put in 1,786 hours of community service working on the Zaagkii Project.

In 2010, the youths will help the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community and the USFS build a native plants greenhouse near the shores of Lake Superior – the first time such a greenhouse has been built on tribal property in the U.S.

KBIC “is happy to be partnering with the Cedar Tree Institute and the U.S. Forest Service in trying to protect native plants and bring them back home,” said KBIC Tribal President Chris Swartz Jr.

“One day we hope (KBIC) will be regarded as pioneers to bring these native plants back here,” he said. “So it’s only fitting that the (KBIC) become involved in helping save those native plants.”

This year, the Zaagkii youth volunteers will continue other activities including learning about regional American Indian heritage, culture and language with Leora and Levi Tadgerson, who are Zaagkii Project interns from the NMU Department of Native American Studies (NMU CNAS). The brother/sister team are members of the Bay Mills Indian Community.

This year, the Tadgersons are creating an ethnobotany project on the USFS website integrating traditional Anishinaabe (aka Ojibwa, Chippewa) language in identifying native plants and their cultural uses.

Leora Tadgerson will discuss the Zaagkii Project while making a presentation on Engaging Students through Community Action and Service on May 20-22, 2010 at the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association (NAISA) 2010 National Conference in Tuscon, AZ.

In 2009, the Zaagkii Project teens visited with three beekeepers in Marquette County, MI, helped plant and harvest native plants at three organic farms along the Lake Superior basin, studied pollinators at the Peter White Public Library and learned about annual Monarch migrations and its dependence on milkweed from The Butterfly Lady Susan Payant.

In 2008, KBIC youth helped build butterfly houses and in 2009 helped restore native species plants to 2.5 miles along Sand Point on Lake Superior, a tribal beach that was the first Native American Brownfield site in the Midwest after being contaminated 90 years ago by a copper refinery.

Zaagkii Project founder Rev. Jon Magnuson said a goal of the third and final summer of the three-year initiative is to bring at-risk youth to Mexico to study the migration that includes hundreds of thousands of Monarchs passing through northern Michigan.

Working with Marquette County Juvenile Court, plans are underway to organize and fund a delegation of at-risk teens to visit Mexico and welcome arrival of the monarch migration in November 2010 to coincide with the Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) holiday, said Magnuson, executive director of the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute in Marquette.

Magnuson said Zaagkii Project efforts to protect pollinators would not be possible without the support of Larry Stritch, USFS national botanist in Washington, DC; and Jan Schultz, USFS Botany & Non-native Invasive Species Program Leader in Milwaukee.

Schultz has traveled to northern Michigan many times to meet with the teens who update her on the project.

“The insect pollinators in North America evolved with indigenous plants and so they are really well-suited to pollinate them,” Schultz said after watching the teens make the mason bee houses in Marquette.

Schultz said that “native plants and the native insects that pollinate them represent a symbiotic relationship” and cannot survive without each other.

With 150,000 bees buzzing around their heads in June 2009, the Zaagkii Project teens again got up close and personal with honeybees and learned the role of drones, worker bees and about royal jelly produced by the queen thanks to beekeeper Dr. Jim Hayward in Negaunee, MI.

The teens inspected several frames each covered with about 3,000 bees and oozed dripping honey.

Bees and butterflies “are a part of the web of life because they pollinate all the flowers and fruit trees that provide us with food,” said Hayward, a Marquette dentist.

Helping the students with ideas on painting their mason bee houses were illustrator/aritist Diana Magnuson of Marquette and Marquette native Sherri Bohjanen-Hutter of Anchorage, Alaska.

During the annual Cedar Tree Institute Mid-Summer Festival in July 2009, the Zaagkii Project at-risk teens wowed the audience by talking about the many things they’ve learned about pollinators and native species plants.

The Zaagkii Project has been featured in local and regional news articles, several Native American and non-native national newspaper stories, has a large internet presence and has begun posting the first of more than a dozen high definition videos in youtube, bliptv and other popular online sites.

The Zaagkii Project contributors include the Marquette Community Foundation, Marquette County Juvenile Court, the M.E. Davenport Foundation, the Kaufman Foundation and the Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation.

——-

American Indian,Native American,youth,bee,bees,Marquette,Michigan,Upper Peninsula,Baraga,teens,teenagers,pollinators,pollen,pollinating,butterflies,butterfly,honeybees,bumblebees,environment,native plants,species extinction

2010 Pollinator Week:

The Fourth Annual National Pollinator Week is June 21-27, 2010

American Indian,Native American,youth,bee,bees,Marquette,Michigan,Upper Peninsula,Baraga,teens,teenagers,pollinators,pollen,pollinating,butterflies,butterfly,honeybees,bumblebees,environment,native plants,species extinction

Photos by Erika Niebler and Greg Peterson

(Negaunee, Michigan) – Surrounded by a swarm of 150,000 loudly buzzing bees on a hot summer day, a group of Marquette County teens turned nervous faces and trepidation into smiles and a education that they heard loud and clear – to protect rather than fear pollinators.

At first only two teens wearing protective beekeeping gear entered the apiary behind the Negaunee township home of Jim and Martha Hayward. The others wearing only shorts and t-shirts soon approached when they discovered that honeybees are not aggressive.

Suited for Pollinators:

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Beekeeper Jim Hayward, a Marquette dentist, fits a protective suit on Zaagkii Project volunteer Elliott Burdick, 17, a Marquette Senior High School (MSHS) senior and Taylor Dianich, 16, MSHS junior (left behind Hayward), as the Zaagkii group of teens prepare to check out the honeybee hives on June 25, 2009 in the back yard of Hayward’s home in Negaunee Township, MI. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Bees and butterflies “are a part of the web of life because they pollinate all the flowers and fruit trees that provide us with food,” said Dr. Jim Hayward, a Marquette dentist who has four honeybee hives on a shaded hillside.

Plethora of Pollinators:

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Beekeeper Jim Hayward (right) of Negaunee Township, MI explains how to operate a smoker to Taylor Dianich, 16, a Marquette Senior High School (MSHS) junior (center) and Elliott Burdick (left), 17, MSHS senior on June 25, 2009. Hayward explained the smoker calms bees because they protect their honey by gorging themselves with it fearing there is a fire and they may need to flee with the valuable sticky gold to make a new nest. Zaagkii Project teens visited Hayward’s hives in 2008 and 2009. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

The teens literally got up close and personal with the honeybees by inspecting honeycomb trays each covered with about 3,000 busy bees and even handled a drone that Hayward explained do not have stingers like the rest of the colony and are easily identified by a larger round abdomen and bigger eyes.

“It doesn’t have a stinger? Are you positive?,” asked apprehensive teen Keith Gelsinger of Marquette.

The Queen’s Servant:

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Zaagkii Project teen volunteer Anatoly Nelson holds a honeybee drone, that doesn’t have a stinger and can’t even feed itself but has the vital duty of mating with the queen. The teens were amazed that drones can not sting. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

“I am positive,” Hayward said confidently while carefully handing the struggling drone to Gelsinger. “You can grab on to it – it won’t sting you.”

Honey Farming Dentist:

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Beekeeper and Marquette Dentist Dr. Jim Hayward has been hosting Zaagkii teens since the project began – giving the students a hands-on, up-close and personal experience with his 150,000 honeybees near Negaunee, MI.

Hayward and his wife Martha love the taste of honey and he says his beekeeping hobby has nothing to do with trying to keep youth from eating sugar and avoid dental problems – it’s a pleasant coincidence. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

In his soft-spoken, calm demeanor that relaxed the teens and the bees, Hayward said “you can stand a lot closer if you want, you won’t get stung.”

“The sole purpose of the drone is to mate with the queen. Otherwise it has no function. It can’t even feed itself. The other worker bees have to feed the drones.”

The teens let out an audible but soft gasp when Hayward pulled out a tray that was dripping with honey and packed with bees.

“Oooohh,” several of the astonished youths said at once.

Pointing to the edge of the honey-oozing tray in the bright sun, Hayward said “you can see the glistening of honey there.”

“It’s awesome,’ said 13-year-old eighth grader Tanya Nelson of Ishpeming. “Look at it, it’s honey, it’s dripping.”

Sweet Honey:

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Zaagkii Project volunteer 17-year-old Elliott Burdick of Marquette, MI inspects a honeycomb oozing with honey and covered with thousands of honeybees that is being held by veteran beekeeper Dr. Jim Hayward. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

The teens also visited a bee farm along the Dead River operated by Dr. Lisa Long and Lee Ossenheimer in Negaunee Township and heard from beekeeper Jon Kniskern of Marquette.

Beekeeper Jon Kniskern:

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Zaagkii Project teens learned about honeybees from three northern Michigan beekeepers including Jon Kniskern of Marquette who brought hive frames and other tools of the trade like a smoker to his session with the students next to the peaceful Marquette Lower Harbor on Lake Superior in the summer of 2009.

The teens also visited the beekeeping operations of beekepers Jim Hayward and Lee Ossenheimer of Gather’n Greens. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

The Zaagkii Project is sponsored by the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute (CTI), Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC) and the United States Forest Service (USFS).

We are Family:

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

Dozens of northern Michigan teens have participated in the Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project (Photos by Greg Peterson)

2008 Zaagkii Projects Teens:

In July 2008 at the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute annual Mid-Summer Festival, Zaagkii Project teens told supporters what they were learning about pollinators and indigenous plants and wildflowers.

Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,2008,teens,teenagers,students,bees,butterflies,pollinators

Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,2008,teens,teenagers,students,bees,butterflies,pollinators

During the first summer (2008) of the Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project, teens built, painted and handed out butterfly houses – that a slimmer and longer than bird houses with entries for butterflies with folded wings and a slab of bark for rest and reproduction.
Some of the students returned in 2009 to participate in the second summer of the Zaagkii Project during which mason bee houses were built, painted and distributed.
Both years the teens planted and distributed thousands of native species plants.
(Photos by Greg Peterson)

Teen Anatoly Nelson was impressed that he was able to stand in the huge swarm and not get stung.

“Holy cow, that’s a lot of bees,” said Nelson, who also handled a honeybee drone that doesn’t have a stinger.

Getting a Grip:

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Beekeeper Jim Hayward of Negaunee, MI uses a gripper to show one of the honeycomb trays to Zaagkii teens during a June 25, 2009 visit by Zaagkii Project members. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Student Anatoly Nelson also stood in a thick warm of bees and watched with amazement as they buzzed around his body and even bumped him without stinging or becoming alarmed.

Unbee-lievable Buzz:

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Anatoly Nelson (left) calmly freezes, and can’t help smiling, as a swarm of honeybees bounced off his body but were not upset by his presence at the Hayward apiary. Watching are 16-year old Jake Gentz (center), a Marquette Senior High School senior; and Jim Rule (right), a child care counselor at Marquette County Youth Home. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Honeybees often have “sacks of yellow or orange pollen on its legs,” Hayward said. “They are busy bringing their nectar and pollen back to the hive.”

“You can learn a lot about the health of the hive by just looking at the flow of the bees coming in and out of the hive,” Hayward said as the heavy bees bounced in for landings.

Golden Combs:

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Beekeeper Jim Hayward (left) holds a tray with thousands of honey bees as Zaagkii Project eighth grader Tanya Nelson (second from left), 13, of Ishpeming, MI watches in amazement along with Cedar Tree Institute volunteer Amanda Emerson (second from right) of Cary, Ill., the 21-year-old event coordinator for the Northern Michigan University (NMU) Student Team and an NMU Senior Majoring in International Studies (emphasis on Latin America) and Earth Science (emphasis on rocks and minerals). Making a point is Zaagkii Project volunteer Tom Reed (right) of Marquette, who has a bachelors degree in social work and has worked on several Cedar Tree Institute environment projects. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

In its second summer, the three-year Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project protects pollinators through habitat creation that includes teenagers constructing dozens of bee and butterfly houses while helping native plants flourish by distributing and planting tens of thousands indigenous seeds.

Billions of bees of have died worldwide in an ongoing syndrome dubbed Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD). Suspected causes for CCD include pollution, pesticides, climate change and habitat destruction.

Bees have always been killed by a wide-range of predators.

Natural bee killers include black bears that raid hives for honey, bald-faced hornets who kill the queen and feast on the colony, birds that pick them off in mid-air and skunks who scratch on the hive with an insatiable taste for guard bees.

Zaagkii Project Teens:

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Zaagkii Project teens at the Dancing Crane Farm in Skandia, MI in the summer of 2009 (Photo by Erika Niebler)

Feral and commercial hives are attacked by viruses, bacteria and parasites like a tracheal mite that infests honeybee airways and blood-sucking mites that infect and feed on adult and larval bees causing wings deformities.

Pollinator Pleasure:

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Beekeeper Jim Hayward explains the difference in the appearance of members of the honeybee family like worker bees and drones as Zaagkii Project volunteer Keith Gelsinger of Marquette, MI smiles. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Hayward uses electric fences to protect bees from persistent bears and elevates hives on cinder blocks to discourage skunks.

“That makes the skunks have to stand up, so their bellies are exposed and the bees can sting them more easily,” Hayward said.

Experts say bee colonies have declined 70 to 90 percent in the past quarter century. Albert Einstein predicted humans would die within four years if bees disappeared.

“People get into beekeeping is to sell their pollination services to orchards around the country” including “apple and cherry orchards in Michigan,” Hayward said.

Youthful Green Thumbs:

Joining Forces: The force of Mother Nature’s Native Species Plants and the powerful hungry for knowledge Zaagkii Project teens are unstoppable….

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Zaagkii Project students work in one of the vast fields with native species plants in the summer of 2009 at the Dancing Crane Farm in Skandia, MI (Photo by Erika Niebler)

“I got into raising bees after local bee populations died out because of some disease and we did not have anything to pollinate” our fruits and vegetables, Hayward said.

Bodacious Honeybees:

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About 3,000 honeybees cling to every tray that all ooze with honey at the apiary run by beekeeper Dr. Jim Hayward in Negaunee, MI. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

The teens learned about beekeeper tools like honeycomb trays, frame grippers, a hive tool and a bee brush.

“You can brush them off an area with this gentle brush and it won’t damage the bees,” Hayward said.

Happy and Unafraid:

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(Photo by Greg Peterson)

While reassuring the teens that “honeybees tend to be docile,” Hayward donned himself and two youths in protective gear including a bee veil and gloves.

“If I make a false step and jar the hive or move to quickly it keeps me from being stung,” he said. “Honeybees die if they sting you, so they are not anxious to sting unless they are protecting themselves or the hive.”

Nature’s Best Friends:

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Zaagkii Project teens gather along the edges of the apiary in Negaunee, MI that has numerous honeybee hives while listening to Dr. Jim Hayward’s honeybee facts. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

“The queen excluder keeps the queen from getting up into the honey chambers and laying eggs so you don’t get larval bees into the honey,” he said. “These two chambers are the brood chambers, where the hive raises its new bees.”

During the summer, the queen “lays close to a thousand eggs a day,” Hayward said. “It takes 21 days for a bee to develop.”

Smoking Sumac:

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Zaagkii Project tens learned several uses for bitter dried sumac, a plant indigenous to northern Michigan, including making a lemonade-flavored tea and for use in a bee smoker. Beekeeper Jim Hayward (left) demonstrates how to light the dried sumac to Zaagkii Project volunteer Elliott Burdick (center), 17, a Marquette Senior High School (MSHS) senior and Taylor Dianich, 16, MSHS junior (right). (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Using a smoker that burns dried sumac, Hayward said the smoke “simulates a forest fire” triggering a protective instinct that causes the bees “to gorge themselves with honey in preparation for leaving the hive.”

2009 Zaagkii Project Teens:

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Zaagkii Project teens learned respect for nature and themselves during the summer of 2009. (Photo by Erika Niebler)

Hayward explained that the bitter sumac burning in his bee smoker makes a great tea that tastes like lemon.

Later the teens made sumac iced tea, add a drop of Hayward’s honey and served it to Zaagkii Project supporters at the annual CTI Midsummer Festival at Presque Isle in Marquette. The youths made other natural hors d’oeuvres like honey and wild mint in a tiny appetizer cup.

Lake Superior Safe Harbor:

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Sitting on the Dock of the Bay with Zaagkii Students:

Marquette teens listen to Zaagkii Project founder Rev. Jon Magnuson while sitting on the edge of a bike path that parallels the Marquette Upper Harbor next the the old iron ore docks once used by giant ships to haul ore to steels mills on the lower Great Lakes – ships like the Edmund Fitzgerald (Photos by Erika Niebler)

The smoker causes the bees to quickly consume honey for possible transport to a new hive and the honey relaxes the bees so they won’t sting while being handled.

“When they are gorged with honey they are more docile,” he said. “The key is moving slowly and trying to be a gentle as you can be – so the bees don’t get too excited.”

Zaagkii Coverup:

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Nettin’ to be Afraid of:

Dr. Jim Hayward adjusts a protective bee net and hat worn by Zaagkii Project volunteers (Photo by Greg Peterson)

“Drones develop from unfertilized eggs, worker bees are developed from fertilized eggs,” Hayward said.

“If they need to make a queen they take worker larva and feed it a special extract from their heads called Royal Jelly and that larva grows into a queen instead of a worker.”

Check it out:

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Zaagkii Project teens visit Gather’n Greens on June 24, 2009, a bee farm along the Dead River operated by Dr. Lisa Long and Lee Ossenheimer in Negaunee Township, MI.

Their seven-year-old son, Jesse Ossenheimer, is pictured showing Zaagkii project students some of the frames used by bees to produce honey. The couple also grow mushrooms.

Zaagkii Project teens went swimming in Dead River Basin after tasting honey and visiting with beekeeper Lee Ossenheimer. It’s a family affair as the couple’s children taught the students about the art of beekeeping. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Exact Extracting:

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Beekeeper Lee Ossenheimer of Negaune Township, MI and his seven-year-old son, Jesse Ossenheimer show Zaagkii Project teens the honey extractor that spins and uses centrifugal force to remove the honey from the frames on honeycombs. Ossenheimer and his wife Dr. Lisa Long, own an organic farm that includes a beekeeping, mushroom and vegetable seedling business named Gather’n Greens in Negaunee Township, MI. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Future Beekeeper:

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Seven-year-old Jesse Ossenheimer shows a honeycomb frame to Zaagkii Project volunteer Taylor Dianich, 16, a MSHS Junior. Jesse has learned a lot about his parents beekeeping operations at their business Gather’n Greens in Negaunee, Township, MI. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

The teens likely have “never been that close to a bee hive before,” said Jim Rule, a child care counselor at Marquette County Youth Home.

“Even the kids that did not have any protective gear were right up close too,” Rule said. “I was amazed at how brave they were.”

Yummy Tummy Honey:

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Above, Zaagkii Projects teens Anatoly Nelson (second from right) and Brandon Maki (right) enjoy fresh honey provided by beekeeper Dr. Lisa Long (left) in Negaunee Township, MI. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Sticky Licking:

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Zaagkii Project eighth grader Tanya Nelson (left), 13, of Ishpeming, MI uses a fork to enjoy the fresh honey provided by Dr. Lisa Long. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Honey Heaven:

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Hayward Honey:

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

Beekeeper Dr. Jim Hayward speaks in July 2009 to Zaagkii Project supporters at the annual Mid-Summer Festival hosted by the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute in the pavilion on Marquette’s Presque Isle that’s surrounded on three sides by Lake Superior. (Photos by Greg Peterson)

Gather’n Greens:

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Holding his three-year-old son Alex Ossenheimer, beekeeper Lee Ossenheimer of Negaune Township, MI talks with Zaagkii Project teens on June 24, 2009 before taking them on a tour of his apiary and mushroom growing operations named Gather’n Greens. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Sunny Honeycomb:

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Zaagkii Project teen Devon Myers checks out the sunlit honeycomb frames used by beekeepers and their bees to create honey. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Pass the Comb:

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Zaagkii Project eighth grader Tanya Nelson (left), 13, of Ishpeming, MI holds a frame used by beekeepers to have bees create honeycombs. Below, teen Brandon Maki sniffs the wax smell of the honeycomb tray after the honey is removed. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

PhotobucketThe teens sniffed honeycomb trays and checked them out using the sun. Honeycombs trays have a unique, waxy smell that the teens will always remember (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Mother of Monarchs:

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

“The Butterfly Lady” Susan Payant of Marquette reads a short story about Monarchs entitled: “Waiting for Wings” by author/poet Lois Ehlert in July 2009 at the annual nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute Mi-Summer Festival in Marquette. (Photos by Greg Peterson)

For a second year, Susan Payant of Marquette, nicknamed “The Butterfly Lady,” taught Zaagkii Project teens about the importance of Monarch butterflies and native plants.

At the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute 2009 Mid-Summer Festival at Presque Isle Pavilion in Marquette during July, Payant reads a childrens short story/poem entitled: “Waiting for Wings” by Lois Ehlert, author, poet, designer, illustrator.

The Butterfly Lady:

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For the second year, Susan Payant of Marquette taught Zaagkii Project teens about Monarchs and other butterflies and why they are second only to bees when it comes to pollination.

The popular, pleasant and passionate Payant is well-known around northern Michigan and is lovingly called “The Butterfly Lady” because of her love for butterflies and their life-cycle. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

Hundreds of thousands of Monarchs pass through the U.P. each year enroute to a famous gathering spot in Mexico where millions of Monarchs converge from across the world.

The teens visited Laughing White Fish Falls in Alger County, the organic Dancing Crane Farm run by Natasha and David Gill in Skandia, and planted native species plants at the Borealis Seed Company owned by Sue Rabitaille in Big Bay.

Meeting three days a week for five weeks, the teens walked dozens of miles during numerous hikes, climbed Sugar Loaf, and swam in Lake Superior and the Dead River.

Cedar Tree Fans:

American Indian,Native American,youth,bee,bees,Marquette,Michigan,Upper Peninsula,Baraga,teens,teenagers,pollinators,pollen,pollinating,butterflies,butterfly,honeybees,bumblebees,environment,native plants,species extinction

Zaagkii Project supporters enjoy themselves at the July 2009 Mid-Summer Festival in the pavilion at Presque Isle in Marquette. (Photos by Greg Peterson)

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The teens built a huge beehive with help from Jim Edwards at the U.P. Children’s Museum, who created a large butterfly for the Zaagkii Project in 2008.

Using hoops, spray paint, and other tricks, Edwards showed the teens that many things can be built out of everyday products including the beehive, bees and the butterfly. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Rockin’ Rick:

Soothing Thai Chi from expert Rick Pietila is sought by famous bands for his techie expertise:

Rick Pietila does Tai Chi July 2009

Relaxation techniques like Tai Chi are now part of the Zaagkii teens repertoire thanks to martial artist Rick Pietila of Marquette, MI who gave several demonstrations including Tai Chi fundamentals. (Above Photo by Greg Peterson)

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The students learned Tai Chi along the calming Lower Harbor in Marquette, MI with a fresh Lake Superior breeze an important part of the June 23, 2009 experience.

Rick Pietila’s other ongoing amazing adventures include traveling with several legendary Rock and Roll groups including being a guitar tech for the band Boston and traveled into South America with the band Stryper and has been a road techie for many other iconic bands. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

Native Senses:

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The students learned about different species of native plants and insects during several outings with an Ojibwa brother and sister – Levi and Leora Tadgerson – who are Zaagkii Project interns from the NMU Department of Native American Studies. (Above and below photos by Greg Peterson)

The students learned “different uses the Ojibwa had for edible and medicinal plants” like “the saps of different trees and the roots,” said Levi Tadgerson, 22, of Marquette, an NMU senior.

“We explained this plant is good for keeping bugs away from you and this plant is good for a breath mint,” Tadgerson said.

Native American Heritage

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The Tadgersons were impressed with the teens’ ability to grasp Chippewa language because “we would tell them the different native names for plants and two days later they would remember it,” said Leora Tadgerson of Negaunee.

“I think the earth is suffering,” she said. “Indicator plants like wild rice that don’t grow as much anymore because of the way we have abused the earth.”

Heritage and Culture:

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Zaagkii Project instructors Levi Tadgerson and Leora Tadgerson of Negaunee, MI are interns from the Northern Michigan University center for Native American Studies in Marquette. Leora is pictured teaching the teens how to recognized various plants indigenous to the central Upper Peninsula of Michigan near Lake Superior. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

The pair taught the teens to seek a “symbiotic relationship” with the earth because “nowadays we are more of a parasite to the planet,” Levi Tadgerson said. “We need to respect the gift we have been given by Mother Earth.”

The Anishinaabemowin Way

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Northern Michigan University Center for Native American Studies Anishinaabemowin Professor Kenneth Pitawanakwat explained why and how Native Americans show respect for the earth and then led the closing prayer at the CTI Mid-Summer Festival in July 2009. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

“There are ways to heal by just getting into the woods and learning knowledge from elders,” he said. “There are gifts and teachings every day that you will get from the earth.”

Both passed on respect for the earth inherited from elders and knowledge about native plants learned from NMU Anishinaabemowin Professor Kenneth Pitawanakwat, who offered the closing prayer at the CTI midsummer festival.

“We greet each day and end each day with a thank you prayer,” Pitawanakwat said.

“In Native America, all events begin and end with prayer. It’s a spiritual component that’s all done with prayer. There is no such thing as a separation of church and state.”

Martial arts training and Tai Chi lessons, techniques for relaxation, were given to the teens by Rick Pietila of Marquette. They performed their new talents art at the CTI Mid-Summer Festival in Marquette.

Noting a Tai Chi performance by the Zaagkii Project teens, Pitawanakwat said:

“The sounds from the soft fluttering moves of Tai Chi were very beneficial to all of us.”

Nature Moves:

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

Zaagkii Project instructor Rick Pietila of Marquette taught the teens many relaxation techniques including Tai Chi that the group performed at the Cedar Tree Institute 2009 Mid-Summer Festival. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Turning to the band, Terracotta half-life (pictured below) of Marquette, Pitawanakwat said “megwich for your inspirational songs.”

Live with Terracotta half-life

Scroll down to credits to learn more about Terracotta half-life.

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

A few weeks earlier, the sounds of hammers and saws filled the Grace United Methodist Church in Marquette for several days as the teens built and painted 36 mason bee houses with help from carpenter/retired teacher Bruce Ventura and artist Diana Magnuson, both of Marquette.

In 2008, other Zaagkii Project teens built and painted 17 butterfly houses at the church.

Carpentry skills:

Building Zaagkii Project houses 7/7/09

Former school teacher Bruce Ventura (pictured in above collage) of Marquette taught the Zaagkii Project students to build mason bee houses during the summer of 2009 at the Grace United Methodist Church in Marquette.

(Photos by Greg Peterson)

Mason Bee Houses:

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Shaped like a birdhouse, the mason bee houses have five pieces of wood below the roof with 33 holes that are each turned into a private nursery. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Creative Teens:

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Zaagkii Project students paint the mason bee houses on July 8, 2009 that they built a few days earlier at the Grace United Methodist Church in Marquette, MI. (Photos by Greg Peterson)

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Mason bees “are very particular” and “want a five-sixteenths inch diameter hole,” Ventura said. “If the holes are too large other insects get into them, and if the holes are too small the mason bees can’t get in.”

After laying a single egg into each hole, the mason bees “deposit some pollen and mud that hole closed hence the name mason bee,” Ventura said.

Mason Bee Motivation

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Zaagkii Project students paint the mason bee houses on July 8, 2009 that they built a few days earlier at the Grace United Methodist Church in Marquette, MI. (Photos by Greg Peterson)

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Mason bees “make these holes three to six inches deep depending on the size of the tree,” he said. “Mason bees are solitary bees, they’re not colonial like honey bees.”

While mason bees do not make honey, Ventura said “they’re great pollinators like honeybees.”

Ventura is impressed with the teen’s carpentry and artistic skills.

“The young people are terrific,” he said. “They did a great job putting the mason bee houses together and decorating. They did a lot of sawing and nailing and screwed in the tops.”

Lessons on protecting pollinators was not lost on the Zaagkii Project teens.

“I learned that there are 4,000 different species of bees,” Bobbie Weymouth, 14, of Beaver Grove told project supporters at the CTI Midsummer Festival.

Earlier, Weymouth explained what he’d learned about mason bees as he nailed and sanded mason bee houses.

“The bees are going to put pollen it these holes and put mud in and then they hatch an egg,” said Weymouth, whose brother Daniel participated in the Manoomin Project, a CTI environment initiative that paired Marquette teens with Native American elders to restore wild rice to seven remote rivers and lakes across the U.P.

While screwing on a mason bee house roof and sanding the edges, Elliott Burdick, 17, of Marquette said “pollinators are important to all life on earth because they pollinate all the fruits and vegetables we eat.”

“I am screwing in the roof to the base of the bees houses right now,” Burdick said. “Then I am sanding it down so the edges are not sharp and making it all flush. The mason bees will be going inside these holes.”

Looking Sharp:

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Artistic Appreciation:

Zaagkii Project,teens,illustrator Diana Magnuson,Diana Magnuson,Sherri Bohjanen-Hutter,Anchorage,Alaska,painting,mason bee houses,Grace United Methodist Church,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project

Zaagkii Project teens gave presents to children’s book illustrator Diana Magnuson (center) of Marquette and artist Sherri Bohjanen-Hutter (right), a Marquette native from Anchorage, Alaska. The artists helped the Zaagkii teens learned about different kids of paint and techniques as they used colorful designs on their mason bee houses. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Zaagkii Project founder Rev. Jon Magnuson talks to Cedar Tree Institute supporters in July 2009 as the Zaagkii students cook on the pavilion grill on Presque Isle in Marquette, MI at the annual CTI Mid-Summer Festival. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

A Good Sign:

Building Zaagkii Project houses 7/7/09

Zaagkii Project teens hold signs about the pollinator initiative during a summer 2009 group discussion on protecting pollinators.
(Photo by Greg Peterson)

The students learned that butterflies are just as important pollinators as bees.

“I learned that Monarch butterflies only eat and lay their eggs on milkweed,” said Jake Gentz, 16, who will be a senior this fall at Marquette Senior High Schools

Student Brandon Maki of Marquette said he “learned we can make natural teas out of spruce trees and pine trees.”

The mason bee houses are now in yards across Marquette County. The mason bee houses and last summer’s butterfly houses were put up around the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community and one of each were placed by the USFS in the “The People’s Garden” at U.S. Department of Agriculture Headquarters on the National Mall in Washington D.C.

Teen Devon Myers of Marquette told Zaagkii Project supporters at the CTI Midsummer Festival that the students “made 36 mason bee houses and we are giving some of them away tonight.”

USFS officials said the Zaagkii Project is effectively spreading the word about the importance of native plants and the teen mason bee and butterfly houses have a positive impact on the survival of pollinators.

The U.S. Forest Service (USFS):

The USFS is part of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

U.S. Forest Service official Jan Schultz gives an update on the Zaagkii Project and the forest service extensive efforts to protect pollinators and promote native species plants in July 2008 at the annual Cedar Tree Institute Summer Festival in Marquette, MI. Schultz is the USFS botany and non-native species program leader in Milwaukee, WI. (Photos by Greg Peterson)

“In point of fact, the mason bee houses are very useful,” said Jan Schultz, USFS botany and non-native species program leader in Milwaukee, WI. “The mason bee houses are used by mason bees and other types of solitary bees. They really like them and they will have customers.”

“The insect pollinators in North America evolved with indigenous plants and so they are really well-suited to pollinate them,” Schultz said after watching the teens make the houses in Marquette.

Schultz said that “native plants and the native insects that pollinate them represent a symbiotic relationship” and cannot survive without each other.

Native Species Plants:

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Zaagkii Project teams spent hours and hours in the deep northwoods learning about native species plants including learning about the different benefits of the plants such as medicinal from Native American teachings thanks to NMU Center for Native American Studies Zaagkii project interns Leora and Levi Tadgerson. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

“In some instances they have a mutualistic relationship, where they are pollinated by one insect and one plant species, so it can be really specific,” she said.

Vegetable and flower garden production increases when “native plants are in close proximity,” she said, “because the pollinators that people want to pollinate their squash or tomatoes need to have food all summer long.”

Life-Giving Water:

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The importance of northern Michigan’s vast water resources to the health and vitality of indigenous plants, pollinators and humans was absorbed by Zaagkii Project teens who also took the time to swim and relax in frigid but pristine Lake Superior and several rivers/streams in Marquette and Alger counties in the summers of 2008 and 2009 (Photos by Erika Niebler)

Pollinators “are not going to magically appear in front of a tomato flower at an appropriate time,” Schultz said. “So planting with native plants in proximity to their garden makes for a much more productive garden and more produce.”

“Milkweeds and monarchs are a stunning example ,” she said. “The monarch larva prefer to eat various milkweed species.”

“The more of the milkweed that monarchs eat, the less palatable they are to predators because apparently they taste really horrible,” Schultz said. “So that’s beneficial to the monarch butterfly and they also pollinate the milkweed flower.”

Protecting Pollinators:

Working Together: Native Americans, non-natives, young and old, teens and college students …

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

During the CTI Midsummer festival, KBIC Tribal President Chris Swartz Jr. (bottom left photo in collage) announced the building of a native plants greenhouse that scheduled to be built in 2010 on tribal property near Baraga. (Photos by Greg Peterson)

Native Understanding:

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

In 2010, the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community will build the first native species plants greenhouse on a Native American reservation that will be similar to the Hiawatha National Forest Greenhouse (Upper left photo in collage) in Marquette, MI.

Zaagkii students (upper right photo) plants seeds in the summer of 2008 and have have planted/distributed tens of thousands of native species plants and seeds.

The plants were later planted along the KBIC Sand Point beach in Baraga County that was once polluted by copper mining operations. Two photos on bottom right show the Sand Point beach after the copper tailings were covered and before the native plants were planted.

Cedar Tree Institute/Zaagkii project organizers meet with officials with the KBIC Natural Resource Department (bottom middle photo) in the summer of 2008 to plan the Sand Point native plants project. (Photos by Greg Peterson)

KBIC “is happy to be partnering with the Cedar Tree Institute and the U.S. Forest Service in trying to protect native plants and bring them back home,” Swartz said.

“One day we hope (KBIC) will be regarded as pioneers to bring these native plants back here,” he said. “So it’s only fitting that the (KBIC) become involved in helping save those native plants.”

A History of Cooperation:

The Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC), the United States Forest Service (USFS) and the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute in Marquette, MI

American Indian,Native American,youth,bee,bees,Marquette,Michigan,Upper Peninsula,Baraga,teens,teenagers,pollinators,pollen,pollinating,butterflies,butterfly,honeybees,bumblebees,environment,native plants,species extinction

Hiawatha National Forest Greenhouse:

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Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Using spades, wheelbarrows and gardener’s gloves, Zaagkii Project teens planted/distributed tens of thousands of native species plant seeds and harvested seedlings at the Hiawatha National Forest Greenhouse in Marquette, MI. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

“We have been working with the Cedar Tree Institute for a number of years and they are great to work with,” said Swartz, noting the Manoomin Project to restore wild rice and native plants restoration project at the KBIC Sand Point beach on Lake Superior.

Honoring Mother Earth:

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

Teaching respect for Native American culture and the planet are goals the CTI plans to continue for another decade, CTI officials said during the festival.

Zaagkii HeadshotsNonprofit Cedar Tree Institute board member Steve Mattson speaks to supports in July 2009 at the annual CTI Mid-Summer Festival in Marquette, MI

(Photo By Greg Peterson)

“We honor the presence of the Native Americans,” said Marquette banker and CTI board member Steve Mattson.

“It’s tremendous that the (KBIC) have shown the leadership and the vision to have the first greenhouse for native species plants in the U.S. on their native land,” Mattson said.

Working “behind the scenes,” the CTI will continue efforts like the Zaagkii and Manoomin projects because “they are important,” Mattson said.

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

Philanthropic Mattson Family:

Steve Mattson and his family (and friends) have a long history of supporting the Upper Peninsula business community, nonprofit initiatives and people …

“We’re the quiet people and we like to keep it that way”

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

“We’re the quiet people and we like to keep it that way,” Mattson said. “We like to do big things and we can only do big things through each of you.”

The Zaagkii Project contributors include the Marquette Community Foundation, Marquette County Juvenile Court, the M.E. Davenport Foundation, the Kaufman Foundation and the Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation.

Peter White Library :

Pollinating the Minds of our Youth about the importance of bees, butterflies and other pollinators

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Zaagkii Project teens visited the Peter White Public Library in Marquette, MI during the summer of 2009to learn facts about pollinators, native species plants and the effect of both on the food they eat. The teens learned about the various species of indigenous plants in northern Michigan and Midwest – and spread their knowledge to others including the fact that pollinators are keystone to the survival of all life on this planet because the service provided by bees, butterflies and other pollinators are the reason plants, trees, vegetables and fruit grow – and that food is vital to all forms of life. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

Native Plants Northern Light:

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The Borealis Seed Company in Big Bay, MI literally brought Zaagkii Projects students to their knees as the teens helped the owners manage the operation that specializes in native species plants and seeds.
Borealis Seed Company is run by the mother-daughter team of Judy Keast and Suzanne Rabitaille on a 20-acre spread three miles south of Big Bay of which about 5 acres is cultivated. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

Organic Farm:

Turkeys, Goats, Pigs …

Butterflies, Bees, Cranes and Things…

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The Zaagkii students were amazed by all the animals that roam the organic Dancing Crane Farm run by Natasha and David Gill, who understand the importance of protecting pollinators.

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With a plethora of wildlife, Dancing Crane Farm in Skandia, MI has naturally grown and raised vegetables, flowers and more on 20 acres with almost five acres cultivated. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

Zaagkii Project Fellowship:

Teens, college students and older adults …

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When they were not building butterfly houses, mason bee houses and distributing/planting native species plants, the Zaagkii Project students had time to become friends, reflect on their work and enhance social skills during lunches, outdoor bar-b-ques and other time for bonding and fun. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

Nature Naturally:

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Zaagkii project teens have learned a deep appreciation for nature during their many hours spent in the majestic northwoods of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula along breath-taking waterfalls and winding streams with the pungent smell of pollination and bees wafting through the warm air. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

Healthy Lunch thanks to Pollinators:

healthy lunch,lettuce,salad,tomato,cucumber,greens,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Zaagkii Project

Zaagkii Project Northern Michigan University volunteer and student leader Erika Niebler prepared healthy lunches for the students including a large salad in July 2009.
The Zaagkii Project students said their salad with a wide variety of veggies would not have been possible without pollinators to make the lettuce, tomatoes, and other vegetables grow. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Transplanting Native Species:

Herbs/Veggies/Mushrooms …

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Getting their hands in the soil at At Gather’n Greens in Negaunee Township, MI, Zaagkii Project students learned about organic vegetables, indigenous herbs – and the transplanting of veggie and herb seedlings. Beekeeper Lee Ossenheimer and wife Dr. Lisa Long own the organic farm Gather’n Greens along the Dead River in northern Michigan. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

Organic Mushrooms:

Zaagkii Project teens learned about the challenges of growing mushrooms during the chilly, windy and rainy “summer that wasn’t” in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula along a Lake Superior tributary.

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An organic Mushroom growing operation is part of Gather’n Greens, an organic farm near Negaunee, MI owned by Lee Ossenheimer and wife Dr. Lisa Long.

The students learned that the mushrooms are grown by drilling holes in logs that are filled with mushroom spawn. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

American Indian,Native American,youth,bee,bees,Marquette,Michigan,Upper Peninsula,Baraga,teens,teenagers,pollinators,pollen,pollinating,butterflies,butterfly,honeybees,bumblebees,environment,native plants,species extinction

Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project Contacts, Supporters and Related Links:

USFS Success Story hails 2008-2010 Zaagkii Project
Posted 2-02-2010

USFS Success Story on 2008 Zaagkii Project
Posted 8-08-2008

U.S. Forest Service logo/banner

Larry Stritch, USFS National Botanist
Larry Stritch
National Botanist USDA U.S. Forest Service
1400 Independence Ave., SW
Mail stop 1103
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

1-202-205-1279 (Office)

email USFS National Botanist Larry Stritch

Larry Stritch honored for USFS Celebrating Wildflowers website

Above Photo of Larry Stritch from the Arizona Native Plant Society publication entitled “The Plant Press

American Indian,Native American,youth,bee,bees,Marquette,Michigan,Upper Peninsula,Baraga,teens,teenagers,pollinators,pollen,pollinating,butterflies,butterfly,honeybees,bumblebees,environment,native plants,species extinction

USFS wildflowers page

Wildflowers in the Eastern Region

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Jan Schultz, USFS

Botany, Non-native Invasive Species

Special Forest Products Program Leader

USDA Forest Service Eastern Region

626 Wisconsin Avenue, 7th Floor

Milwaukee, WI

53203

1-414-297-1189 (wk)

1-414-944-3963 (fax)

Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Jan Schultz,United States Forest Service,USFS,Milwaukee,wildflowers,bees,butterflies Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Jan Schultz,United States Forest Service,USFS,Milwaukee,wildflowers,bees,butterflies Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Jan Schultz,United States Forest Service,USFS,Milwaukee,wildflowers,bees,butterflies Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Jan Schultz,United States Forest Service,USFS,Milwaukee,wildflowers,bees,butterflies Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Jan Schultz,United States Forest Service,USFS,Milwaukee,wildflowers,bees,butterflies Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Jan Schultz,United States Forest Service,USFS,Milwaukee,wildflowers,bees,butterflies Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Presque Isle,April Lindala,Jan Schukltz,kids,USFS,United States Forest Service,NMU,Northern Michigan University Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Presque Isle,April Lindala,Jan Schukltz,kids,USFS,United States Forest Service,NMU,Northern Michigan University Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Presque Isle,April Lindala,Jan Schukltz,kids,USFS,United States Forest Service,NMU,Northern Michigan University Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Presque Isle,April Lindala,Jan Schukltz,kids,USFS,United States Forest Service,NMU,Northern Michigan University Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Presque Isle,April Lindala,Jan Schukltz,kids,USFS,United States Forest Service,NMU,Northern Michigan University Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Presque Isle,April Lindala,Jan Schukltz,kids,USFS,United States Forest Service,NMU,Northern Michigan University

email Jan Schultz

USFS links and information page about plants, botany, the Zaagkii Project and other efforts to protect pollinators and the importance of native species plants


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Rev. Jon Magnuson

Founder of the three-year (2008-2010) Zaagkii Project

Executive Director of the Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute

402 E. Michigan St.

Marquette, MI

49855

email Rev. Jon Magnuson

906-228-5494 (hm)

906-360-5072 (cell)

Cedar Tree Institute (CTI) Winter 2009 Newsletter

Photobucket Zaagkii Project,teens,illustrator Diana Magnuson,Diana Magnuson,Sherri Bohjanen-Hutter,Anchorage,Alaska,painting,mason bee houses,Grace United Methodist Church,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project

Illustrator Diana Magnuson

Diana Magnuson biography
email Diana Magnuson

Kids Book website on illustrator Diana Magnuson of Marquette, MI

——-

NMU Students Leaders and volunteers for the Cedar Tree Institute and the Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project:

Zaagkii Headshots healthy lunch,salad,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,lettuce,tomato,cucumber,bread,teenagers,teenager,students

Photobucket Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Erika Niebler

Erika is a Northern Michigan University (NMU) student and volunteers for numerous Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute initiatives including the Zaagkii Project, Zaagkii Project photographer, NMU Lutheran Campus Ministry student leader and photographer

1-763-670-0611

2008 Zaagkii Project pixs with Sarah Swanson 2008 Zaagkii Project pixs with Sarah Swanson 2008 Zaagkii Project pixs with Sarah Swanson and Diana Magnuson Photobucket 2008 Zaagkii Project pixs with Sarah Swanson

Sarah Swanson

Sarah is a NMU student leader, volunteers for numerous nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute Projects including the Zaagkii Project, Northern Michigan University (NMU) Student leader, Lutheran Campus Ministry leader including visited Nicaragua and educated Americans on importance of fair trade with Nicaraguan coffee farmers and others, served as NMU EarthKeeper (NMU EK) Student Team project director.

1-906-399-7113
email NMU Lutheran Campus Ministry

Beekeeper. Beekeeper Jim Hayward,Negaunee Twonship,Apiary,honeybees,Amanda Emerson,Tanya Nelson,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Michigan,Upper Peninsula,Colony Collapse Disorder,bees,pollinators Amanda Emerson,Eco-Christmas,Northern Michigan University,Peter White Public Library,Christmas,2009 Photobucket Photobucket Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Amanda Emerson

Amanda is a NMU student leader, and volunteers for numerous nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute projects including the Zaagkii Project and serves as project coordinator for the NMU EarthKeeper Student team

847-791-5693

——

Keweenaw Bay Indian Community,KBIC

Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC)

Photobucket Photobucket

KBIC Tribal Council President Warren C. “Chris” Swartz Jr.

KBIC Vice Chair Susan LaFernier

906-353-6623

Todd Warner, Director of KBIC Natural Resource Department (NRD)

906-524-5757

Photobucket Photobucket

Evelyn Ravindran, KBIC NRD Natural Resources Specialist

KBIC NRD employees help build butterfly houses in 2008:

Keweenaw Bay Indian Community,KBIC,tribal youth,youth,bees,butterflies,butterfly houses,bee,2008 Keweenaw Bay Indian Community,KBIC,tribal youth,youth,bees,butterflies,butterfly houses,bee,2008 Photobucket Photobucket

Katie Kruse, NRD Environment specialist

Char Beesley, Environment Specialist

Kit Laux, NRD Water Quality Specialist

Kim Klopstein, one of the summer youth supervisors for the KBIC Summer Youth Program

906-201-0020

NMU Center for Native American Studies banner/llogo

Northern Michigan University Center for Native American Studies (CNAS)

Photobucket Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Presque Isle,April Lindala,Jan Schukltz,kids,USFS,United States Forest Service,NMU,Northern Michigan University Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket

April Lindala, Director

112F Whitman Hall

906-227-1397 (office)
906-227-1396 (fax)

Zaagkii Headshots

NMU CNAS Professor Kenneth Pitawanakwat, Anishinaabemowin Instructor
112D Whitman Hall
Phone: 906-227-1504
Fax: 906-227-1396
E-mail: kpitawan@nmu.edu
Biographical profile

Northern Michigan University,NMU CNAS Professor Adriana Greci Green,NMU,NMU Center for Native American Studies,Professor Adriana Greci Green,Zaagkii Project,Native American

NMU CNAS Asst. Professor Adriana Greci Green
112C Whitman Hall
Phone: 906-227-2374
Fax: 906-227-1396
E-mail: agreen@nmu.edu
Biographical profile

NMU students Zaagkii Project presentation to USFS in Milwaukee

NMU Brochure/report on Zaagkii Project: Seven edible and medicinal native plants used by Ojibway traditional culture in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula


2009 Zaagkii Project Levi and Leona Tadgerson Native American Teens 7-7-09 2009 Zaagkii Project Levi and Leona Tadgerson Native American Teens 7-7-09 2009 Zaagkii Project Levi and Leona Tadgerson Native American Teens 7-7-09 Photobucket
NMU CNAS Zaagkii Project interns: Levi Tadgerson of Negaunee and sister, Leora Tadgerson of Marquette, members of Bay Mills Indian Community

906-360-0451 (Levi)

USFS Zaagkii Project contacts:

Jane Cliff, USFS Public Relations in Milwaukee

414-297-3664

Angie Lucas, contractor, Hiawatha National Forest Greenhouse Manager

Photobucket Photobucket

906-228-8491

Terry Miller, forest botanist at the Hiawatha National Forest Office in Escanaba, MI

U.S. Forest Service success story,USFS,United States Forest Service,U.S. Department of Agriculture,Monarch,butterfly,butterflies,Marquette,Michigan,National Monarch Butterfly Workshop,Hiawatha National Forest,forest,botanist,botany,Deb LeBlanc,Deb Le Blanc,Terry Miller,plug,Escanaba

Botanist Terry Miller is pictured planting plugs in this USFS photo

USDA USFS Hiawatha Forest District

2727 North Lincoln Road

Escanaba, MI

49825

906-786-4062
906-789-3319

Hiawatha National Forest website

Hiawatha National Forest Service offices

Deb Le Blanc, WestSide Plant Ecologist at the Hiawatha National Forest office in Munising, MI

(Does Monarch Workshops)

Hiawatha National Forest hosted a National Monarch Butterfly Workshop during June 2008 in Marquette, MI

U.S. Forest Service success story,USFS,United States Forest Service,U.S. Department of Agriculture,Monarch,butterfly,butterflies,Marquette,Michigan,National Monarch Butterfly Workshop,Hiawatha National Forest,forest,botanist,botany,Deb LeBlanc,Deb Le Blanc,Terry Miller,plug,Escanaba

Deb Le Blanc, USDA
400 Munising Ave.
Munising, MI
49862

email Deb Le Blanc
906-387-2512 ext. 19

U.S. Forest Service success story,USFS,United States Forest Service,U.S. Department of Agriculture,Monarch,butterfly,butterflies,Marquette,Michigan,National Monarch Butterfly Workshop,Hiawatha National Forest,forest,botanist,botany,Deb LeBlanc,Deb Le Blanc,Terry Miller,plug,Escanaba

The Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation:

The Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis Fitzhugh (Miller) Reynolds,Mrs. Maxwell K. Reynolds,Jr.,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette founding father Peter White,Peter White,Joan (Reynolds) Miller,Don Miller,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Manoomin Project,bees,butterflies,wild rice,philanthropy,philanthropist,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation Inc.,Wells Fargo Bank

Phyllis Fitzhugh (Miller) Reynolds (Mrs. Maxwell K. Reynolds, Jr.) of Marquette, Mich., passed away Nov. 10, 2009 at the age of 89.
She was preceded in death by her husband, Maxwell, the great-grandson of Marquette founding father Peter White, in 1988

CTI honors Joan (Reynolds) and Don Miller
Joan is one of four daughters of Phyllis and Max Reynolds.

The Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis Fitzhugh (Miller) Reynolds,Mrs. Maxwell K. Reynolds,Jr.,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette founding father Peter White,Peter White,Joan (Reynolds) Miller,Don Miller,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Manoomin Project,bees,butterflies,wild rice,philanthropy,philanthropist,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation Inc.,Wells Fargo Bank The Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis Fitzhugh (Miller) Reynolds,Mrs. Maxwell K. Reynolds,Jr.,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette founding father Peter White,Peter White,Joan (Reynolds) Miller,Don Miller,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Manoomin Project,bees,butterflies,wild rice,philanthropy,philanthropist,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation Inc.,Wells Fargo Bank

Alyson “Aly” Luff (left) of Marquette and her mother Joan Miller at the 2009 Cedar Tree Institute MidSummer Festival in Marquette.

Alyson has taken photos of numerous Cedar Tree Institute projects and events.

The Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis Fitzhugh (Miller) Reynolds,Mrs. Maxwell K. Reynolds,Jr.,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette founding father Peter White,Peter White,Joan (Reynolds) Miller,Don Miller,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Manoomin Project,bees,butterflies,wild rice,philanthropy,philanthropist,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation Inc.,Wells Fargo Bank The Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis Fitzhugh (Miller) Reynolds,Mrs. Maxwell K. Reynolds,Jr.,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette founding father Peter White,Peter White,Joan (Reynolds) Miller,Don Miller,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Manoomin Project,bees,butterflies,wild rice,philanthropy,philanthropist,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation Inc.,Wells Fargo Bank

Joan and Don Miller attend the 2009 CTI MidSummer Festival.

The Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis Fitzhugh (Miller) Reynolds,Mrs. Maxwell K. Reynolds,Jr.,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette founding father Peter White,Peter White,Joan (Reynolds) Miller,Don Miller,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Manoomin Project,bees,butterflies,wild rice,philanthropy,philanthropist,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation Inc.,Wells Fargo Bank

Joan Miller (center) with other Zaagkii Project supporters at the 2008 and 2009 CTI MidSummer festival.

Cool Cities website and the Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation

Websites that list philanthropy organizations including the Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation

Phyllis And Max Reynolds Foundation Inc
Box 580 Trust Dept. Wells Fargo Bank
101 W Washington St
Marquette, MI
49855-0580

Alyson Luff,Aly Luff,Phyllis And Max Reynolds Foundation,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,nonprofit,Cedar Tree Institute,photographer,suicide prevention,American Foundation for Suicide Prevention,AFSP,Out of the Darkness Community Walks,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette 2010 Out of the Darkness Community Walk,2010 Out of the Darkness Community Walk,Marquette Commons,teen suicide,teens,youth suicide,suicide
Alyson “Aly” Luff is the granddaughter of the late Phyllis And Max Reynolds, whose foundation supports the Zaagkii Project and other nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute initiatives.

A Zaagkii Project photographer, Aly is active in suicide prevention organizations including the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) and its annual Out of the Darkness Community Walks.
Alyson Luff,Aly Luff,Phyllis And Max Reynolds Foundation,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,nonprofit,Cedar Tree Institute,photographer,suicide prevention,American Foundation for Suicide Prevention,AFSP,Out of the Darkness Community Walks,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette 2010 Out of the Darkness Community Walk,2010 Out of the Darkness Community Walk,Marquette Commons,teen suicide,teens,youth suicide,suicide
Alyson Luff,Aly Luff,Phyllis And Max Reynolds Foundation,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,nonprofit,Cedar Tree Institute,photographer,suicide prevention,American Foundation for Suicide Prevention,AFSP,Out of the Darkness Community Walks,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette 2010 Out of the Darkness Community Walk,2010 Out of the Darkness Community Walk,Marquette Commons,teen suicide,teens,youth suicide,suicide

Out of the Darkness Community Walks on myspace
Alyson Luff,Aly Luff,Phyllis And Max Reynolds Foundation,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,nonprofit,Cedar Tree Institute,photographer,suicide prevention,American Foundation for Suicide Prevention,AFSP,Out of the Darkness Community Walks,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette 2010 Out of the Darkness Community Walk,2010 Out of the Darkness Community Walk,Marquette Commons,teen suicide,teens,youth suicide,suicide

The 2010 Marquette, MI Out of the Darkness Community Walk will be held on Sept 18, 2010 starting at the Marquette Commons
9 a.m. Registration
10 a.m. Walk begins

For more information on the Marquette Out of the Darkness Community Walk email Alyson Luff or call 1-906-235-1969

——-

The Kaufman Foundation in Marquette, MI

City of Marquette names Kaufman Sports Complex

Kaufman Auditorium in Marquette, MI and related Foundation projects

Kaufman Foundation helps youth hockey

Kaufman Foundation and Graveraet School G.R.E.A.T. Project

Kaufman Foundation helps city of Marquette

——-

Marquette Community Foundation

Marquette Community Foundation
P.O. Box 37
401 East Fair Avenue
Marquette, MI 49855-2951

1-906-226-7666 (office)
1-906-226-2104 (fax)

Become a fan of the Marquette Community Foundation on Facebook

Marquette Community Foundation staff

Dr. Carole L. Touchinski, CFRM
Executive Director

Linda Vallier
FIMS Operator

Dani Thoune
Programs Director

Photobucket

Marquette Community Foundation Boards of Directors:

President Robert Cowell
Vice President Mark Canale
Treasurer John Marshall
Secretary Maura Davenport

Board members:
Craig Stien
Stu Bradley
Marilyn Andrew
Michael Roy
John Maki
Don Mourand
Katy Martin
John Lenten
Roger Zappa

——-
M.E. Davenport Foundation logo,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,philanthropy,philanthropist,bee,bees,pollinators,pollinate,butterfly,butterflies,mason bee,honeybee

The M.E. Davenport Foundation
415 E. Fulton St. SE
Warren Hall
Grand Rapids, MI.
49503

1-616-732-1098

M.E. Davenport Foundation supports Cedar Tree Institute initiatives like the Zaagkii Project and native species plants

Davenport University

The M.E. Davenport Foundation Board of Directors:

Margaret Moceri, President
Gregory Moceri, Vice-President/Treasurer
Mary Sneden Sullivan, Secretary
Marcia Sneden, Trustee
Donald Maine, Trustee
James Setchfield, M.D., Trustee

——-

Rick Pietila does Tai Chi July 2009
Martial artist Rick Pietila of Marquette, MI
Rick Pietila does Tai Chi July 2009 Rick Pietila does Tai Chi July 2009
Pietilla is an instructor of San Shou, Tai Chi and other martial arts.
Rick Pietila does Tai Chi July 2009 Rick Pietila does Tai Chi July 2009
Rick Pietila’s other ongoing amazing adventures include traveling with several legendary Rock and Roll groups including being a guitar tech for the band Boston and traveled into South America with the band Stryper.

Photobucket Rick Pietila does Tai Chi July 2009

Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute Winter 2008 newsletter that mentions Rick Pietila

Rick Pietila does Tai Chi July 2009

Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute Winter 2009 newsletter that mentions Rick Pietila

Zaagkii Project story in Sept. 2009 Marquette Monthly

Zaagkii Project videos on youtube

Zaagkii Project videos on bliptv

Zaagkii Project wordpress blog

United State Forest Service (USFS) Celebrating Wildflowers and Pollinators websites

Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute in Marquette, MI

Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC)

Marquette County Juvenile Court

Marquette County Juvenile Court and Project WEAVE

Jim Rule at Hayward bee farm Photobucket Jim Rule at Hayward bee farm

Jim Rule, a child care counselor at Marquette County Youth Home, is pictured on June 25, 2009 on a Zaagkii Project outing to the apiary owned by beekeeper Jim Hayward


Borealis Seed Company
Big Bay, Michigan

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Run by mother-daughter team of Judy Keast and Suzanne Rabitaille cultivating about 5 acres of a 20-acre spread three miles south of Big Bay, Michigan.

http://www.ltbbodawa-nsn.gov/index.html


Dancing Crane Farm

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Owned by Natasha and David Gill

Dancing Crane Farm has naturally grown and raised vegetables, flowers and more on 20 acres with almost five acres cultvated

Natasha and David Gill
Dancing Crane Farm
348 Lawson Road
Skandia, MI 49885

906-942-7975

email the organic Dancing Crane Farm

info@dancingcranefarm.com

http://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/internships/farmdetails.php?FarmName=&City=&State=MI&Keyword=&allDate=0&page=1&FarmID=1957

Assorted vegetables, herbs,flowers,and seedlings
Custom workshops, ongoing classes, farm tours, apprenticeships, volunteer opportunities, and an annual Harvest Party open to the public.
Produce can be purchased at the Marquette, Gwinn, and Munising Farmers Markets and at the Dancing Crane Farm.
Open June-October.

Beekeepers:

Dr. Jim Hayward

Zaagkii Headshots Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Jim Hayward Bee Farm Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Photobucket Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Dr. Jim and Martha Hayward
103A Buffalo Rd.
Negaunee, MI
49866

906-475-7582

email Negaunee, MI beekeeper Dr. Jim Hayward


Beekeepers:

Gather’n Greens
Negaunee Township, Michigan

Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer,Lauren OssenheimerGather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer,Lauren OssenheimerPhotobucketGather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer,Lauren Ossenheimer

906-475-9338
(no website yet)

Owned by Lee Ossenheimer and his wife, Dr. Lisa Long in Negaunee Township, MI along the Dead River.

Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer,Lauren Ossenheimer Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer,Lauren Ossenheimer Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer,Lauren Ossenheimer Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer,Lauren Ossenheimer Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer,Lauren Ossenheimer Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer,Lauren Ossenheimer

The couple raise bees, make honey, grow mushrooms and grow seedlings for transplanting like peppers, tomatoes and about numerous herbs such as basil.

The couple has three children active in their nature-oriented, organic business:
Jesse Ossenheimer, 8; Lauren Ossenheimer, 5; and Alex Ossenheimer, 4.


Beekeeper:
Photobucket
Jon Kniskern
Marquette, MI

Beekeeper Jon Kniskern is quoted in a March 3, 2009 article on a University of Minnesota annual “Short Course” entitled “Beekeeping in Northern Climates” at Borlaug Hall on the St. Paul campus
The story was published in the Minnesota Daily newspaper in Minneapolis/St. Paul


Zaagkii Headshots Photobucket Photobucket Upper Peninsula Children's Museum,Jim Edwards,Nheena Weyer Ittner,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,bee hive,bee,butterfly,monarch,honeybee,Marquette,Michigan Photobucket Upper Peninsula Children's Museum,Jim Edwards,Nheena Weyer Ittner,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,bee hive,bee,butterfly,monarch,honeybee,Marquette,Michigan Photobucket

Jim Edwards at the Upper Peninsula Children’s Museum who is in charge of “General Programming and Explainers Director”

Jim Edwards,Upper Peninsula Children's Museum,Monarch,butterfly,U.P. Children's Museum,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project Photobucket

Edwards teamed with the Zaagkii Project students to build a giant monarch butterfly in 2008 and a big bee hive in 2009 using art-related items at the museum in Marquette, MI

Upper Peninsula Children’s Museum

123 W. Baraga Avenue

Marquette, MI

49855

1-906-226-3911 (office)
1-906- 226-7065 (fax)

email Nheena Weyer Ittner, director of the U.P. Children’s Museum

email Jim Edwards, museum General Programming and Explainers Director

NativeVillage.org,Gina Blotz,Native Village Publications

American Indian,Native American,youth,bee,bees,Marquette,Michigan,Upper Peninsula,Baraga,teens,teenagers,pollinators,pollen,pollinating,butterflies,butterfly,honeybees,bumblebees,environment,native plants,species extinction

Zaagkii Project banner graphics by Gina Boltz, the director and editor of Native Village Publications including NativeVillage.org and a champion and fighter for Native American and Indigenous youth causes

Nativevillage.org main Zaagkii Page

NativeVillage.org,Gina Blotz,Native Village Publications

The International Council of Thirteen Indigenous Grandmothers: Internet Youth Forum on NativeVillage.org

NativeVillage.org 2009 Zaagkii Story and photos

NativeVillage.org 2008 Zaagkii Story and photos

Zaagkii Project Credit for music used in videos:

Music on Zaagkii Project videos courtesy of Chicago area band Dragon Fire Parade, which has Upper Peninsula roots

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

Photo caption:
Members of the Chicago area band Dragon Fire Parade pictured are Andy Wicklund (upper left), Chris Hammond (upper right), Peter Nemanich (lower left) and Tim Obert (lower right).

Dragon Fire Parade:

Andy Wicklund, Guitar
Tim Obert, Guitar
Peter Nemanich, Bass
Chris Hammond, Drums

email Dragon Fire Parade


Cedar Tree Institute,Zaagkii Project,band,Terracotta half-life,Jerry Kippola,Guitar,Aaron Kippola,Alto Saxophone,Percussion,Obadiah  Metivier,Bass Guitar,Vocals,Jennie Peano,Steve Leuthold,Baritone Saxaphone,Tenor Saxophone,Flute,Dan Schaefer,Drums,Emmanuel Kawedi,Congas

Official band of the Cedar Tree Institute/Zaagkii Project annual Midsummer Festival:

Terracotta half-life

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

Terracotta half-life biography

Bio about the one and only Obadiah Metivier, a band member, overall techie genious and Zaagkii Project volunteer webmaster and technical guru

Jerry Kippola, Guitar

Aaron Kippola, Alto Saxophone, Percussion

Obadiah Metivier, Bass Guitar, Vocals, Percussion

Jennie Peano, Vocals, Percussion

Steve Leuthold, Baritone and Tenor Saxophone, Flute

Dan Schaefer, Drums

Emmanuel Kawedi, Congas, Percussion, Vocals

Alumni – Keyboards, Guitars, Drums, Sax, Trumpet, Congas, Timbales, etc.


Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

Upcoming Shows:

Wed 2/10/2010: Upfront
Fri 2/26/2010: Harley’s Lounge
Fri 3/12/2010: Marquette Food Co-op Meeting of Owners
Wed 3/24/2010: Upfront
Tue 7/13/2010: Menominee Summer Concert Series

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

Marquette Mining Journal feature story #2 on Zaagkii Project on 12-13-08 about the first year of protecting pollinators

Marquette Mining Journal feature story #1 on Zaagkii Project on 7-14-08 about 208 annual Cedar Tree Institute annual Mid-Summer Festival in Marquette, MI

News From Indian Country (NFIC) feature story on Zaagkii Project

Indian Country Today feature stories on Zaagkii Project:

Part 1: Pollinator Preservation

Part 2: Sand Point Restoration
——-

NAISA,Native American and Indigenous Studies Association,Tuscon,Arizona,Zaagkii Project,Leora Tadgerson,Professor Adriana Greci Green,NMU,CNAS,Students,Northern Michigan University,The University of Arizona,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project

Zaakii Project intern Leora Tadgerson to participate in a roundtable at the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association (NAISA) 2010 National Conference on May 20-22, 2010 in Tuscon, AZ

Zaagkii Project and Northern Michigan Center for Native American Studies (NMU CNAS) participants:

NAISA,Native American and Indigenous Studies Association,Tuscon,Arizona,Zaagkii Project,Leora Tadgerson,Professor Adriana Greci Green,NMU,CNAS,Students,Northern Michigan University,The University of Arizona,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project

NAISA,Native American and Indigenous Studies Association,Tuscon,Arizona,Zaagkii Project,Leora Tadgerson,Professor Adriana Greci Green,NMU,CNAS,Students,Northern Michigan University,The University of Arizona,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project

NMU CNAS Conference info:
SATURDAY, MAY 22, 2010
12:00-1:45 p.m.
118 ROUNDTABLE:
“Engaging Students through Community Action and Service”
Organizer & Chair:
Adriana Greci Green, Northern Michigan University

Participants include:
Leora Tadgerson, Zaagkii Project intern from Northern Michigan University Center for Native American Studies
Damien Lee, Trent University, Canada
Nicholas Estes, University of South Dakota
Karla Tait, University of South Dakota
Leya Hale, University of South Dakota
Linc Kesler, University of British Columbia, Canada

NAISA 2010 Conference Program details
Preliminary Daily Schedule
The NAISA 2010 Conference is sponsored by the American Indian Studies at The University of Arizona

NAISA,Native American and Indigenous Studies Association,Tuscon,Arizona,Zaagkii Project,Leora Tadgerson,Professor Adriana Greci Green,NMU,CNAS,Students,Northern Michigan University,The University of Arizona,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project

NAISA staff photo

Robert Warrior, NAISA President 2009-2010

email organizers of the NAISA 2010 Conference

Contact information:
Sunny Lybarger
1-520-626-7695
Tsianina Lomawaima
1-520-621-5083

Hotel registration info and the deadline for NAISA Group Room Rate April 18, 2010

1-520-742-6000

Westin La Paloma
3800 East Sunrise Drive
Tucson, AZ
85718

Native Times newspaper aka Native American Times Zaagkii Project pollinators story

Turtle Island News:

http://www.turtleisland.org/discussion/viewtopic.php?p=9683#9683

Marquette Monthly Nov. 2008 (scroll down):

http://www.mmnow.com/z_current_a/b/c/city_notes.html

Tree Hugger: (This article appeared on over 1,000 websites)

http://www.treehugger.com/files/2008/10/zaagkii–wings-seeds-project.php

Zaagkii KBIC newsletter (scroll down to page 4):

http://www.kbic-nsn.gov/files/newsletter/Sept_2008.pdf

Sault Ste. Marie Band of Chippewa Story on Zaagkii Project (Scroll down to page 7)

http://www.saulttribe.com/index2.php?option=com_docman&task=doc_view&gid=959&Itemid=266

Great Story in Native Villge Web:

http://www.nativevillage.org/Messages%20from%20the%20People/MesPeo%20KBIC%20Tribal%20Youth%20Zaagkii%20Project/kbic_tribal_youth_protect_pollin1.htm

Earth Times – London:

http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/show/michigan-teens-native-american-youth,593342.shtml

Good News Network National Newspaper:

http://www.goodnewsnetwork.org

To see story – sign up for free 30 day trial by click on headline of story

Monarch Watch:

Author Lynn M. Rosenblatt,Monarch Magic,Monarch Magic!,book,author,monarch,butterfly,buterflies,monarch butterfly,Lynn M. Rosenblatt

Monarch Author Lynn M. Rosenblatt (above with children) who wrote the book MONARCH MAGIC!

Photobucket

——-
The Pollinator Partnership
c/o The Coevolution Institute
Laurie Davies Adams, Executive Director
423 Washington St, 5th Fl
San Francisco, CA
94111-2339

1-415-362-1137 (office)
1-415-362-3070 (fax)

Pollinator Partnership,pollinatorpartnership.org,pollinators,bees,butterflies,pollinate

Pollinator Partnership

Pollinator Week is June 21-27, 2010

The fourth annual National Pollinator Week will be held from June 21-27, 2010.

Think about an event at your school, garden, church, store, etc.

Pollinators positively effect all our lives – let’s save them and celebrate them!

Pollinator Partnership,pollinatorpartnership.org,pollinators,bees,butterflies,pollinate

Pollinator Partnership Movie

Pollinator News from Pollinator Partnership
email the Pollinator Partnership

North American Pollinator Protection Campaign
Working to protect the pollinators of the North American continent

North American Pollinator Protection Campaign #2 (NAPPC)

emails:
info@NAPPC.org; LDA@pollinator.org

415-362-3070 (fax)

Lots of different handouts & ideas for National Pollinator Week

——-

Numerous Monarch related links:

http://www.kidsgardening.com/pollinator/curriculum/resources.php

http://www.insecta-inspecta.com/butterflies/monarch/index.html

http://www.nhptv.org/natureworks/monarch.htm

http://www.learner.org/jnorth/monarch

U.S. Department of Agriculture Headquarters and “The People’s Garden” in Washington, D.C. – Bringing Nature into the Public Realm: Green The Grounds

Feature stories on the People’s Garden in Washington, D.C. featured on discovery.com that is “Bringing Nature into the Public Realm: Green The Grounds” at the U.S. Department of Agriculture Headquarters:

Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) story on ground broken on USDA USFS “The People’s Garden” in Washington, D.C.

USFS The Peoples Garden in Washington, D.C.

USFS News Release on The Peoples Garden

USFS sustainable operations information and links to articles including The Peoples Garden

Wikipedia on Monarch butterflies and Lepidotera migration, a phenomenon where butterflies or moths migrate over long distances to areas where they cannot settle for long periods of time.

Photo by Mila Zinkova of Monarch butterflies migration and cluster on Nov. 25, 2007 in Santa Cruz to spend a winter via Wikipedia Creative Commons. During migration Monarch butterflies travel up to three thousand miles.

email Mila Zinkova

Photograph by Wikipedia user Bfpage of some of the overwintering monarch butterflies in Feb. 2000 at a preserve outside of Angangueo, Mexico. One tree is completely covered in butterflies.

Artwork of Migrating butterflies aka Lepidoptera migration art

Artistic picture by Pilar Murillo of Spain
Wikipedia username: Pilar

flickr username: izarbeltza


Wikipedia on Goldenrod

Goldenrod photo by Kurt Stueber aka Kurt Stüber via Wikipedia creative commons

email Kurt Stueber

Goldenrod Photo by Huw Williams – Wikipedia username Huwmanbeing

Goldenrod flowers photographed in western Fountain County, Indiana on September 15, 207 via Wikipedia creative commons

Goldenrod and visiting Cerceris wasp by Wiki user Hardyplants via Wikipedia creative commons

Goldenrod Photo by Georg Slickers taken on August 15, 2005 in Berlin, Germany via Wikipedia creative commons
——-

Wikipedia on Monarchs

Wikipedia page with a Female Monarch photo in May 2007 by Kenneth Dwain Harrelson

Wikipedia page with Male Monarch photo by Derek Ramsey (Wikipedia user name Ram-Man) at the Tyler Arboretum

Bees disappearing around the world:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pollinator_decline

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bees_and_toxic_chemicals

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colony_Collapse_Disorder

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pesticide_toxicity_to_bees

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imidacloprid_effects_on_bee_population

http://www.burtsbees.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ContentView?contentPageId=531&catalogId=10051&storeId=10001&langId=-1

http://www.polinator.org

http://www.vanishingbees.com

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diseases_of_the_honey_bee

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endangered_arthropod

Wikipedia Honeybee Photos by Björn Appel, Wikipedia Username Warden.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Warden

Edit by Waugsberg (cropped)

A honeybee on an apiary, cooling by flapping its wings in Tübingen-Hagelloch.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c5/Honeybee-cooling_cropped.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/df/Honeybee-cooling.jpg

Wiki Bee photos by Waugsberg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Waugsberg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/dc/Biene_88a.jpg

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:Biene_88a.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b8/Bienen_im_Flug_52e.jpg

Bumblebees: Space For Nature Garden biodiversity forum

http://www.wildlife-gardening.org.uk/default.asp?gallery=Galleries\Animals\Insects\Bumblebees\bombus-pascuorum-040616.xml

Bumblebee Photo Copyright Richard Burkmar 2004. Permission is hereby granted for anyone to use this image for non-commercial purposes which are of benefit to the natural environment.

Richard Burkmar (editor of Space for Nature) graduated from the University College of Cardiff in 1984 with a degree in zoology and a PhD in avian ecology in 1989. He currently works for Merseyside Environmental Advisory Service where he manages the North Merseyside Biodiversity Action Plan (Liverpool, St. Helens, Knowsley and Sefton Boroughs).

Bumblebees: Buckingham Nurseries and Garden Centre

http://www.buckingham-nurseries.co.uk/acatalog/bumblebees.html

Bumblebee photo by Oxford Bee Company/Buckingham Nurseries and Garden Centre

Bumblebees by Christopher O’Toole

http://www.buckingham-nurseries.co.uk/acatalog/Index_Pollination_Bees_27.html#33171

Chris O’Toole is the director of Bee Systematics and Biology Unit at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History.

He has written many books on insect natural history including Bees of the World and Alien Empire.

Pictures and information provided by the Oxford Bee Company & Buckingham Nurseries and Garden Centre website

Wind Pollinated plants like Rye are important but are not food sources for pollinators:

Wind Pollinated Rye photo by Paul Billiet and Shirley Burchill

http://www.saburchill.com/chapters/chap0044.html

Wikipedia on Pollination:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pollination

Photo by By Debi Vort (Wikipedia Username Debivort) of an Andrena bee collects pollen among the stamens of a rose. The female carpel structure appears rough and globular to the left. The bee’s stash of pollen is on its hind leg.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Bee_pollenating_a_rose.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Debivort

A European honey bee collects nectar, while pollen collects on its body.

A European honey bee (Apis mellifera) extracts nectar from an Aster flower using its proboscis. Tiny hairs covering the bee’s body maintain a slight electrostatic charge, causing pollen from the flower’s anthers to stick to the bee, allowing for pollination when the bee moves on to another flower.

Photo by John Severns (Wikipedia username Severnjc)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:European_honey_bee_extracts_nectar.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Severnjc

Blueberries being pollinated by bumblebees. Bumblebee hives need to be bought each year as the queens must hibernate (unlike honey bees). They are used nonetheless as they offer advantages with certain fruits as blueberries (such as the fact that they are active even at colder outdoor ambient temperature) A picture showing blueberry pollination by bumblebees, aswell as the system of furrow irrigation using siphon tubes. Pictures were taken at “blueberry fields”, Koersel, Belgium.

A picture showing blueberry pollination by bumblebees, as well as the system of furrow irrigation using siphon tubes. Pictures were taken in July 2008 at “blueberry fields”, Koersel, Belgium.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:BlueberryPollinationByBumblebees.jpg

Photo by Kristof Van der Poorten Wikipedia username KVDP

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:KVDP

http://kvdp.blogspot.com

http://healingweb.blogspot.com

Environmental Health Science of Columbia University

60 Haven Ave.

Room 100

New York, NY

10032

http://www.mailman.hs.columbia.edu/ehs/index.html

Wikipedia on Cultivars & Hybrids:

A cultivar is a particular variety of a plant species or hybrid that is being cultivated and/or is recognised as a cultivar under the ICNCP. The concept of cultivar is driven by pragmatism, and serves the practical needs of horticulture, agriculture, forestry, etc.

The plant chosen as a cultivar may have been bred deliberately, selected from plants in cultivation, or discovered in the wild. Cultivars can be asexual clones or seed-raised. Clones are genetically identical and will appear so when grown under the same conditions.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cultivar

Viola ‘Clear Crystals Apricot’, a hybrid cross viola (Viola x hybrida), Victoria, Australia. Wikipedia photo by John O’Neill (Wikipedia username Jjron)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User_talk:Jjron

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special:EmailUser/Jjron

Bee Movie:

http://www.beemovie.com

Created in 2007 by Jerry Seinfeld and DreamWorks Animation

Keweenaw Peninsula: Michigan’s Copper Country:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copper_mining_in_Michigan

http://www.unr.edu/sb204/geology/westernh.html

West Virginia White Butterfly & killer Garlic Mustard Seed plants:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Virginia_White

http://www.cbgarden.org/blog/index.php/tag/west-virginia-white-butterfly

http://leapbio.org/west_virginia_white.php

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/5a/3402_white_WV_ws.jpg

West Virginia White, Pieris virginiensis on wild mustard Photo by Randy L Emmitt

http://www.rlephoto.com/butterflies/white_wv01.htm

Butterflies/Moths:

The Butterfly Site:

http://www.thebutterflysite.com

Children’s butterfly links:

http://www.monarchbutterflyusa.com/Links.htm

Butterfly Encounters:

http://www.butterflyencounters.com

Butterflys and Moths of North America:

http://www.butterfliesandmoths.org

Opler, Paul A., Harry Pavulaan, Ray E. Stanford, Michael Pogue, coordinators. 2006. Butterflies and Moths of North America. Bozeman, MT: NBII Mountain Prairie Information Node. http://www.butterfliesandmoths.org

Deciduous forests:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deciduous

Viceroys:

Viceroy Butterfly mimics Monarchs

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viceroy_butterfly

Wikipedia Viceroy photo by Piccolo “Pic” Namek

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:PiccoloNamek

Viceroy:

http://www.nhptv.org/natureworks/viceroy.htm

Photo by William T. Hark

Butterfly & endangered species hibernacula:

http://www.fws.gov/midwest/Endangered/lists/michigan-cty.html

http://www.naturenorth.com/summer/bgarden/bttgrdF.html

http://entweb.clemson.edu/museum/buttrfly/local/bfly12.htm

http://actazool.nhmus.hu/48/konvicka.pdf

http://earthcaretaker.com/naturalization/llamb.html

Mourning Cloaks aka Morning Cloaks:

http://www.sierrapotomac.org/W_Needham/MourningCloak_060319.htm

http://www.bentler.us/eastern-washington/insects/mourning-cloak.aspx

http://www.ivyhall.district96.k12.il.us/4th/kkhp/1insects/mourningcloak.html

http://www.naturenorth.com/spring/bug/mcloak/Fmcloak.html

Mason bees – bee houses in wood:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mason_bee

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6c/Osmia_rufa_couple_(aka).jpg

Photo of an Red Mason Bee couple (osmia rufa) by André Karwath of German Wikipedia also known as AKA (André Karwath):

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Aka

Mason Bees:

http://www.farminfo.org/bees/mason-bees.htm

http://www.everythingabout.net/articles/biology/animals/arthropods/insects/bees/mason_bee

Photo by Kim Taylor of Bruce Coleman Inc.

http://www.masonbeehomes.com/bee_houses.php

http://www.pollinator.com/mason_homes.htm

http://www.insectpix.net/Homes_for_bees.htm

Brownfield sites:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brownfields

http://ncrs.fs.fed.us/4902/focus/restoration/brownfield

Mass Mill – copper processing waste (stamp sands) cleanup:

(search for KBIC in following document)

http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/programs/tribalgov/ImprovingPartnerships.pdf

http://www.uprcd.org/projects.asp

http://www.upea.com/filesfordownloading/Baragadraft.pdf

Manoomin Project:

Manoomin Project: Restoring wild rice to seven remote Upper Peninusla lakes, stream as students planted over 1 ton of wild rice seeds with help from elders with the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community
Another collaboration between the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute and the Keweenaw bay Indian Community

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

http://www.indiancountry.com/content.cfm?id=1096416108

http://www.cedartreeinstitute.org/wildrice2007.html

http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/show/news_press_release,215966.%20shtml

http://blog.americanfeast.com/indigenous_food

http://www.goodnewsdaily.com/show_story.php?ID=3500

Manoomin Project Videos:

http://blip.tv/file/549632
http://blip.tv/file/341528

Manoomin Project counselor Dave Anthony, who belongs to the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa (Ottawa) Indian, and Northern Michigan University Center for Native American studies:

http://webb.nmu.edu/Centers/NativeAmericanStudies/SiteSections/Calendar/IEDSHighlights.shtml

http://webb.nmu.edu/Centers/NativeAmericanStudies/SiteSections/AboutUs/AboutUs.shtml

Dreamcatcher:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dreamcatcher_(Native_American)

http://www.dreamcatcher.com/home.php

Northern white cedar:

http://forestry.about.com/library/tree/blntwh.htm

More on honeybee decline:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pollinator_decline

http://www.masterbeekeeper.org/pdf/pollination.pdf

The Value of Honey Bees As Pollinators of U.S. Crops in 2000 by Drs. Roger Morse and Nicholas Calderone of Cornell University (2000) :

Colony Collapse Disorder (or CCD) is a poorly understood phenomenon in which worker bees from a beehive or Western honey bee colony abruptly disappear. While such disappearances have occurred throughout the history of apiculture, the term Colony Collapse Disorder was first applied to a drastic rise in the number of disappearances of Western honey bee colonies in North America in late 2006.

European beekeepers observed a similar phenomenon in Belgium, France, the Netherlands, Greece, Italy, Portugal, and Spain, and initial reports have also come in from Switzerland and Germany, albeit to a lesser degree. Possible cases of CCD have also been reported in Taiwan since April 2007.

NASA, Kids and the Environment:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2010-033&cid=release_2010-033&msource=a20100128&tr=y&auid=5868619

U.S. Forest Service Celebrating Wildflowers web page:

American Indian,Native American,youth,bee,bees,Marquette,Michigan,Upper Peninsula,Baraga,teens,teenagers,pollinators,pollen,pollinating,butterflies,butterfly,honeybees,bumblebees,environment,native plants,species extinction

Photobucket

Two Native American supporters of the Zaagkii Project, attending the July 2009 nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute Mid-Summer Festival at Presque Isle in Marquette, stand next to the beehive made by students with help from the director of the U.P. Childrens Museum. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Smoking Allowed:

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer
Being calmed by a smoker in the hands of beekeeper Dr. Jim Hayward, thousands of honeybees cling to the hive frame in June 2009 that is used by the bees to make honeycombs. (Photo by Erika Niebler)

Learning from a Master:

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Zaagkii Project students watch beekeeper Dr. Jim Hayward use a gripper to remove frames from the hives behind his home in Negaunee, MI during June 2009. (Photo by Erika Niebler)

Teen Beekeepers:

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Zaagkii Project volunteers Elliott Burdick (left), 17, a Marquette Senior High School (MSHS) senior and Taylor Dianich, 16, MSHS junior (right) stand next to honeybee hives in June 2009. (Photo by Erika Niebler)

2008 Zaagkii Projects Teens:

In July 2008 at the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute annual Mid-Summer Festival, Zaagkii Project teens told supporters what they were learning about pollinators and indigenous plants and wildflowers.

Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,2008,teens,teenagers,students,bees,butterflies,pollinators

During the first summer (2008) of the Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project, teens built, painted and handed out butterfly houses – that a slimmer and longer than bird houses with entries for butterflies with folded wings and a slab of bark for rest and reproduction. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Youth Protecting Pollinators:

Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,2008,teens,teenagers,students,bees,butterflies,pollinators

In July 2008 , Zaagkii Project teens and project founder Rev. Jon Magnuson tell supporters at the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute Mid-Summer Festival about what the students are doing during the first summer of the effort to protect pollinators. Magnuson is the executive director of the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute in Marquette, MI near Lake Superior. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Cooking on all Burners:

Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,2008,teens,teenagers,students,bees,butterflies,pollinators

Zaagkii Project teens help prepare the food at the annual Cedar Tree Institute Mid-Summer Festival during July 2008 in Marquette, MI.

During the first summer (2008) of the Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project, teens built, painted and handed out butterfly houses – that a slimmer and longer than bird houses with entries for butterflies with folded wings and a slab of bark for rest and reproduction.

Some of the students returned in 2009 to participate in the second summer of the Zaagkii Project during which mason bee houses were built, painted and distributed.
Both years the teens planted and distributed thousands of native species plants.

(Photo by Greg Peterson)

Like Shop Class:

Building Zaagkii Project houses 7/7/09

Building Zaagkii Project houses 7/7/09

Building Zaagkii Project houses 7/7/09

Zaagkii Project teens use a variety of tools to construct mason bee houses during the summer of 2009 in Marquette, MI with help from former shop teacher Bruce Ventura of Marquette
(Above photos by Greg Peterson)

Organic Farm Wildlife:

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer
Zaagkii Project teens check out a turkey at the Dancing Crane Farm in Skandia, MI where they helped with the native species plants. (Photo by Erika Niebler)

Organic Farms:

Learning importance of Native Species Plants to Pollinators …

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer
Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer
Zaagkii Project students work with native species plants in the summer of 2009 at the Dancing Crane Farm in Skandia, MI (above two photos) and at the Borealis Seed Company (below two photos) in Big bay, MI during the summer of 2009
(Photos by Erika Niebler)

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer
Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Native Species Plants:

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer
The organic Gather’n Greens Farm in Negaunee Township, MI was another opportunity for students to grow native species plants during summer of 2009
(Photo by Erika Niebler)

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer
Zaagkii Project teen Jacob Feliciano of Skandia, a Gwinn Middle School seventh grader, holds a kitten at the Dancing Crane Farm in Skandia, MI. The farm has lotds of exotic species of ildlife and the students learned respect for all of nature’s beings. (Photo by Erika Niebler)

Outstanding in Their Field:

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer
(Photo by Erika Niebler)

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer
Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer
Zaagkii Projects students including 13-year-old Tanya Nelson of ishpeming, MI making friends with a Turkey (above) and a goat (below) at the Dancing Crane Farm in Skanida, MI.
(Photos by Erika Niebler)

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer
Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Tea Time:

Herbal Tea from Native plants in northern Michigan …
Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer
During summer of 2009, Zaagkii Project teens learned how to make a variety of herbal teas using indigenous plants/herbs in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula
(Photo by Erika Niebler)

Food, Food Food:

Energizing the Zaagkii Project teens …
Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer
Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer
Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer
Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer
Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer
Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer
Zaagkii Project teens were always prepared a nutritional lunch while on many outings during the summer 2009. The teens learned that all the food they are would not be available if nbot for pollinators who make plants and veggies grow for salads and to provide feed for animals.
(Above photos courtesy Erika Niebler and Greg Peterson)

Youth, KBIC employees:

Learning how to respect the environment from Native American elders and youth …

Keweenaw Bay Indian Community,KBIC,tribal youth,youth,bees,butterflies,butterfly houses,bee,2008

Keweenaw Bay Indian Community,KBIC,tribal youth,youth,bees,butterflies,butterfly houses,bee,2008

Keweenaw Bay Indian Community,KBIC,tribal youth,youth,bees,butterflies,butterfly houses,bee,2008

Keweenaw Bay Indian Community,KBIC,tribal youth,youth,bees,butterflies,butterfly houses,bee,2008

Keweenaw Bay Indian Community,KBIC,tribal youth,youth,bees,butterflies,butterfly houses,bee,2008

Keweenaw Bay Indian Community,KBIC,tribal youth,youth,bees,butterflies,butterfly houses,bee,2008

(Photos by Greg Peterson)

The Zaagkii Project thanks KBIC official Todd Warner, Director of KBIC Natural Resource Department (NRD)

KBIC NRD employees help build butterfly houses in 2008

Those helping were tribal members Evelyn Ravindran, KBIC NRD Natural Resources Specialist; Katie Kruse, NRD Environment specialist; Char Beesley, Environment Specialist; Kit Laux, NRD Water Quality Specialist; and Kim Klopstein, one of the summer youth supervisors for the KBIC Summer Youth Program

For more info call 906-201-0020

KBIC Pow-wow:

Keweenaw Bay Indian Community,KBIC,tribal youth,youth,bees,butterflies,butterfly houses,bee,2008

Zaagkii Project students and the tribe’s summer youth were honored the 2008 Pow-wow at the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community in Baraga, MI. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Hearty Greens:

Big leafy greens not possible without pollinators …
Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer
Behind some gigantic heads of greens, Zaagkii students learned that nothing grows without pollinators
(Photo by Erika Niebler)

A Great Lake:

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer
Zaagkii Project teens were taught an appreciation for all natural things and enjoyed this respite during 2009 in the chilly summer waters of Lake Superior in Marquette, MI – the world’s largest freshwater lake.
(Photo by Erika Niebler)

Hanging in Nature:

(Next five photos by Erika Niebler)
Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer
Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer
(Above five photos by Erika Niebler)

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The Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis Fitzhugh (Miller) Reynolds,Mrs. Maxwell K. Reynolds,Jr.,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette founding father Peter White,Peter White,Joan (Reynolds) Miller,Don Miller,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Manoomin Project,bees,butterflies,wild rice,philanthropy,philanthropist,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation Inc.,Wells Fargo Bank
Joan Miller (above and below) with other Zaagkii Project supporters at the 2008 and 2009 CTI MidSummer festival. (Photos by Greg Peterson)
The Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis Fitzhugh (Miller) Reynolds,Mrs. Maxwell K. Reynolds,Jr.,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette founding father Peter White,Peter White,Joan (Reynolds) Miller,Don Miller,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Manoomin Project,bees,butterflies,wild rice,philanthropy,philanthropist,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation Inc.,Wells Fargo Bank

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[blip.tv ?posts_id=3251060&dest=40935]

USFS Success Story hails 2008-2010 Zaagkii Project
Posted by USFS on 2-02-2010

USFS Success Story on 2008 Zaagkii Project
Posted by USFS on 8-08-2008

American Indian,Native American,youth,bee,bees,Marquette,Michigan,Upper Peninsula,Baraga,teens,teenagers,pollinators,pollen,pollinating,butterflies,butterfly,honeybees,bumblebees,environment,native plants,species extinction

2010 Pollinator Week:

The Fourth Annual National Pollinator Week is June 21-27, 2010

American Indian,Native American,youth,bee,bees,Marquette,Michigan,Upper Peninsula,Baraga,teens,teenagers,pollinators,pollen,pollinating,butterflies,butterfly,honeybees,bumblebees,environment,native plants,species extinction

Photos by Erika Niebler and Greg Peterson

(Negaunee, Michigan) – Surrounded by a swarm of 150,000 loudly buzzing bees on a hot summer day, a group of Marquette County teens turned nervous faces and trepidation into smiles and a education that they heard loud and clear – to protect rather than fear pollinators.

At first only two teens wearing protective beekeeping gear entered the apiary behind the Negaunee township home of Jim and Martha Hayward. The others wearing only shorts and t-shirts soon approached when they discovered that honeybees are not aggressive.

Suited for Pollinators:

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Beekeeper Jim Hayward, a Marquette dentist, fits a protective suit on Zaagkii Project volunteer Elliott Burdick, 17, a Marquette Senior High School (MSHS) senior and Taylor Dianich, 16, MSHS junior (left behind Hayward), as the Zaagkii group of teens prepare to check out the honeybee hives on June 25, 2009 in the back yard of Hayward’s home in Negaunee Township, MI. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Bees and butterflies “are a part of the web of life because they pollinate all the flowers and fruit trees that provide us with food,” said Dr. Jim Hayward, a Marquette dentist who has four honeybee hives on a shaded hillside.

Plethora of Pollinators:

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Beekeeper Jim Hayward (right) of Negaunee Township, MI explains how to operate a smoker to Taylor Dianich, 16, a Marquette Senior High School (MSHS) junior (center) and Elliott Burdick (left), 17, MSHS senior on June 25, 2009. Hayward explained the smoker calms bees because they protect their honey by gorging themselves with it fearing there is a fire and they may need to flee with the valuable sticky gold to make a new nest. Zaagkii Project teens visited Hayward’s hives in 2008 and 2009. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

The teens literally got up close and personal with the honeybees by inspecting honeycomb trays each covered with about 3,000 busy bees and even handled a drone that Hayward explained do not have stingers like the rest of the colony and are easily identified by a larger round abdomen and bigger eyes.

“It doesn’t have a stinger? Are you positive?,” asked apprehensive teen Keith Gelsinger of Marquette.

The Queen’s Servant:

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Zaagkii Project teen volunteer Anatoly Nelson holds a honeybee drone, that doesn’t have a stinger and can’t even feed itself but has the vital duty of mating with the queen. The teens were amazed that drones can not sting. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

“I am positive,” Hayward said confidently while carefully handing the struggling drone to Gelsinger. “You can grab on to it – it won’t sting you.”

Honey Farming Dentist:

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Beekeeper and Marquette Dentist Dr. Jim Hayward has been hosting Zaagkii teens since the project began – giving the students a hands-on, up-close and personal experience with his 150,000 honeybees near Negaunee, MI.

Hayward and his wife Martha love the taste of honey and he says his beekeeping hobby has nothing to do with trying to keep youth from eating sugar and avoid dental problems – it’s a pleasant coincidence. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

In his soft-spoken, calm demeanor that relaxed the teens and the bees, Hayward said “you can stand a lot closer if you want, you won’t get stung.”

“The sole purpose of the drone is to mate with the queen. Otherwise it has no function. It can’t even feed itself. The other worker bees have to feed the drones.”

The teens let out an audible but soft gasp when Hayward pulled out a tray that was dripping with honey and packed with bees.

“Oooohh,” several of the astonished youths said at once.

Pointing to the edge of the honey-oozing tray in the bright sun, Hayward said “you can see the glistening of honey there.”

“It’s awesome,’ said 13-year-old eighth grader Tanya Nelson of Ishpeming. “Look at it, it’s honey, it’s dripping.”

Sweet Honey:

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Zaagkii Project volunteer 17-year-old Elliott Burdick of Marquette, MI inspects a honeycomb oozing with honey and covered with thousands of honeybees that is being held by veteran beekeeper Dr. Jim Hayward. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

The teens also visited a bee farm along the Dead River operated by Dr. Lisa Long and Lee Ossenheimer in Negaunee Township and heard from beekeeper Jon Kniskern of Marquette.

Beekeeper Jon Kniskern:

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Zaagkii Project teens learned about honeybees from three northern Michigan beekeepers including Jon Kniskern of Marquette who brought hive frames and other tools of the trade like a smoker to his session with the students next to the peaceful Marquette Lower Harbor on Lake Superior in the summer of 2009.

The teens also visited the beekeeping operations of beekepers Jim Hayward and Lee Ossenheimer of Gather’n Greens. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

The Zaagkii Project is sponsored by the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute (CTI), Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC) and the United States Forest Service (USFS).

We are Family:

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

Dozens of northern Michigan teens have participated in the Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project (Photos by Greg Peterson)

2008 Zaagkii Projects Teens:

In July 2008 at the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute annual Mid-Summer Festival, Zaagkii Project teens told supporters what they were learning about pollinators and indigenous plants and wildflowers.

Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,2008,teens,teenagers,students,bees,butterflies,pollinators

Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,2008,teens,teenagers,students,bees,butterflies,pollinators

During the first summer (2008) of the Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project, teens built, painted and handed out butterfly houses – that a slimmer and longer than bird houses with entries for butterflies with folded wings and a slab of bark for rest and reproduction.
Some of the students returned in 2009 to participate in the second summer of the Zaagkii Project during which mason bee houses were built, painted and distributed.
Both years the teens planted and distributed thousands of native species plants.
(Photos by Greg Peterson)

Teen Anatoly Nelson was impressed that he was able to stand in the huge swarm and not get stung.

“Holy cow, that’s a lot of bees,” said Nelson, who also handled a honeybee drone that doesn’t have a stinger.

Getting a Grip:

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Beekeeper Jim Hayward of Negaunee, MI uses a gripper to show one of the honeycomb trays to Zaagkii teens during a June 25, 2009 visit by Zaagkii Project members. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Student Anatoly Nelson also stood in a thick warm of bees and watched with amazement as they buzzed around his body and even bumped him without stinging or becoming alarmed.

Unbee-lievable Buzz:

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Anatoly Nelson (left) calmly freezes, and can’t help smiling, as a swarm of honeybees bounced off his body but were not upset by his presence at the Hayward apiary. Watching are 16-year old Jake Gentz (center), a Marquette Senior High School senior; and Jim Rule (right), a child care counselor at Marquette County Youth Home. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Honeybees often have “sacks of yellow or orange pollen on its legs,” Hayward said. “They are busy bringing their nectar and pollen back to the hive.”

“You can learn a lot about the health of the hive by just looking at the flow of the bees coming in and out of the hive,” Hayward said as the heavy bees bounced in for landings.

Golden Combs:

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Beekeeper Jim Hayward (left) holds a tray with thousands of honey bees as Zaagkii Project eighth grader Tanya Nelson (second from left), 13, of Ishpeming, MI watches in amazement along with Cedar Tree Institute volunteer Amanda Emerson (second from right) of Cary, Ill., the 21-year-old event coordinator for the Northern Michigan University (NMU) Student Team and an NMU Senior Majoring in International Studies (emphasis on Latin America) and Earth Science (emphasis on rocks and minerals). Making a point is Zaagkii Project volunteer Tom Reed (right) of Marquette, who has a bachelors degree in social work and has worked on several Cedar Tree Institute environment projects. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

In its second summer, the three-year Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project protects pollinators through habitat creation that includes teenagers constructing dozens of bee and butterfly houses while helping native plants flourish by distributing and planting tens of thousands indigenous seeds.

Billions of bees of have died worldwide in an ongoing syndrome dubbed Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD). Suspected causes for CCD include pollution, pesticides, climate change and habitat destruction.

Bees have always been killed by a wide-range of predators.

Natural bee killers include black bears that raid hives for honey, bald-faced hornets who kill the queen and feast on the colony, birds that pick them off in mid-air and skunks who scratch on the hive with an insatiable taste for guard bees.

Zaagkii Project Teens:

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Zaagkii Project teens at the Dancing Crane Farm in Skandia, MI in the summer of 2009 (Photo by Erika Niebler)

Feral and commercial hives are attacked by viruses, bacteria and parasites like a tracheal mite that infests honeybee airways and blood-sucking mites that infect and feed on adult and larval bees causing wings deformities.

Pollinator Pleasure:

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Beekeeper Jim Hayward explains the difference in the appearance of members of the honeybee family like worker bees and drones as Zaagkii Project volunteer Keith Gelsinger of Marquette, MI smiles. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Hayward uses electric fences to protect bees from persistent bears and elevates hives on cinder blocks to discourage skunks.

“That makes the skunks have to stand up, so their bellies are exposed and the bees can sting them more easily,” Hayward said.

Experts say bee colonies have declined 70 to 90 percent in the past quarter century. Albert Einstein predicted humans would die within four years if bees disappeared.

“People get into beekeeping is to sell their pollination services to orchards around the country” including “apple and cherry orchards in Michigan,” Hayward said.

Youthful Green Thumbs:

Joining Forces: The force of Mother Nature’s Native Species Plants and the powerful hungry for knowledge Zaagkii Project teens are unstoppable….

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Zaagkii Project students work in one of the vast fields with native species plants in the summer of 2009 at the Dancing Crane Farm in Skandia, MI (Photo by Erika Niebler)

“I got into raising bees after local bee populations died out because of some disease and we did not have anything to pollinate” our fruits and vegetables, Hayward said.

Bodacious Honeybees:

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About 3,000 honeybees cling to every tray that all ooze with honey at the apiary run by beekeeper Dr. Jim Hayward in Negaunee, MI. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

The teens learned about beekeeper tools like honeycomb trays, frame grippers, a hive tool and a bee brush.

“You can brush them off an area with this gentle brush and it won’t damage the bees,” Hayward said.

Happy and Unafraid:

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(Photo by Greg Peterson)

While reassuring the teens that “honeybees tend to be docile,” Hayward donned himself and two youths in protective gear including a bee veil and gloves.

“If I make a false step and jar the hive or move to quickly it keeps me from being stung,” he said. “Honeybees die if they sting you, so they are not anxious to sting unless they are protecting themselves or the hive.”

Nature’s Best Friends:

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Zaagkii Project teens gather along the edges of the apiary in Negaunee, MI that has numerous honeybee hives while listening to Dr. Jim Hayward’s honeybee facts. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

“The queen excluder keeps the queen from getting up into the honey chambers and laying eggs so you don’t get larval bees into the honey,” he said. “These two chambers are the brood chambers, where the hive raises its new bees.”

During the summer, the queen “lays close to a thousand eggs a day,” Hayward said. “It takes 21 days for a bee to develop.”

Smoking Sumac:

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Zaagkii Project tens learned several uses for bitter dried sumac, a plant indigenous to northern Michigan, including making a lemonade-flavored tea and for use in a bee smoker. Beekeeper Jim Hayward (left) demonstrates how to light the dried sumac to Zaagkii Project volunteer Elliott Burdick (center), 17, a Marquette Senior High School (MSHS) senior and Taylor Dianich, 16, MSHS junior (right). (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Using a smoker that burns dried sumac, Hayward said the smoke “simulates a forest fire” triggering a protective instinct that causes the bees “to gorge themselves with honey in preparation for leaving the hive.”

2009 Zaagkii Project Teens:

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Zaagkii Project teens learned respect for nature and themselves during the summer of 2009. (Photo by Erika Niebler)

Hayward explained that the bitter sumac burning in his bee smoker makes a great tea that tastes like lemon.

Later the teens made sumac iced tea, add a drop of Hayward’s honey and served it to Zaagkii Project supporters at the annual CTI Midsummer Festival at Presque Isle in Marquette. The youths made other natural hors d’oeuvres like honey and wild mint in a tiny appetizer cup.

Lake Superior Safe Harbor:

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Sitting on the Dock of the Bay with Zaagkii Students:

Marquette teens listen to Zaagkii Project founder Rev. Jon Magnuson while sitting on the edge of a bike path that parallels the Marquette Upper Harbor next the the old iron ore docks once used by giant ships to haul ore to steels mills on the lower Great Lakes – ships like the Edmund Fitzgerald (Photos by Erika Niebler)

The smoker causes the bees to quickly consume honey for possible transport to a new hive and the honey relaxes the bees so they won’t sting while being handled.

“When they are gorged with honey they are more docile,” he said. “The key is moving slowly and trying to be a gentle as you can be – so the bees don’t get too excited.”

Zaagkii Coverup:

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Nettin’ to be Afraid of:

Dr. Jim Hayward adjusts a protective bee net and hat worn by Zaagkii Project volunteers (Photo by Greg Peterson)

“Drones develop from unfertilized eggs, worker bees are developed from fertilized eggs,” Hayward said.

“If they need to make a queen they take worker larva and feed it a special extract from their heads called Royal Jelly and that larva grows into a queen instead of a worker.”

Check it out:

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Zaagkii Project teens visit Gather’n Greens on June 24, 2009, a bee farm along the Dead River operated by Dr. Lisa Long and Lee Ossenheimer in Negaunee Township, MI.

Their seven-year-old son, Jesse Ossenheimer, is pictured showing Zaagkii project students some of the frames used by bees to produce honey. The couple also grow mushrooms.

Zaagkii Project teens went swimming in Dead River Basin after tasting honey and visiting with beekeeper Lee Ossenheimer. It’s a family affair as the couple’s children taught the students about the art of beekeeping. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Exact Extracting:

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Beekeeper Lee Ossenheimer of Negaune Township, MI and his seven-year-old son, Jesse Ossenheimer show Zaagkii Project teens the honey extractor that spins and uses centrifugal force to remove the honey from the frames on honeycombs. Ossenheimer and his wife Dr. Lisa Long, own an organic farm that includes a beekeeping, mushroom and vegetable seedling business named Gather’n Greens in Negaunee Township, MI. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Future Beekeeper:

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Seven-year-old Jesse Ossenheimer shows a honeycomb frame to Zaagkii Project volunteer Taylor Dianich, 16, a MSHS Junior. Jesse has learned a lot about his parents beekeeping operations at their business Gather’n Greens in Negaunee, Township, MI. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

The teens likely have “never been that close to a bee hive before,” said Jim Rule, a child care counselor at Marquette County Youth Home.

“Even the kids that did not have any protective gear were right up close too,” Rule said. “I was amazed at how brave they were.”

Yummy Tummy Honey:

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Above, Zaagkii Projects teens Anatoly Nelson (second from right) and Brandon Maki (right) enjoy fresh honey provided by beekeeper Dr. Lisa Long (left) in Negaunee Township, MI. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Sticky Licking:

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Zaagkii Project eighth grader Tanya Nelson (left), 13, of Ishpeming, MI uses a fork to enjoy the fresh honey provided by Dr. Lisa Long. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Honey Heaven:

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Hayward Honey:

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

Beekeeper Dr. Jim Hayward speaks in July 2009 to Zaagkii Project supporters at the annual Mid-Summer Festival hosted by the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute in the pavilion on Marquette’s Presque Isle that’s surrounded on three sides by Lake Superior. (Photos by Greg Peterson)

Gather’n Greens:

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Holding his three-year-old son Alex Ossenheimer, beekeeper Lee Ossenheimer of Negaune Township, MI talks with Zaagkii Project teens on June 24, 2009 before taking them on a tour of his apiary and mushroom growing operations named Gather’n Greens. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Sunny Honeycomb:

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Zaagkii Project teen Devon Myers checks out the sunlit honeycomb frames used by beekeepers and their bees to create honey. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Pass the Comb:

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Zaagkii Project eighth grader Tanya Nelson (left), 13, of Ishpeming, MI holds a frame used by beekeepers to have bees create honeycombs. Below, teen Brandon Maki sniffs the wax smell of the honeycomb tray after the honey is removed. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

PhotobucketThe teens sniffed honeycomb trays and checked them out using the sun. Honeycombs trays have a unique, waxy smell that the teens will always remember (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Mother of Monarchs:

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

“The Butterfly Lady” Susan Payant of Marquette reads a short story about Monarchs entitled: “Waiting for Wings” by author/poet Lois Ehlert in July 2009 at the annual nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute Mi-Summer Festival in Marquette. (Photos by Greg Peterson)

For a second year, Susan Payant of Marquette, nicknamed “The Butterfly Lady,” taught Zaagkii Project teens about the importance of Monarch butterflies and native plants.

At the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute 2009 Mid-Summer Festival at Presque Isle Pavilion in Marquette during July, Payant reads a childrens short story/poem entitled: “Waiting for Wings” by Lois Ehlert, author, poet, designer, illustrator.

The Butterfly Lady:

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For the second year, Susan Payant of Marquette taught Zaagkii Project teens about Monarchs and other butterflies and why they are second only to bees when it comes to pollination.

The popular, pleasant and passionate Payant is well-known around northern Michigan and is lovingly called “The Butterfly Lady” because of her love for butterflies and their life-cycle. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

Hundreds of thousands of Monarchs pass through the U.P. each year enroute to a famous gathering spot in Mexico where millions of Monarchs converge from across the world.

The teens visited Laughing White Fish Falls in Alger County, the organic Dancing Crane Farm run by Natasha and David Gill in Skandia, and planted native species plants at the Borealis Seed Company owned by Sue Rabitaille in Big Bay.

Meeting three days a week for five weeks, the teens walked dozens of miles during numerous hikes, climbed Sugar Loaf, and swam in Lake Superior and the Dead River.

Cedar Tree Fans:

American Indian,Native American,youth,bee,bees,Marquette,Michigan,Upper Peninsula,Baraga,teens,teenagers,pollinators,pollen,pollinating,butterflies,butterfly,honeybees,bumblebees,environment,native plants,species extinction

Zaagkii Project supporters enjoy themselves at the July 2009 Mid-Summer Festival in the pavilion at Presque Isle in Marquette. (Photos by Greg Peterson)

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The teens built a huge beehive with help from Jim Edwards at the U.P. Children’s Museum, who created a large butterfly for the Zaagkii Project in 2008.

Using hoops, spray paint, and other tricks, Edwards showed the teens that many things can be built out of everyday products including the beehive, bees and the butterfly. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Rockin’ Rick:

Soothing Thai Chi from expert Rick Pietila is sought by famous bands for his techie expertise:

Rick Pietila does Tai Chi July 2009

Relaxation techniques like Tai Chi are now part of the Zaagkii teens repertoire thanks to martial artist Rick Pietila of Marquette, MI who gave several demonstrations including Tai Chi fundamentals. (Above Photo by Greg Peterson)

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The students learned Tai Chi along the calming Lower Harbor in Marquette, MI with a fresh Lake Superior breeze an important part of the June 23, 2009 experience.

Rick Pietila’s other ongoing amazing adventures include traveling with several legendary Rock and Roll groups including being a guitar tech for the band Boston and traveled into South America with the band Stryper and has been a road techie for many other iconic bands. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

Native Senses:

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The students learned about different species of native plants and insects during several outings with an Ojibwa brother and sister – Levi and Leora Tadgerson – who are Zaagkii Project interns from the NMU Department of Native American Studies. (Above and below photos by Greg Peterson)

The students learned “different uses the Ojibwa had for edible and medicinal plants” like “the saps of different trees and the roots,” said Levi Tadgerson, 22, of Marquette, an NMU senior.

“We explained this plant is good for keeping bugs away from you and this plant is good for a breath mint,” Tadgerson said.

Native American Heritage

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The Tadgersons were impressed with the teens’ ability to grasp Chippewa language because “we would tell them the different native names for plants and two days later they would remember it,” said Leora Tadgerson of Negaunee.

“I think the earth is suffering,” she said. “Indicator plants like wild rice that don’t grow as much anymore because of the way we have abused the earth.”

Heritage and Culture:

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Zaagkii Project instructors Levi Tadgerson and Leora Tadgerson of Negaunee, MI are interns from the Northern Michigan University center for Native American Studies in Marquette. Leora is pictured teaching the teens how to recognized various plants indigenous to the central Upper Peninsula of Michigan near Lake Superior. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

The pair taught the teens to seek a “symbiotic relationship” with the earth because “nowadays we are more of a parasite to the planet,” Levi Tadgerson said. “We need to respect the gift we have been given by Mother Earth.”

The Anishinaabemowin Way

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Northern Michigan University Center for Native American Studies Anishinaabemowin Professor Kenneth Pitawanakwat explained why and how Native Americans show respect for the earth and then led the closing prayer at the CTI Mid-Summer Festival in July 2009. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

“There are ways to heal by just getting into the woods and learning knowledge from elders,” he said. “There are gifts and teachings every day that you will get from the earth.”

Both passed on respect for the earth inherited from elders and knowledge about native plants learned from NMU Anishinaabemowin Professor Kenneth Pitawanakwat, who offered the closing prayer at the CTI midsummer festival.

“We greet each day and end each day with a thank you prayer,” Pitawanakwat said.

“In Native America, all events begin and end with prayer. It’s a spiritual component that’s all done with prayer. There is no such thing as a separation of church and state.”

Martial arts training and Tai Chi lessons, techniques for relaxation, were given to the teens by Rick Pietila of Marquette. They performed their new talents art at the CTI Mid-Summer Festival in Marquette.

Noting a Tai Chi performance by the Zaagkii Project teens, Pitawanakwat said:

“The sounds from the soft fluttering moves of Tai Chi were very beneficial to all of us.”

Nature Moves:

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

Zaagkii Project instructor Rick Pietila of Marquette taught the teens many relaxation techniques including Tai Chi that the group performed at the Cedar Tree Institute 2009 Mid-Summer Festival. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Turning to the band, Terracotta half-life (pictured below) of Marquette, Pitawanakwat said “megwich for your inspirational songs.”

Live with Terracotta half-life

Scroll down to credits to learn more about Terracotta half-life.

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

A few weeks earlier, the sounds of hammers and saws filled the Grace United Methodist Church in Marquette for several days as the teens built and painted 36 mason bee houses with help from carpenter/retired teacher Bruce Ventura and artist Diana Magnuson, both of Marquette.

In 2008, other Zaagkii Project teens built and painted 17 butterfly houses at the church.

Carpentry skills:

Building Zaagkii Project houses 7/7/09

Former school teacher Bruce Ventura (pictured in above collage) of Marquette taught the Zaagkii Project students to build mason bee houses during the summer of 2009 at the Grace United Methodist Church in Marquette.

(Photos by Greg Peterson)

Mason Bee Houses:

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Shaped like a birdhouse, the mason bee houses have five pieces of wood below the roof with 33 holes that are each turned into a private nursery. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Creative Teens:

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Zaagkii Project students paint the mason bee houses on July 8, 2009 that they built a few days earlier at the Grace United Methodist Church in Marquette, MI. (Photos by Greg Peterson)

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Mason bees “are very particular” and “want a five-sixteenths inch diameter hole,” Ventura said. “If the holes are too large other insects get into them, and if the holes are too small the mason bees can’t get in.”

After laying a single egg into each hole, the mason bees “deposit some pollen and mud that hole closed hence the name mason bee,” Ventura said.

Mason Bee Motivation

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Zaagkii Project students paint the mason bee houses on July 8, 2009 that they built a few days earlier at the Grace United Methodist Church in Marquette, MI. (Photos by Greg Peterson)

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Mason bees “make these holes three to six inches deep depending on the size of the tree,” he said. “Mason bees are solitary bees, they’re not colonial like honey bees.”

While mason bees do not make honey, Ventura said “they’re great pollinators like honeybees.”

Ventura is impressed with the teen’s carpentry and artistic skills.

“The young people are terrific,” he said. “They did a great job putting the mason bee houses together and decorating. They did a lot of sawing and nailing and screwed in the tops.”

Lessons on protecting pollinators was not lost on the Zaagkii Project teens.

“I learned that there are 4,000 different species of bees,” Bobbie Weymouth, 14, of Beaver Grove told project supporters at the CTI Midsummer Festival.

Earlier, Weymouth explained what he’d learned about mason bees as he nailed and sanded mason bee houses.

“The bees are going to put pollen it these holes and put mud in and then they hatch an egg,” said Weymouth, whose brother Daniel participated in the Manoomin Project, a CTI environment initiative that paired Marquette teens with Native American elders to restore wild rice to seven remote rivers and lakes across the U.P.

While screwing on a mason bee house roof and sanding the edges, Elliott Burdick, 17, of Marquette said “pollinators are important to all life on earth because they pollinate all the fruits and vegetables we eat.”

“I am screwing in the roof to the base of the bees houses right now,” Burdick said. “Then I am sanding it down so the edges are not sharp and making it all flush. The mason bees will be going inside these holes.”

Looking Sharp:

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Artistic Appreciation:

Zaagkii Project,teens,illustrator Diana Magnuson,Diana Magnuson,Sherri Bohjanen-Hutter,Anchorage,Alaska,painting,mason bee houses,Grace United Methodist Church,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project

Zaagkii Project teens gave presents to children’s book illustrator Diana Magnuson (center) of Marquette and artist Sherri Bohjanen-Hutter (right), a Marquette native from Anchorage, Alaska. The artists helped the Zaagkii teens learned about different kids of paint and techniques as they used colorful designs on their mason bee houses. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Zaagkii Project founder Rev. Jon Magnuson talks to Cedar Tree Institute supporters in July 2009 as the Zaagkii students cook on the pavilion grill on Presque Isle in Marquette, MI at the annual CTI Mid-Summer Festival. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

A Good Sign:

Building Zaagkii Project houses 7/7/09

Zaagkii Project teens hold signs about the pollinator initiative during a summer 2009 group discussion on protecting pollinators.
(Photo by Greg Peterson)

The students learned that butterflies are just as important pollinators as bees.

“I learned that Monarch butterflies only eat and lay their eggs on milkweed,” said Jake Gentz, 16, who will be a senior this fall at Marquette Senior High Schools

Student Brandon Maki of Marquette said he “learned we can make natural teas out of spruce trees and pine trees.”

The mason bee houses are now in yards across Marquette County. The mason bee houses and last summer’s butterfly houses were put up around the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community and one of each were placed by the USFS in the “The People’s Garden” at U.S. Department of Agriculture Headquarters on the National Mall in Washington D.C.

Teen Devon Myers of Marquette told Zaagkii Project supporters at the CTI Midsummer Festival that the students “made 36 mason bee houses and we are giving some of them away tonight.”

USFS officials said the Zaagkii Project is effectively spreading the word about the importance of native plants and the teen mason bee and butterfly houses have a positive impact on the survival of pollinators.

The U.S. Forest Service (USFS):

The USFS is part of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

U.S. Forest Service official Jan Schultz gives an update on the Zaagkii Project and the forest service extensive efforts to protect pollinators and promote native species plants in July 2008 at the annual Cedar Tree Institute Summer Festival in Marquette, MI. Schultz is the USFS botany and non-native species program leader in Milwaukee, WI. (Photos by Greg Peterson)

“In point of fact, the mason bee houses are very useful,” said Jan Schultz, USFS botany and non-native species program leader in Milwaukee, WI. “The mason bee houses are used by mason bees and other types of solitary bees. They really like them and they will have customers.”

“The insect pollinators in North America evolved with indigenous plants and so they are really well-suited to pollinate them,” Schultz said after watching the teens make the houses in Marquette.

Schultz said that “native plants and the native insects that pollinate them represent a symbiotic relationship” and cannot survive without each other.

Native Species Plants:

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Zaagkii Project teams spent hours and hours in the deep northwoods learning about native species plants including learning about the different benefits of the plants such as medicinal from Native American teachings thanks to NMU Center for Native American Studies Zaagkii project interns Leora and Levi Tadgerson. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

“In some instances they have a mutualistic relationship, where they are pollinated by one insect and one plant species, so it can be really specific,” she said.

Vegetable and flower garden production increases when “native plants are in close proximity,” she said, “because the pollinators that people want to pollinate their squash or tomatoes need to have food all summer long.”

Life-Giving Water:

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The importance of northern Michigan’s vast water resources to the health and vitality of indigenous plants, pollinators and humans was absorbed by Zaagkii Project teens who also took the time to swim and relax in frigid but pristine Lake Superior and several rivers/streams in Marquette and Alger counties in the summers of 2008 and 2009 (Photos by Erika Niebler)

Pollinators “are not going to magically appear in front of a tomato flower at an appropriate time,” Schultz said. “So planting with native plants in proximity to their garden makes for a much more productive garden and more produce.”

“Milkweeds and monarchs are a stunning example ,” she said. “The monarch larva prefer to eat various milkweed species.”

“The more of the milkweed that monarchs eat, the less palatable they are to predators because apparently they taste really horrible,” Schultz said. “So that’s beneficial to the monarch butterfly and they also pollinate the milkweed flower.”

Protecting Pollinators:

Working Together: Native Americans, non-natives, young and old, teens and college students …

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

During the CTI Midsummer festival, KBIC Tribal President Chris Swartz Jr. (bottom left photo in collage) announced the building of a native plants greenhouse that scheduled to be built in 2010 on tribal property near Baraga. (Photos by Greg Peterson)

Native Understanding:

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

In 2010, the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community will build the first native species plants greenhouse on a Native American reservation that will be similar to the Hiawatha National Forest Greenhouse (Upper left photo in collage) in Marquette, MI.

Zaagkii students (upper right photo) plants seeds in the summer of 2008 and have have planted/distributed tens of thousands of native species plants and seeds.

The plants were later planted along the KBIC Sand Point beach in Baraga County that was once polluted by copper mining operations. Two photos on bottom right show the Sand Point beach after the copper tailings were covered and before the native plants were planted.

Cedar Tree Institute/Zaagkii project organizers meet with officials with the KBIC Natural Resource Department (bottom middle photo) in the summer of 2008 to plan the Sand Point native plants project. (Photos by Greg Peterson)

KBIC “is happy to be partnering with the Cedar Tree Institute and the U.S. Forest Service in trying to protect native plants and bring them back home,” Swartz said.

“One day we hope (KBIC) will be regarded as pioneers to bring these native plants back here,” he said. “So it’s only fitting that the (KBIC) become involved in helping save those native plants.”

A History of Cooperation:

The Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC), the United States Forest Service (USFS) and the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute in Marquette, MI

American Indian,Native American,youth,bee,bees,Marquette,Michigan,Upper Peninsula,Baraga,teens,teenagers,pollinators,pollen,pollinating,butterflies,butterfly,honeybees,bumblebees,environment,native plants,species extinction

Hiawatha National Forest Greenhouse:

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Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Using spades, wheelbarrows and gardener’s gloves, Zaagkii Project teens planted/distributed tens of thousands of native species plant seeds and harvested seedlings at the Hiawatha National Forest Greenhouse in Marquette, MI. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

“We have been working with the Cedar Tree Institute for a number of years and they are great to work with,” said Swartz, noting the Manoomin Project to restore wild rice and native plants restoration project at the KBIC Sand Point beach on Lake Superior.

Honoring Mother Earth:

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

Teaching respect for Native American culture and the planet are goals the CTI plans to continue for another decade, CTI officials said during the festival.

Zaagkii HeadshotsNonprofit Cedar Tree Institute board member Steve Mattson speaks to supports in July 2009 at the annual CTI Mid-Summer Festival in Marquette, MI

(Photo By Greg Peterson)

“We honor the presence of the Native Americans,” said Marquette banker and CTI board member Steve Mattson.

“It’s tremendous that the (KBIC) have shown the leadership and the vision to have the first greenhouse for native species plants in the U.S. on their native land,” Mattson said.

Working “behind the scenes,” the CTI will continue efforts like the Zaagkii and Manoomin projects because “they are important,” Mattson said.

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

Philanthropic Mattson Family:

Steve Mattson and his family (and friends) have a long history of supporting the Upper Peninsula business community, nonprofit initiatives and people …

“We’re the quiet people and we like to keep it that way”

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

“We’re the quiet people and we like to keep it that way,” Mattson said. “We like to do big things and we can only do big things through each of you.”

The Zaagkii Project contributors include the Marquette Community Foundation, Marquette County Juvenile Court, the M.E. Davenport Foundation, the Kaufman Foundation and the Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation.

Peter White Library :

Pollinating the Minds of our Youth about the importance of bees, butterflies and other pollinators

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Zaagkii Project teens visited the Peter White Public Library in Marquette, MI during the summer of 2009to learn facts about pollinators, native species plants and the effect of both on the food they eat. The teens learned about the various species of indigenous plants in northern Michigan and Midwest – and spread their knowledge to others including the fact that pollinators are keystone to the survival of all life on this planet because the service provided by bees, butterflies and other pollinators are the reason plants, trees, vegetables and fruit grow – and that food is vital to all forms of life. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

Native Plants Northern Light:

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The Borealis Seed Company in Big Bay, MI literally brought Zaagkii Projects students to their knees as the teens helped the owners manage the operation that specializes in native species plants and seeds.
Borealis Seed Company is run by the mother-daughter team of Judy Keast and Suzanne Rabitaille on a 20-acre spread three miles south of Big Bay of which about 5 acres is cultivated. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

Organic Farm:

Turkeys, Goats, Pigs …

Butterflies, Bees, Cranes and Things…

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The Zaagkii students were amazed by all the animals that roam the organic Dancing Crane Farm run by Natasha and David Gill, who understand the importance of protecting pollinators.

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With a plethora of wildlife, Dancing Crane Farm in Skandia, MI has naturally grown and raised vegetables, flowers and more on 20 acres with almost five acres cultivated. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

Zaagkii Project Fellowship:

Teens, college students and older adults …

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When they were not building butterfly houses, mason bee houses and distributing/planting native species plants, the Zaagkii Project students had time to become friends, reflect on their work and enhance social skills during lunches, outdoor bar-b-ques and other time for bonding and fun. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

Nature Naturally:

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Zaagkii project teens have learned a deep appreciation for nature during their many hours spent in the majestic northwoods of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula along breath-taking waterfalls and winding streams with the pungent smell of pollination and bees wafting through the warm air. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

Healthy Lunch thanks to Pollinators:

healthy lunch,lettuce,salad,tomato,cucumber,greens,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Zaagkii Project

Zaagkii Project Northern Michigan University volunteer and student leader Erika Niebler prepared healthy lunches for the students including a large salad in July 2009.
The Zaagkii Project students said their salad with a wide variety of veggies would not have been possible without pollinators to make the lettuce, tomatoes, and other vegetables grow. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Transplanting Native Species:

Herbs/Veggies/Mushrooms …

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Getting their hands in the soil at At Gather’n Greens in Negaunee Township, MI, Zaagkii Project students learned about organic vegetables, indigenous herbs – and the transplanting of veggie and herb seedlings. Beekeeper Lee Ossenheimer and wife Dr. Lisa Long own the organic farm Gather’n Greens along the Dead River in northern Michigan. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

Organic Mushrooms:

Zaagkii Project teens learned about the challenges of growing mushrooms during the chilly, windy and rainy “summer that wasn’t” in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula along a Lake Superior tributary.

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An organic Mushroom growing operation is part of Gather’n Greens, an organic farm near Negaunee, MI owned by Lee Ossenheimer and wife Dr. Lisa Long.

The students learned that the mushrooms are grown by drilling holes in logs that are filled with mushroom spawn. (Photos by Erika Niebler)

American Indian,Native American,youth,bee,bees,Marquette,Michigan,Upper Peninsula,Baraga,teens,teenagers,pollinators,pollen,pollinating,butterflies,butterfly,honeybees,bumblebees,environment,native plants,species extinction

Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project Contacts, Supporters and Related Links:

USFS Success Story hails 2008-2010 Zaagkii Project
Posted 2-02-2010

USFS Success Story on 2008 Zaagkii Project
Posted 8-08-2008

U.S. Forest Service logo/banner

Larry Stritch, USFS National Botanist
Larry Stritch
National Botanist USDA U.S. Forest Service
1400 Independence Ave., SW
Mail stop 1103
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

1-202-205-1279 (Office)

email USFS National Botanist Larry Stritch

Larry Stritch honored for USFS Celebrating Wildflowers website

Above Photo of Larry Stritch from the Arizona Native Plant Society publication entitled “The Plant Press

American Indian,Native American,youth,bee,bees,Marquette,Michigan,Upper Peninsula,Baraga,teens,teenagers,pollinators,pollen,pollinating,butterflies,butterfly,honeybees,bumblebees,environment,native plants,species extinction

USFS wildflowers page

Wildflowers in the Eastern Region

American Indian,Native American,youth,bee,bees,Marquette,Michigan,Upper Peninsula,Baraga,teens,teenagers,pollinators,pollen,pollinating,butterflies,butterfly,honeybees,bumblebees,environment,native plants,species extinction

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Jan Schultz, USFS

Botany, Non-native Invasive Species

Special Forest Products Program Leader

USDA Forest Service Eastern Region

626 Wisconsin Avenue, 7th Floor

Milwaukee, WI

53203

1-414-297-1189 (wk)

1-414-944-3963 (fax)

Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Jan Schultz,United States Forest Service,USFS,Milwaukee,wildflowers,bees,butterflies Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Jan Schultz,United States Forest Service,USFS,Milwaukee,wildflowers,bees,butterflies Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Jan Schultz,United States Forest Service,USFS,Milwaukee,wildflowers,bees,butterflies Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Jan Schultz,United States Forest Service,USFS,Milwaukee,wildflowers,bees,butterflies Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Jan Schultz,United States Forest Service,USFS,Milwaukee,wildflowers,bees,butterflies Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Jan Schultz,United States Forest Service,USFS,Milwaukee,wildflowers,bees,butterflies Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Presque Isle,April Lindala,Jan Schukltz,kids,USFS,United States Forest Service,NMU,Northern Michigan University Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Presque Isle,April Lindala,Jan Schukltz,kids,USFS,United States Forest Service,NMU,Northern Michigan University Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Presque Isle,April Lindala,Jan Schukltz,kids,USFS,United States Forest Service,NMU,Northern Michigan University Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Presque Isle,April Lindala,Jan Schukltz,kids,USFS,United States Forest Service,NMU,Northern Michigan University Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Presque Isle,April Lindala,Jan Schukltz,kids,USFS,United States Forest Service,NMU,Northern Michigan University Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Presque Isle,April Lindala,Jan Schukltz,kids,USFS,United States Forest Service,NMU,Northern Michigan University

email Jan Schultz

USFS links and information page about plants, botany, the Zaagkii Project and other efforts to protect pollinators and the importance of native species plants


Cedar Tree Institute,Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute,Rev. Jon Magnuson,Spirit of Place,Los Alamos,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,EarthKeepers,Upper Peninsula Earth Keepers,U.P. EarthKeepers,Interfaith Earth Healing Initiative,Earth Healing Initiative,nonprofit,Marquette,Michigan,Environment,ethics,counseling,Lutheran,pastor,reverendZaagkii Headshots Photobucket Photobucket Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Presque Isle,April Lindala,Jan Schukltz,kids,USFS,United States Forest Service,NMU,Northern Michigan University Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Presque Isle,April Lindala,Jan Schukltz,kids,USFS,United States Forest Service,NMU,Northern Michigan University Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Presque Isle,April Lindala,Jan Schukltz,kids,USFS,United States Forest Service,NMU,Northern Michigan University Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket

Rev. Jon Magnuson

Founder of the three-year (2008-2010) Zaagkii Project

Executive Director of the Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute

402 E. Michigan St.

Marquette, MI

49855

email Rev. Jon Magnuson

906-228-5494 (hm)

906-360-5072 (cell)

Cedar Tree Institute (CTI) Winter 2009 Newsletter

Photobucket Zaagkii Project,teens,illustrator Diana Magnuson,Diana Magnuson,Sherri Bohjanen-Hutter,Anchorage,Alaska,painting,mason bee houses,Grace United Methodist Church,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project

Illustrator Diana Magnuson

Diana Magnuson biography
email Diana Magnuson

Kids Book website on illustrator Diana Magnuson of Marquette, MI

——-

NMU Students Leaders and volunteers for the Cedar Tree Institute and the Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project:

Zaagkii Headshots healthy lunch,salad,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,lettuce,tomato,cucumber,bread,teenagers,teenager,students

Photobucket Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Erika Niebler

Erika is a Northern Michigan University (NMU) student and volunteers for numerous Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute initiatives including the Zaagkii Project, Zaagkii Project photographer, NMU Lutheran Campus Ministry student leader and photographer

1-763-670-0611

2008 Zaagkii Project pixs with Sarah Swanson 2008 Zaagkii Project pixs with Sarah Swanson 2008 Zaagkii Project pixs with Sarah Swanson and Diana Magnuson Photobucket 2008 Zaagkii Project pixs with Sarah Swanson

Sarah Swanson

Sarah is a NMU student leader, volunteers for numerous nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute Projects including the Zaagkii Project, Northern Michigan University (NMU) Student leader, Lutheran Campus Ministry leader including visited Nicaragua and educated Americans on importance of fair trade with Nicaraguan coffee farmers and others, served as NMU EarthKeeper (NMU EK) Student Team project director.

1-906-399-7113
email NMU Lutheran Campus Ministry

Beekeeper. Beekeeper Jim Hayward,Negaunee Twonship,Apiary,honeybees,Amanda Emerson,Tanya Nelson,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Michigan,Upper Peninsula,Colony Collapse Disorder,bees,pollinators Amanda Emerson,Eco-Christmas,Northern Michigan University,Peter White Public Library,Christmas,2009 Photobucket Photobucket Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Amanda Emerson

Amanda is a NMU student leader, and volunteers for numerous nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute projects including the Zaagkii Project and serves as project coordinator for the NMU EarthKeeper Student team

847-791-5693

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Keweenaw Bay Indian Community,KBIC

Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC)

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KBIC Tribal Council President Warren C. “Chris” Swartz Jr.

KBIC Vice Chair Susan LaFernier

906-353-6623

Todd Warner, Director of KBIC Natural Resource Department (NRD)

906-524-5757

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Evelyn Ravindran, KBIC NRD Natural Resources Specialist

KBIC NRD employees help build butterfly houses in 2008:

Keweenaw Bay Indian Community,KBIC,tribal youth,youth,bees,butterflies,butterfly houses,bee,2008 Keweenaw Bay Indian Community,KBIC,tribal youth,youth,bees,butterflies,butterfly houses,bee,2008 Photobucket Photobucket

Katie Kruse, NRD Environment specialist

Char Beesley, Environment Specialist

Kit Laux, NRD Water Quality Specialist

Kim Klopstein, one of the summer youth supervisors for the KBIC Summer Youth Program

906-201-0020

NMU Center for Native American Studies banner/llogo

Northern Michigan University Center for Native American Studies (CNAS)

Photobucket Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Marquette,Michigan,Presque Isle,April Lindala,Jan Schukltz,kids,USFS,United States Forest Service,NMU,Northern Michigan University Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket

April Lindala, Director

112F Whitman Hall

906-227-1397 (office)
906-227-1396 (fax)

Zaagkii Headshots

NMU CNAS Professor Kenneth Pitawanakwat, Anishinaabemowin Instructor
112D Whitman Hall
Phone: 906-227-1504
Fax: 906-227-1396
E-mail: kpitawan@nmu.edu
Biographical profile

Northern Michigan University,NMU CNAS Professor Adriana Greci Green,NMU,NMU Center for Native American Studies,Professor Adriana Greci Green,Zaagkii Project,Native American

NMU CNAS Asst. Professor Adriana Greci Green
112C Whitman Hall
Phone: 906-227-2374
Fax: 906-227-1396
E-mail: agreen@nmu.edu
Biographical profile

NMU students Zaagkii Project presentation to USFS in Milwaukee

NMU Brochure/report on Zaagkii Project: Seven edible and medicinal native plants used by Ojibway traditional culture in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula


2009 Zaagkii Project Levi and Leona Tadgerson Native American Teens 7-7-09 2009 Zaagkii Project Levi and Leona Tadgerson Native American Teens 7-7-09 2009 Zaagkii Project Levi and Leona Tadgerson Native American Teens 7-7-09 Photobucket
NMU CNAS Zaagkii Project interns: Levi Tadgerson of Negaunee and sister, Leora Tadgerson of Marquette, members of Bay Mills Indian Community

906-360-0451 (Levi)

USFS Zaagkii Project contacts:

Jane Cliff, USFS Public Relations in Milwaukee

414-297-3664

Angie Lucas, contractor, Hiawatha National Forest Greenhouse Manager

Photobucket Photobucket

906-228-8491

Terry Miller, forest botanist at the Hiawatha National Forest Office in Escanaba, MI

U.S. Forest Service success story,USFS,United States Forest Service,U.S. Department of Agriculture,Monarch,butterfly,butterflies,Marquette,Michigan,National Monarch Butterfly Workshop,Hiawatha National Forest,forest,botanist,botany,Deb LeBlanc,Deb Le Blanc,Terry Miller,plug,Escanaba

Botanist Terry Miller is pictured planting plugs in this USFS photo

USDA USFS Hiawatha Forest District

2727 North Lincoln Road

Escanaba, MI

49825

906-786-4062
906-789-3319

Hiawatha National Forest website

Hiawatha National Forest Service offices

Deb Le Blanc, WestSide Plant Ecologist at the Hiawatha National Forest office in Munising, MI

(Does Monarch Workshops)

Hiawatha National Forest hosted a National Monarch Butterfly Workshop during June 2008 in Marquette, MI

U.S. Forest Service success story,USFS,United States Forest Service,U.S. Department of Agriculture,Monarch,butterfly,butterflies,Marquette,Michigan,National Monarch Butterfly Workshop,Hiawatha National Forest,forest,botanist,botany,Deb LeBlanc,Deb Le Blanc,Terry Miller,plug,Escanaba

Deb Le Blanc, USDA
400 Munising Ave.
Munising, MI
49862

email Deb Le Blanc
906-387-2512 ext. 19

U.S. Forest Service success story,USFS,United States Forest Service,U.S. Department of Agriculture,Monarch,butterfly,butterflies,Marquette,Michigan,National Monarch Butterfly Workshop,Hiawatha National Forest,forest,botanist,botany,Deb LeBlanc,Deb Le Blanc,Terry Miller,plug,Escanaba

The Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation:

The Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis Fitzhugh (Miller) Reynolds,Mrs. Maxwell K. Reynolds,Jr.,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette founding father Peter White,Peter White,Joan (Reynolds) Miller,Don Miller,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Manoomin Project,bees,butterflies,wild rice,philanthropy,philanthropist,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation Inc.,Wells Fargo Bank

Phyllis Fitzhugh (Miller) Reynolds (Mrs. Maxwell K. Reynolds, Jr.) of Marquette, Mich., passed away Nov. 10, 2009 at the age of 89.
She was preceded in death by her husband, Maxwell, the great-grandson of Marquette founding father Peter White, in 1988

CTI honors Joan (Reynolds) and Don Miller
Joan is one of four daughters of Phyllis and Max Reynolds.

The Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis Fitzhugh (Miller) Reynolds,Mrs. Maxwell K. Reynolds,Jr.,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette founding father Peter White,Peter White,Joan (Reynolds) Miller,Don Miller,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Manoomin Project,bees,butterflies,wild rice,philanthropy,philanthropist,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation Inc.,Wells Fargo Bank The Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis Fitzhugh (Miller) Reynolds,Mrs. Maxwell K. Reynolds,Jr.,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette founding father Peter White,Peter White,Joan (Reynolds) Miller,Don Miller,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Manoomin Project,bees,butterflies,wild rice,philanthropy,philanthropist,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation Inc.,Wells Fargo Bank

Alyson “Aly” Luff (left) of Marquette and her mother Joan Miller at the 2009 Cedar Tree Institute MidSummer Festival in Marquette.

Alyson has taken photos of numerous Cedar Tree Institute projects and events.

The Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis Fitzhugh (Miller) Reynolds,Mrs. Maxwell K. Reynolds,Jr.,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette founding father Peter White,Peter White,Joan (Reynolds) Miller,Don Miller,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Manoomin Project,bees,butterflies,wild rice,philanthropy,philanthropist,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation Inc.,Wells Fargo Bank The Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis Fitzhugh (Miller) Reynolds,Mrs. Maxwell K. Reynolds,Jr.,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette founding father Peter White,Peter White,Joan (Reynolds) Miller,Don Miller,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Manoomin Project,bees,butterflies,wild rice,philanthropy,philanthropist,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation Inc.,Wells Fargo Bank

Joan and Don Miller attend the 2009 CTI MidSummer Festival.

The Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation,Phyllis Fitzhugh (Miller) Reynolds,Mrs. Maxwell K. Reynolds,Jr.,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette founding father Peter White,Peter White,Joan (Reynolds) Miller,Don Miller,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,Manoomin Project,bees,butterflies,wild rice,philanthropy,philanthropist,Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation Inc.,Wells Fargo Bank

Joan Miller (center) with other Zaagkii Project supporters at the 2008 and 2009 CTI MidSummer festival.

Cool Cities website and the Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation

Websites that list philanthropy organizations including the Phyllis and Max Reynolds Foundation

Phyllis And Max Reynolds Foundation Inc
Box 580 Trust Dept. Wells Fargo Bank
101 W Washington St
Marquette, MI
49855-0580

Alyson Luff,Aly Luff,Phyllis And Max Reynolds Foundation,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,nonprofit,Cedar Tree Institute,photographer,suicide prevention,American Foundation for Suicide Prevention,AFSP,Out of the Darkness Community Walks,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette 2010 Out of the Darkness Community Walk,2010 Out of the Darkness Community Walk,Marquette Commons,teen suicide,teens,youth suicide,suicide
Alyson “Aly” Luff is the granddaughter of the late Phyllis And Max Reynolds, whose foundation supports the Zaagkii Project and other nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute initiatives.

A Zaagkii Project photographer, Aly is active in suicide prevention organizations including the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) and its annual Out of the Darkness Community Walks.
Alyson Luff,Aly Luff,Phyllis And Max Reynolds Foundation,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,nonprofit,Cedar Tree Institute,photographer,suicide prevention,American Foundation for Suicide Prevention,AFSP,Out of the Darkness Community Walks,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette 2010 Out of the Darkness Community Walk,2010 Out of the Darkness Community Walk,Marquette Commons,teen suicide,teens,youth suicide,suicide
Alyson Luff,Aly Luff,Phyllis And Max Reynolds Foundation,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,nonprofit,Cedar Tree Institute,photographer,suicide prevention,American Foundation for Suicide Prevention,AFSP,Out of the Darkness Community Walks,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette 2010 Out of the Darkness Community Walk,2010 Out of the Darkness Community Walk,Marquette Commons,teen suicide,teens,youth suicide,suicide

Out of the Darkness Community Walks on myspace
Alyson Luff,Aly Luff,Phyllis And Max Reynolds Foundation,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,nonprofit,Cedar Tree Institute,photographer,suicide prevention,American Foundation for Suicide Prevention,AFSP,Out of the Darkness Community Walks,Marquette,Michigan,Marquette 2010 Out of the Darkness Community Walk,2010 Out of the Darkness Community Walk,Marquette Commons,teen suicide,teens,youth suicide,suicide

The 2010 Marquette, MI Out of the Darkness Community Walk will be held on Sept 18, 2010 starting at the Marquette Commons
9 a.m. Registration
10 a.m. Walk begins

For more information on the Marquette Out of the Darkness Community Walk email Alyson Luff or call 1-906-235-1969

——-

The Kaufman Foundation in Marquette, MI

City of Marquette names Kaufman Sports Complex

Kaufman Auditorium in Marquette, MI and related Foundation projects

Kaufman Foundation helps youth hockey

Kaufman Foundation and Graveraet School G.R.E.A.T. Project

Kaufman Foundation helps city of Marquette

——-

Marquette Community Foundation

Marquette Community Foundation
P.O. Box 37
401 East Fair Avenue
Marquette, MI 49855-2951

1-906-226-7666 (office)
1-906-226-2104 (fax)

Become a fan of the Marquette Community Foundation on Facebook

Marquette Community Foundation staff

Dr. Carole L. Touchinski, CFRM
Executive Director

Linda Vallier
FIMS Operator

Dani Thoune
Programs Director

Photobucket

Marquette Community Foundation Boards of Directors:

President Robert Cowell
Vice President Mark Canale
Treasurer John Marshall
Secretary Maura Davenport

Board members:
Craig Stien
Stu Bradley
Marilyn Andrew
Michael Roy
John Maki
Don Mourand
Katy Martin
John Lenten
Roger Zappa

——-
M.E. Davenport Foundation logo,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,philanthropy,philanthropist,bee,bees,pollinators,pollinate,butterfly,butterflies,mason bee,honeybee

The M.E. Davenport Foundation
415 E. Fulton St. SE
Warren Hall
Grand Rapids, MI.
49503

1-616-732-1098

M.E. Davenport Foundation supports Cedar Tree Institute initiatives like the Zaagkii Project and native species plants

Davenport University

The M.E. Davenport Foundation Board of Directors:

Margaret Moceri, President
Gregory Moceri, Vice-President/Treasurer
Mary Sneden Sullivan, Secretary
Marcia Sneden, Trustee
Donald Maine, Trustee
James Setchfield, M.D., Trustee

——-

Rick Pietila does Tai Chi July 2009
Martial artist Rick Pietila of Marquette, MI
Rick Pietila does Tai Chi July 2009 Rick Pietila does Tai Chi July 2009
Pietilla is an instructor of San Shou, Tai Chi and other martial arts.
Rick Pietila does Tai Chi July 2009 Rick Pietila does Tai Chi July 2009
Rick Pietila’s other ongoing amazing adventures include traveling with several legendary Rock and Roll groups including being a guitar tech for the band Boston and traveled into South America with the band Stryper.

Photobucket Rick Pietila does Tai Chi July 2009

Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute Winter 2008 newsletter that mentions Rick Pietila

Rick Pietila does Tai Chi July 2009

Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute Winter 2009 newsletter that mentions Rick Pietila

Zaagkii Project story in Sept. 2009 Marquette Monthly

Zaagkii Project videos on youtube

Zaagkii Project videos on bliptv

Zaagkii Project wordpress blog

United State Forest Service (USFS) Celebrating Wildflowers and Pollinators websites

Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute in Marquette, MI

Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC)

Marquette County Juvenile Court

Marquette County Juvenile Court and Project WEAVE

Jim Rule at Hayward bee farm Photobucket Jim Rule at Hayward bee farm

Jim Rule, a child care counselor at Marquette County Youth Home, is pictured on June 25, 2009 on a Zaagkii Project outing to the apiary owned by beekeeper Jim Hayward


Borealis Seed Company
Big Bay, Michigan

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Run by mother-daughter team of Judy Keast and Suzanne Rabitaille cultivating about 5 acres of a 20-acre spread three miles south of Big Bay, Michigan.

http://www.ltbbodawa-nsn.gov/index.html


Dancing Crane Farm

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Owned by Natasha and David Gill

Dancing Crane Farm has naturally grown and raised vegetables, flowers and more on 20 acres with almost five acres cultvated

Natasha and David Gill
Dancing Crane Farm
348 Lawson Road
Skandia, MI 49885

906-942-7975

email the organic Dancing Crane Farm

info@dancingcranefarm.com

http://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/internships/farmdetails.php?FarmName=&City=&State=MI&Keyword=&allDate=0&page=1&FarmID=1957

Assorted vegetables, herbs,flowers,and seedlings
Custom workshops, ongoing classes, farm tours, apprenticeships, volunteer opportunities, and an annual Harvest Party open to the public.
Produce can be purchased at the Marquette, Gwinn, and Munising Farmers Markets and at the Dancing Crane Farm.
Open June-October.

Beekeepers:

Dr. Jim Hayward

Zaagkii Headshots Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Jim Hayward Bee Farm Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Photobucket Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Dr. Jim and Martha Hayward
103A Buffalo Rd.
Negaunee, MI
49866

906-475-7582

email Negaunee, MI beekeeper Dr. Jim Hayward


Beekeepers:

Gather’n Greens
Negaunee Township, Michigan

Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer,Lauren OssenheimerGather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer,Lauren OssenheimerPhotobucketGather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer,Lauren Ossenheimer

906-475-9338
(no website yet)

Owned by Lee Ossenheimer and his wife, Dr. Lisa Long in Negaunee Township, MI along the Dead River.

Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer,Lauren Ossenheimer Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer,Lauren Ossenheimer Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer,Lauren Ossenheimer Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer,Lauren Ossenheimer Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer,Lauren Ossenheimer Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer,Lauren Ossenheimer

The couple raise bees, make honey, grow mushrooms and grow seedlings for transplanting like peppers, tomatoes and about numerous herbs such as basil.

The couple has three children active in their nature-oriented, organic business:
Jesse Ossenheimer, 8; Lauren Ossenheimer, 5; and Alex Ossenheimer, 4.


Beekeeper:
Photobucket
Jon Kniskern
Marquette, MI

Beekeeper Jon Kniskern is quoted in a March 3, 2009 article on a University of Minnesota annual “Short Course” entitled “Beekeeping in Northern Climates” at Borlaug Hall on the St. Paul campus
The story was published in the Minnesota Daily newspaper in Minneapolis/St. Paul


Zaagkii Headshots Photobucket Photobucket Upper Peninsula Children's Museum,Jim Edwards,Nheena Weyer Ittner,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,bee hive,bee,butterfly,monarch,honeybee,Marquette,Michigan Photobucket Upper Peninsula Children's Museum,Jim Edwards,Nheena Weyer Ittner,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project,bee hive,bee,butterfly,monarch,honeybee,Marquette,Michigan Photobucket

Jim Edwards at the Upper Peninsula Children’s Museum who is in charge of “General Programming and Explainers Director”

Jim Edwards,Upper Peninsula Children's Museum,Monarch,butterfly,U.P. Children's Museum,Zaagkii Project,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project Photobucket

Edwards teamed with the Zaagkii Project students to build a giant monarch butterfly in 2008 and a big bee hive in 2009 using art-related items at the museum in Marquette, MI

Upper Peninsula Children’s Museum

123 W. Baraga Avenue

Marquette, MI

49855

1-906-226-3911 (office)
1-906- 226-7065 (fax)

email Nheena Weyer Ittner, director of the U.P. Children’s Museum

email Jim Edwards, museum General Programming and Explainers Director

NativeVillage.org,Gina Blotz,Native Village Publications

American Indian,Native American,youth,bee,bees,Marquette,Michigan,Upper Peninsula,Baraga,teens,teenagers,pollinators,pollen,pollinating,butterflies,butterfly,honeybees,bumblebees,environment,native plants,species extinction

Zaagkii Project banner graphics by Gina Boltz, the director and editor of Native Village Publications including NativeVillage.org and a champion and fighter for Native American and Indigenous youth causes

Nativevillage.org main Zaagkii Page

NativeVillage.org,Gina Blotz,Native Village Publications

The International Council of Thirteen Indigenous Grandmothers: Internet Youth Forum on NativeVillage.org

NativeVillage.org 2009 Zaagkii Story and photos

NativeVillage.org 2008 Zaagkii Story and photos

Zaagkii Project Credit for music used in videos:

Music on Zaagkii Project videos courtesy of Chicago area band Dragon Fire Parade, which has Upper Peninsula roots

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

Photo caption:
Members of the Chicago area band Dragon Fire Parade pictured are Andy Wicklund (upper left), Chris Hammond (upper right), Peter Nemanich (lower left) and Tim Obert (lower right).

Dragon Fire Parade:

Andy Wicklund, Guitar
Tim Obert, Guitar
Peter Nemanich, Bass
Chris Hammond, Drums

email Dragon Fire Parade


Cedar Tree Institute,Zaagkii Project,band,Terracotta half-life,Jerry Kippola,Guitar,Aaron Kippola,Alto Saxophone,Percussion,Obadiah  Metivier,Bass Guitar,Vocals,Jennie Peano,Steve Leuthold,Baritone Saxaphone,Tenor Saxophone,Flute,Dan Schaefer,Drums,Emmanuel Kawedi,Congas

Official band of the Cedar Tree Institute/Zaagkii Project annual Midsummer Festival:

Terracotta half-life

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

Terracotta half-life biography

Bio about the one and only Obadiah Metivier, a band member, overall techie genious and Zaagkii Project volunteer webmaster and technical guru

Jerry Kippola, Guitar

Aaron Kippola, Alto Saxophone, Percussion

Obadiah Metivier, Bass Guitar, Vocals, Percussion

Jennie Peano, Vocals, Percussion

Steve Leuthold, Baritone and Tenor Saxophone, Flute

Dan Schaefer, Drums

Emmanuel Kawedi, Congas, Percussion, Vocals

Alumni – Keyboards, Guitars, Drums, Sax, Trumpet, Congas, Timbales, etc.


Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

Upcoming Shows:

Wed 2/10/2010: Upfront
Fri 2/26/2010: Harley’s Lounge
Fri 3/12/2010: Marquette Food Co-op Meeting of Owners
Wed 3/24/2010: Upfront
Tue 7/13/2010: Menominee Summer Concert Series

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

Marquette Mining Journal feature story #2 on Zaagkii Project on 12-13-08 about the first year of protecting pollinators

Marquette Mining Journal feature story #1 on Zaagkii Project on 7-14-08 about 208 annual Cedar Tree Institute annual Mid-Summer Festival in Marquette, MI

News From Indian Country (NFIC) feature story on Zaagkii Project

Indian Country Today feature stories on Zaagkii Project:

Part 1: Pollinator Preservation

Part 2: Sand Point Restoration
——-

NAISA,Native American and Indigenous Studies Association,Tuscon,Arizona,Zaagkii Project,Leora Tadgerson,Professor Adriana Greci Green,NMU,CNAS,Students,Northern Michigan University,The University of Arizona,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project

Zaakii Project intern Leora Tadgerson to participate in a roundtable at the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association (NAISA) 2010 National Conference on May 20-22, 2010 in Tuscon, AZ

Zaagkii Project and Northern Michigan Center for Native American Studies (NMU CNAS) participants:

NAISA,Native American and Indigenous Studies Association,Tuscon,Arizona,Zaagkii Project,Leora Tadgerson,Professor Adriana Greci Green,NMU,CNAS,Students,Northern Michigan University,The University of Arizona,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project

NAISA,Native American and Indigenous Studies Association,Tuscon,Arizona,Zaagkii Project,Leora Tadgerson,Professor Adriana Greci Green,NMU,CNAS,Students,Northern Michigan University,The University of Arizona,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project

NMU CNAS Conference info:
SATURDAY, MAY 22, 2010
12:00-1:45 p.m.
118 ROUNDTABLE:
“Engaging Students through Community Action and Service”
Organizer & Chair:
Adriana Greci Green, Northern Michigan University

Participants include:
Leora Tadgerson, Zaagkii Project intern from Northern Michigan University Center for Native American Studies
Damien Lee, Trent University, Canada
Nicholas Estes, University of South Dakota
Karla Tait, University of South Dakota
Leya Hale, University of South Dakota
Linc Kesler, University of British Columbia, Canada

NAISA 2010 Conference Program details
Preliminary Daily Schedule
The NAISA 2010 Conference is sponsored by the American Indian Studies at The University of Arizona

NAISA,Native American and Indigenous Studies Association,Tuscon,Arizona,Zaagkii Project,Leora Tadgerson,Professor Adriana Greci Green,NMU,CNAS,Students,Northern Michigan University,The University of Arizona,Zaagkii Wings and Seeds Project

NAISA staff photo

Robert Warrior, NAISA President 2009-2010

email organizers of the NAISA 2010 Conference

Contact information:
Sunny Lybarger
1-520-626-7695
Tsianina Lomawaima
1-520-621-5083

Hotel registration info and the deadline for NAISA Group Room Rate April 18, 2010

1-520-742-6000

Westin La Paloma
3800 East Sunrise Drive
Tucson, AZ
85718

Native Times newspaper aka Native American Times Zaagkii Project pollinators story

Turtle Island News:

http://www.turtleisland.org/discussion/viewtopic.php?p=9683#9683

Marquette Monthly Nov. 2008 (scroll down):

http://www.mmnow.com/z_current_a/b/c/city_notes.html

Tree Hugger: (This article appeared on over 1,000 websites)

http://www.treehugger.com/files/2008/10/zaagkii–wings-seeds-project.php

Zaagkii KBIC newsletter (scroll down to page 4):

http://www.kbic-nsn.gov/files/newsletter/Sept_2008.pdf

Sault Ste. Marie Band of Chippewa Story on Zaagkii Project (Scroll down to page 7)

http://www.saulttribe.com/index2.php?option=com_docman&task=doc_view&gid=959&Itemid=266

Great Story in Native Villge Web:

http://www.nativevillage.org/Messages%20from%20the%20People/MesPeo%20KBIC%20Tribal%20Youth%20Zaagkii%20Project/kbic_tribal_youth_protect_pollin1.htm

Earth Times – London:

http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/show/michigan-teens-native-american-youth,593342.shtml

Good News Network National Newspaper:

http://www.goodnewsnetwork.org

To see story – sign up for free 30 day trial by click on headline of story

Monarch Watch:

Author Lynn M. Rosenblatt,Monarch Magic,Monarch Magic!,book,author,monarch,butterfly,buterflies,monarch butterfly,Lynn M. Rosenblatt

Monarch Author Lynn M. Rosenblatt (above with children) who wrote the book MONARCH MAGIC!

Photobucket

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The Pollinator Partnership
c/o The Coevolution Institute
Laurie Davies Adams, Executive Director
423 Washington St, 5th Fl
San Francisco, CA
94111-2339

1-415-362-1137 (office)
1-415-362-3070 (fax)

Pollinator Partnership,pollinatorpartnership.org,pollinators,bees,butterflies,pollinate

Pollinator Partnership

Pollinator Week is June 21-27, 2010

The fourth annual National Pollinator Week will be held from June 21-27, 2010.

Think about an event at your school, garden, church, store, etc.

Pollinators positively effect all our lives – let’s save them and celebrate them!

Pollinator Partnership,pollinatorpartnership.org,pollinators,bees,butterflies,pollinate

Pollinator Partnership Movie

Pollinator News from Pollinator Partnership
email the Pollinator Partnership

North American Pollinator Protection Campaign
Working to protect the pollinators of the North American continent

North American Pollinator Protection Campaign #2 (NAPPC)

emails:
info@NAPPC.org; LDA@pollinator.org

415-362-3070 (fax)

Lots of different handouts & ideas for National Pollinator Week

——-

Numerous Monarch related links:

http://www.kidsgardening.com/pollinator/curriculum/resources.php

http://www.insecta-inspecta.com/butterflies/monarch/index.html

http://www.nhptv.org/natureworks/monarch.htm

http://www.learner.org/jnorth/monarch

U.S. Department of Agriculture Headquarters and “The People’s Garden” in Washington, D.C. – Bringing Nature into the Public Realm: Green The Grounds

Feature stories on the People’s Garden in Washington, D.C. featured on discovery.com that is “Bringing Nature into the Public Realm: Green The Grounds” at the U.S. Department of Agriculture Headquarters:

Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) story on ground broken on USDA USFS “The People’s Garden” in Washington, D.C.

USFS The Peoples Garden in Washington, D.C.

USFS News Release on The Peoples Garden

USFS sustainable operations information and links to articles including The Peoples Garden

Wikipedia on Monarch butterflies and Lepidotera migration, a phenomenon where butterflies or moths migrate over long distances to areas where they cannot settle for long periods of time.

Photo by Mila Zinkova of Monarch butterflies migration and cluster on Nov. 25, 2007 in Santa Cruz to spend a winter via Wikipedia Creative Commons. During migration Monarch butterflies travel up to three thousand miles.

email Mila Zinkova

Photograph by Wikipedia user Bfpage of some of the overwintering monarch butterflies in Feb. 2000 at a preserve outside of Angangueo, Mexico. One tree is completely covered in butterflies.

Artwork of Migrating butterflies aka Lepidoptera migration art

Artistic picture by Pilar Murillo of Spain
Wikipedia username: Pilar

flickr username: izarbeltza


Wikipedia on Goldenrod

Goldenrod photo by Kurt Stueber aka Kurt Stüber via Wikipedia creative commons

email Kurt Stueber

Goldenrod Photo by Huw Williams – Wikipedia username Huwmanbeing

Goldenrod flowers photographed in western Fountain County, Indiana on September 15, 207 via Wikipedia creative commons

Goldenrod and visiting Cerceris wasp by Wiki user Hardyplants via Wikipedia creative commons

Goldenrod Photo by Georg Slickers taken on August 15, 2005 in Berlin, Germany via Wikipedia creative commons
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Wikipedia on Monarchs

Wikipedia page with a Female Monarch photo in May 2007 by Kenneth Dwain Harrelson

Wikipedia page with Male Monarch photo by Derek Ramsey (Wikipedia user name Ram-Man) at the Tyler Arboretum

Bees disappearing around the world:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pollinator_decline

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bees_and_toxic_chemicals

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colony_Collapse_Disorder

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pesticide_toxicity_to_bees

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imidacloprid_effects_on_bee_population

http://www.burtsbees.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ContentView?contentPageId=531&catalogId=10051&storeId=10001&langId=-1

http://www.polinator.org

http://www.vanishingbees.com

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diseases_of_the_honey_bee

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endangered_arthropod

Wikipedia Honeybee Photos by Björn Appel, Wikipedia Username Warden.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Warden

Edit by Waugsberg (cropped)

A honeybee on an apiary, cooling by flapping its wings in Tübingen-Hagelloch.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c5/Honeybee-cooling_cropped.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/df/Honeybee-cooling.jpg

Wiki Bee photos by Waugsberg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Waugsberg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/dc/Biene_88a.jpg

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:Biene_88a.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b8/Bienen_im_Flug_52e.jpg

Bumblebees: Space For Nature Garden biodiversity forum

http://www.wildlife-gardening.org.uk/default.asp?gallery=Galleries\Animals\Insects\Bumblebees\bombus-pascuorum-040616.xml

Bumblebee Photo Copyright Richard Burkmar 2004. Permission is hereby granted for anyone to use this image for non-commercial purposes which are of benefit to the natural environment.

Richard Burkmar (editor of Space for Nature) graduated from the University College of Cardiff in 1984 with a degree in zoology and a PhD in avian ecology in 1989. He currently works for Merseyside Environmental Advisory Service where he manages the North Merseyside Biodiversity Action Plan (Liverpool, St. Helens, Knowsley and Sefton Boroughs).

Bumblebees: Buckingham Nurseries and Garden Centre

http://www.buckingham-nurseries.co.uk/acatalog/bumblebees.html

Bumblebee photo by Oxford Bee Company/Buckingham Nurseries and Garden Centre

Bumblebees by Christopher O’Toole

http://www.buckingham-nurseries.co.uk/acatalog/Index_Pollination_Bees_27.html#33171

Chris O’Toole is the director of Bee Systematics and Biology Unit at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History.

He has written many books on insect natural history including Bees of the World and Alien Empire.

Pictures and information provided by the Oxford Bee Company & Buckingham Nurseries and Garden Centre website

Wind Pollinated plants like Rye are important but are not food sources for pollinators:

Wind Pollinated Rye photo by Paul Billiet and Shirley Burchill

http://www.saburchill.com/chapters/chap0044.html

Wikipedia on Pollination:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pollination

Photo by By Debi Vort (Wikipedia Username Debivort) of an Andrena bee collects pollen among the stamens of a rose. The female carpel structure appears rough and globular to the left. The bee’s stash of pollen is on its hind leg.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Bee_pollenating_a_rose.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Debivort

A European honey bee collects nectar, while pollen collects on its body.

A European honey bee (Apis mellifera) extracts nectar from an Aster flower using its proboscis. Tiny hairs covering the bee’s body maintain a slight electrostatic charge, causing pollen from the flower’s anthers to stick to the bee, allowing for pollination when the bee moves on to another flower.

Photo by John Severns (Wikipedia username Severnjc)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:European_honey_bee_extracts_nectar.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Severnjc

Blueberries being pollinated by bumblebees. Bumblebee hives need to be bought each year as the queens must hibernate (unlike honey bees). They are used nonetheless as they offer advantages with certain fruits as blueberries (such as the fact that they are active even at colder outdoor ambient temperature) A picture showing blueberry pollination by bumblebees, aswell as the system of furrow irrigation using siphon tubes. Pictures were taken at “blueberry fields”, Koersel, Belgium.

A picture showing blueberry pollination by bumblebees, as well as the system of furrow irrigation using siphon tubes. Pictures were taken in July 2008 at “blueberry fields”, Koersel, Belgium.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:BlueberryPollinationByBumblebees.jpg

Photo by Kristof Van der Poorten Wikipedia username KVDP

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:KVDP

http://kvdp.blogspot.com

http://healingweb.blogspot.com

Environmental Health Science of Columbia University

60 Haven Ave.

Room 100

New York, NY

10032

http://www.mailman.hs.columbia.edu/ehs/index.html

Wikipedia on Cultivars & Hybrids:

A cultivar is a particular variety of a plant species or hybrid that is being cultivated and/or is recognised as a cultivar under the ICNCP. The concept of cultivar is driven by pragmatism, and serves the practical needs of horticulture, agriculture, forestry, etc.

The plant chosen as a cultivar may have been bred deliberately, selected from plants in cultivation, or discovered in the wild. Cultivars can be asexual clones or seed-raised. Clones are genetically identical and will appear so when grown under the same conditions.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cultivar

Viola ‘Clear Crystals Apricot’, a hybrid cross viola (Viola x hybrida), Victoria, Australia. Wikipedia photo by John O’Neill (Wikipedia username Jjron)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User_talk:Jjron

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special:EmailUser/Jjron

Bee Movie:

http://www.beemovie.com

Created in 2007 by Jerry Seinfeld and DreamWorks Animation

Keweenaw Peninsula: Michigan’s Copper Country:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copper_mining_in_Michigan

http://www.unr.edu/sb204/geology/westernh.html

West Virginia White Butterfly & killer Garlic Mustard Seed plants:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Virginia_White

http://www.cbgarden.org/blog/index.php/tag/west-virginia-white-butterfly

http://leapbio.org/west_virginia_white.php

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/5a/3402_white_WV_ws.jpg

West Virginia White, Pieris virginiensis on wild mustard Photo by Randy L Emmitt

http://www.rlephoto.com/butterflies/white_wv01.htm

Butterflies/Moths:

The Butterfly Site:

http://www.thebutterflysite.com

Children’s butterfly links:

http://www.monarchbutterflyusa.com/Links.htm

Butterfly Encounters:

http://www.butterflyencounters.com

Butterflys and Moths of North America:

http://www.butterfliesandmoths.org

Opler, Paul A., Harry Pavulaan, Ray E. Stanford, Michael Pogue, coordinators. 2006. Butterflies and Moths of North America. Bozeman, MT: NBII Mountain Prairie Information Node. http://www.butterfliesandmoths.org

Deciduous forests:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deciduous

Viceroys:

Viceroy Butterfly mimics Monarchs

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viceroy_butterfly

Wikipedia Viceroy photo by Piccolo “Pic” Namek

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:PiccoloNamek

Viceroy:

http://www.nhptv.org/natureworks/viceroy.htm

Photo by William T. Hark

Butterfly & endangered species hibernacula:

http://www.fws.gov/midwest/Endangered/lists/michigan-cty.html

http://www.naturenorth.com/summer/bgarden/bttgrdF.html

http://entweb.clemson.edu/museum/buttrfly/local/bfly12.htm

http://actazool.nhmus.hu/48/konvicka.pdf

http://earthcaretaker.com/naturalization/llamb.html

Mourning Cloaks aka Morning Cloaks:

http://www.sierrapotomac.org/W_Needham/MourningCloak_060319.htm

http://www.bentler.us/eastern-washington/insects/mourning-cloak.aspx

http://www.ivyhall.district96.k12.il.us/4th/kkhp/1insects/mourningcloak.html

http://www.naturenorth.com/spring/bug/mcloak/Fmcloak.html

Mason bees – bee houses in wood:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mason_bee

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6c/Osmia_rufa_couple_(aka).jpg

Photo of an Red Mason Bee couple (osmia rufa) by André Karwath of German Wikipedia also known as AKA (André Karwath):

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Aka

Mason Bees:

http://www.farminfo.org/bees/mason-bees.htm

http://www.everythingabout.net/articles/biology/animals/arthropods/insects/bees/mason_bee

Photo by Kim Taylor of Bruce Coleman Inc.

http://www.masonbeehomes.com/bee_houses.php

http://www.pollinator.com/mason_homes.htm

http://www.insectpix.net/Homes_for_bees.htm

Brownfield sites:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brownfields

http://ncrs.fs.fed.us/4902/focus/restoration/brownfield

Mass Mill – copper processing waste (stamp sands) cleanup:

(search for KBIC in following document)

http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/programs/tribalgov/ImprovingPartnerships.pdf

http://www.uprcd.org/projects.asp

http://www.upea.com/filesfordownloading/Baragadraft.pdf

Manoomin Project:

Manoomin Project: Restoring wild rice to seven remote Upper Peninusla lakes, stream as students planted over 1 ton of wild rice seeds with help from elders with the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community
Another collaboration between the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute and the Keweenaw bay Indian Community

Zaagkii Project Collage 2008-2009

http://www.indiancountry.com/content.cfm?id=1096416108

http://www.cedartreeinstitute.org/wildrice2007.html

http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/show/news_press_release,215966.%20shtml

http://blog.americanfeast.com/indigenous_food

http://www.goodnewsdaily.com/show_story.php?ID=3500

Manoomin Project Videos:

http://blip.tv/file/549632
http://blip.tv/file/341528

Manoomin Project counselor Dave Anthony, who belongs to the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa (Ottawa) Indian, and Northern Michigan University Center for Native American studies:

http://webb.nmu.edu/Centers/NativeAmericanStudies/SiteSections/Calendar/IEDSHighlights.shtml

http://webb.nmu.edu/Centers/NativeAmericanStudies/SiteSections/AboutUs/AboutUs.shtml

Dreamcatcher:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dreamcatcher_(Native_American)

http://www.dreamcatcher.com/home.php

Northern white cedar:

http://forestry.about.com/library/tree/blntwh.htm

More on honeybee decline:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pollinator_decline

http://www.masterbeekeeper.org/pdf/pollination.pdf

The Value of Honey Bees As Pollinators of U.S. Crops in 2000 by Drs. Roger Morse and Nicholas Calderone of Cornell University (2000) :

Colony Collapse Disorder (or CCD) is a poorly understood phenomenon in which worker bees from a beehive or Western honey bee colony abruptly disappear. While such disappearances have occurred throughout the history of apiculture, the term Colony Collapse Disorder was first applied to a drastic rise in the number of disappearances of Western honey bee colonies in North America in late 2006.

European beekeepers observed a similar phenomenon in Belgium, France, the Netherlands, Greece, Italy, Portugal, and Spain, and initial reports have also come in from Switzerland and Germany, albeit to a lesser degree. Possible cases of CCD have also been reported in Taiwan since April 2007.

NASA, Kids and the Environment:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2010-033&cid=release_2010-033&msource=a20100128&tr=y&auid=5868619

U.S. Forest Service Celebrating Wildflowers web page:

American Indian,Native American,youth,bee,bees,Marquette,Michigan,Upper Peninsula,Baraga,teens,teenagers,pollinators,pollen,pollinating,butterflies,butterfly,honeybees,bumblebees,environment,native plants,species extinction

Photobucket

Two Native American supporters of the Zaagkii Project, attending the July 2009 nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute Mid-Summer Festival at Presque Isle in Marquette, stand next to the beehive made by students with help from the director of the U.P. Childrens Museum. (Photo by Greg Peterson)

Smoking Allowed:

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer
Being calmed by a smoker in the hands of beekeeper Dr. Jim Hayward, thousands of honeybees cling to the hive frame in June 2009 that is used by the bees to make honeycombs. (Photo by Erika Niebler)

Learning from a Master:

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Zaagkii Project students watch beekeeper Dr. Jim Hayward use a gripper to remove frames from the hives behind his home in Negaunee, MI during June 2009. (Photo by Erika Niebler)

Teen Beekeepers:

Erika Niebler,Gather'n Greens,Lee Ossenheimer,Dr. Lisa Long,Negaunee Township,MI,Dead River,Michigan,bees,honey,mushrooms,seedlings,transplanting,peppers,tomatoes,herbs,basil,children,nature,organic,Jesse Ossenheimer

Zaagkii Project volunteers Elliott Burdick (left), 17, a Marquette Senior High School (MSHS) senior and Taylor Dianich, 16, MSHS junior (right) stand next to honeybee hives in June 2009. (Photo by Erika Niebler)

2008 Zaagkii Projects Teens:

In July 2008 at the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute annual Mid-Summer Festival, Zaagkii Project teens told supporters what they were learning about pollinators and indigenous plants and wildflowers.